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Archive for the tag “William Tyndale”

Tyndale and the mumpsimuses….!

 

Mumpsimus is a word that may have originated with Erasmus, but of which I had never heard. It means “adherence to or persistence in an erroneous use of language, memorization, practice, belief, etc., out of habit or obstinacy”.

In William Tyndale‘s 1530 book Practice of Prelates, the word was used in the sense of a stubborn opponent to Tyndale’s views. He said that the men whom Cardinal Wolsey had asked to find reasons why Catherine of Aragon was not truly the wife of King Henry VIII of England were “all lawyers, and other doctors, mumpsimuses of divinity’.” (quoted from Wikipedia)

Well, my friends, we know a few of them, do we not? And not necessarily in connection with the law or the Church.

I’m sure Richard would think it of certain historians and biographers who’ve persisted in always saying the very worst of him! Traditionalist mumpsimuses. A bit of a mouthful, but sounds good!

Naming no names, of course.

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Starkey on home territory

This BBC documentary was actually very good and it worked because Starkey spoke about a subject he knows inside out – the Reformation and Henry VIII, relating it to current affairs. From Luther’s theses, indulgences and translating the Bible, first into German then English, he moved onto Tyndale‘s efforts to smuggle it into England and Henry’s efforts, through More, to stop him. Then came Wolsey, Campeggio and the King’s “great matter”, followed by More’s downfall and Anne Boleyn’s rise, reminding us how Henry had three Catholics and three Protestants executed on the same day, whilst always actually remaining a Catholic.

Indeed the quality of this programme demonstrates why Starkey should concentrate more on broadcasting about Henry VIII and Elizabeth I, not interpreting the “Roses” period on an “incomplete records” basis through a “Tudor” prism. Quite apart from Henry VII liking the accounting reference, he is the main reason that the records are now incomplete!

Tyndale and More – strange bedfellows….

 

Thomas More

Sir Thomas More

This link takes you to an interesting article about the fates of two great opposites, Sir Thomas More and William Tyndale. And, once again, Henry VIII’s lust for Anne Boleyn was at the heart of it.

 

Many endured Hell to bring us the Bible in English….

Wicliffe

It’s hard for us to believe now what danger men in the past faced in order to translate the Bible into English. We take it for granted that we can read every line in our own language, but it was not always so, as will be shown in the following link:
http://www.historyextra.com/article/feature/murderous-history-bible-translations?utm_source=Facebook+referral&utm_medium=Facebook.com&utm_campaign=Bitly

A little tale of mediaeval sleeping….

sleeping-in-the-Middle-Ages

Isn’t it strange the little stories one comes upon while researching? I was trawling through Stow’s Survey of London when I found this, concerning an incident in the Tower:-

“William Foxley slept in the tower 14 days & more without waking.

“In the yeare 1546. the 27 of April, being Tuesday in Easter weeke, William Foxley, Potmaker for the Mint in the tower of London, fell asleepe, and so continued sleeping, and could not be wakened, with pricking, cramping, or otherwise burning* whatsoeuer, till the first day of the tearme, which was full xiiii. dayes, and xv. nights, or more, for that Easter tearme beginneth not afore xvii. dayes after Easter. The cause of his thus sleeping could not be knowne, though the same were diligently searched after by the kings Phisitians, and other learned men: yea the king himselfe examining the said William Foxley, who was in all poynts found at his wakening to be as if hee had slept but one night. And he lived more then fortie yeares after in the sayde Tower, to wit, vntil the yeare of Christ, 1587, and then deceased on Wednesday in Easterweeke.”

How very odd! By the way, the king in question, Henry VIII, died less than a year after seeing William Foxley. As someone has said, imagine waking up from a deep sleep and finding Henry leaning over you! I think a heart attack would have seen poor Foxley off there and then.

* This was tried on one William Tyndale a few years earlier at the behest of the same King. It woke him up, but not for long.

Of human remains and another sinister reality behind a television programme

Actress_Molly_WeirI wonder how many listened to this programme a week or two ago? It was about the late diminutive Scottish actress Molly Weir who, between 1978 and 1984, played “Hazel McWitch” in the children’s comedy Rentaghost – you could tell it was a children’s comedy because one of the main characters died in the first few minutes of the opening episode, after a motorcycle accident.

Had she existed, McWitch, being Scottish, is likely to have been a victim of the campaign against witchcraft begun by James VI and to have been one of about 1700 burned between 1590 and 1722. Most were strangled before being burned, although William Tyndale could testify that this was not always effective.

In England, where witches were hanged instead, the total is usually estimated at 500 of a population four times that of Scotland. Quite apart from being less painful, even short-drop hanging preserved the body for future identification. The two convicted at the St. Osyth trial of 1582 are still being investigated to determine which witch is which, although it is now thought that the remains do not relate to Ursula Kemp

220px-Wickiana5and Elizabeth Bennet.

 

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