The Royal Progress of Richard III

Following his coronation, Richard III – like all medieval monarchs – went on his “royal progress” through the realm.  Along with an entourage in excess of 200 household men, ecclesiastics, supporters, and administrative officials, he visited towns and cities as far west as the River Severn, as far north as the River Ouse, and as… Continue reading The Royal Progress of Richard III

Sir Reginald Bray – not by L.P. Hartley

Reginald Bray was born in Worcester in around 1440. He was the second son of Sir Richard Bray, a surgeon, and Joan Troughton. He was educated at the Royal Grammar School at Worcester. Leland mentioned that his father, Sir Richard Bray was Henry VI’s doctor. Reginald was married to Catherine Hussey. Bray is described by… Continue reading Sir Reginald Bray – not by L.P. Hartley

TREASON 2 – The Parliament Of Devils, 1459

Introduction This is the second of two articles I have written about treason. In the first article, I wrote about the Merciless Parliament of 1388 at which eighteen of king Richard II’s closest advisors and friends were tried by parliament and condemned as traitors, against the king’s wishes. In this article I am writing about… Continue reading TREASON 2 – The Parliament Of Devils, 1459

These Boots Are Made For Walking: the Worcester Pilgrim Burial

Recently a fascinating burial was discovered in Worcester; that of a pilgrim who lived in the mid-15th century. What makes this find  extraordinary is the preservation of organics in the grave, including, rather spectacularly, the man’s tall leather boots. His pilgrim’s staff was also present. The Worcester pilgrim  certainly provides a window on the world… Continue reading These Boots Are Made For Walking: the Worcester Pilgrim Burial