Isabel Neville’s body arrives at Tewkesbury Abbey….

I have taken the following information and references from this article, so I do not claim the hard work for myself! The corpse of Isabel, Duchess of Clarence (†1476) was brought to Tewkesbury Abbey in Gloucestershire.[1] A monastic chronicle describes how it arrived there on 4 January 1477 and remained in the middle of the… Continue reading Isabel Neville’s body arrives at Tewkesbury Abbey….

TWO KINDS OF EXECUTION

Bishop John Fisher, born in Beverley, Yorkshire in October, 1469, was Margaret Beaufort’s confessor, a similarly dour man who liked to stick a skull on the altar at mass to remind you of mortality. He noted, marvelling, Margaret’s habit of weeping and wailing in emotional distress behind closed doors, as well as in public–such as… Continue reading TWO KINDS OF EXECUTION

MARY PLANTAGENET – DAUGHTER OF EDWARD IV & ELIZABETH WYDEVILLE – A LIFE CUT SHORT

Reblogged from Sparkypus.com: A Medieval Potpourri  Mary of York  Royal Window, Northwest Transept, Canterbury Cathedral Mary Plantagenet or Mary of York was the second daughter of King Edward IV and Elizabeth Wydville.  She was born at Windsor Castle in August 1467 and died at her mother’s favourite palace of Greenwich 23 May 1482 aged just… Continue reading MARY PLANTAGENET – DAUGHTER OF EDWARD IV & ELIZABETH WYDEVILLE – A LIFE CUT SHORT

Bah! Henry “Tudor” was not Earl of Richmond, and certainly not DUKE….!

I have just made the mistake of watching The Private Lives of the Tudors, which is based on the book of the same name by Tracy Borman. It’s bad enough that Henry Tudor is first referred to as the Earl of Richmond, but then Dr Susan Doran INSISTS upon referring to him as the DUKE of… Continue reading Bah! Henry “Tudor” was not Earl of Richmond, and certainly not DUKE….!

Cecily Neville

As we mentioned here, Ashdown-Hill’s biography of Richard’s mother was published in April. Whilst his latest, to which we shall return later, was released today, we shall concentrate on Cecily here. This is the book that summarises Cecily’s life by delineating her full and half-siblings, demonstrating that portraits (right) previously assumed to be of her and… Continue reading Cecily Neville

How and why the House of York laid claim to the throne….

Here is an article from English Historical Review, 1st June 1998, telling of how and why Richard, 3rd Duke of York, laid claim to the throne of England. The root cause was an entail to the will of Edward III, who was admittedly in his dotage at the time. The entail, which excluded a female… Continue reading How and why the House of York laid claim to the throne….

A well-connected Archdeacon?

As we said last year, late mediaeval prelates were often well-connected. Indeed, as this ODNB article shows, William Pykenham, Archdeacon of Suffolk, died some time in spring 1497, approximately sixty years after his father. His mother was Katherine Barrington, of the prominent Hatfield Broadoak family, which explains some of his appointments through her Bourchier and Stafford… Continue reading A well-connected Archdeacon?

Beads of gold with buckles….?

Thomas Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, KG, from the Bruges Garter Book, 1430/1440, BL Stowe 594. This started out as my first crie de coeur of 2017, and things did not bode well from the outset because I muddled my Thomas Beauchamps. Father and son, both Earls of Warwick, but it turns out to be the… Continue reading Beads of gold with buckles….?

Edward IV’s Will of 1475: “Bury Me Low in the Ground, with the Figure of Death”

In 1475, before embarking for his campaign to (re)conquer French lands for England, Edward IV wrote a will stating that, in the event of his death, he desired to be buried at the Royal Chapel of St. George’s at Windsor Castle. He wanted to be placed under the ground with an effigy of a corpse… Continue reading Edward IV’s Will of 1475: “Bury Me Low in the Ground, with the Figure of Death”