Medieval Jewish Settlements in Oxford

Originally posted on Giaconda's Blog:
The Crypt at Oxford Castle – built on Anglo-Saxon foundations The first Jewish settlers arrived in Oxford not long after the Norman Conquest, around 1075AD residing in the commercial heart of the city at St Aldates which became known as Great Jewry Street, close to the original C8th oxen…

Athelstan–Our Greatest Monarch?

A recent poll searching for Britain’s ‘Greatest Monarch’, came up with the surprise winner of… drum roll, King Athelstan. Not that the Anglo-Saxon king wasn’t so great, but the winner is a little surprising since most people seem to have believed the ‘crown’ would go to Elizabeth I. (Yawn!) I hope the voters actually remembered… Continue reading Athelstan–Our Greatest Monarch?

Did a volcanic eruption somewhere in the world affect England in 1391….?

  Huge volcanic eruptions have always affected parts of the world that are often far, far away from the centre of the event. A famous (to me) example of this was in 1815 with Mount Tambora (in what is now Indonesia) which created such clouds and darkness that it made 1816 “the Year Without a… Continue reading Did a volcanic eruption somewhere in the world affect England in 1391….?

Rob Bell explains …

“Walking Britain’s Lost Railways” is back, for a fourth series, starting in Yorkshire. As well as walking the former York to Hull route, Bell explains why the East Coast Main Line, as it now is, passes through York and not Leeds, although the latter is now more than four times larger. This situation, in which… Continue reading Rob Bell explains …

The story of Queen Margaret’s Gate, York….

  “….[Queen Margaret’s Gate, Bootham Bar] was supposedly intended as a short-cut for King Henry VII (the man who had defeated Richard III) when he was visiting York and stayed at the Abbot’s Lodging, now King’s Manor. The short cut would have made it quicker for him to get from the abbey to the Minster….”… Continue reading The story of Queen Margaret’s Gate, York….

Richard III: Coming Home – to the Yorkshire Museum….

The following extract is from site this site, which concerns various attractions in York. I have picked out the paragraphs that apply paricularly to Richard III. “….The Yorkshire Museum, meanwhile, is scheduled to re-open in late July – by which time it will have been closed for 16 months, thanks to the Covid pandemic. “….It… Continue reading Richard III: Coming Home – to the Yorkshire Museum….

Richard only became king because of the Council of the North. Got it….?

Something caught my attention in this article about the role York has played in our history. Here is the relevant extract:- “….In 1405, the Percys seriously proposed to create a separate Northern kingdom forever. The Wars of the Roses was at heart all about that divide. Richard III became king only because he had his… Continue reading Richard only became king because of the Council of the North. Got it….?

The prospect of an exciting new dig at York….!

The York Archaeological Society is hoping that an important new dig in the city is going to attract thousands of tourists. It will be an excavation into the city’s Roman history, and being outdoors will be an advantage in these times of Covid 19 restrictions. This can only be a good thing when so many… Continue reading The prospect of an exciting new dig at York….!

Dan Jones hits the road …

… Walking Britain’s Roman Roads, in fact. It is quite a good series, in which Jones explores some of the most important of these, together with some aspects of Romano-British Society. The first episode takes him the length of Watling Street, the first part of which is now he M2, during which he visits the… Continue reading Dan Jones hits the road …

“From Augustinians to Eboracum at York Guildhall….”

“….During the medieval period, this site north of the 14th-century Guildhall was the location of York’s Augustinian friary, known to have hosted Richard III when he was the Duke of Gloucester. The YAT team uncovered several structures linked with the friary, including a series of large ovens, which may have been part of the kitchens….”… Continue reading “From Augustinians to Eboracum at York Guildhall….”