Cover Crush: The Flower of Chivalry by Georges Duby

  In previous years, Lisl took part in conversations with other bloggers and writers about book covers, regarding their importance and appeal. From these discussions the Cover Crush evolved amongst several participants, who began recording their thoughts on images that, for various reasons, caught and kept their attention. Today, Lisl shares her most recent Crush,… Continue reading Cover Crush: The Flower of Chivalry by Georges Duby

The many wonders of medieval Caversham

Caversham is just across the Thames from Reading. The present bridge carrying the main road between the two places is modern, but it is more or less on the site of a medieval stone and timber bridge, dating from between 1163 and 1231. Sources vary as to whether it had one, two or three chapels,… Continue reading The many wonders of medieval Caversham

THE THREE HUNDRED YEARS WAR – Part 1: the Devil’s brood

Preface I conceived this article as a defence of King Henry V against the accusation that he was a war criminal. It became apparent, however, that my research was drawing me away from Henry’s campaigns towards a broader study of the origin and causes of the Hundred Years War. Soon, I was reading material going… Continue reading THE THREE HUNDRED YEARS WAR – Part 1: the Devil’s brood

THE STRANGE LEGEND OF USK CASTLE

In a tiny town in Wales, a ruined castle stands on rising ground amidst a haze of dark trees. An atmospheric round tower, cracked  by time; shattered walls, the remains of hall and chapel. Privately owned, a garden drops down the hillside before it, to an old house  which appears to contain much castle stonework.… Continue reading THE STRANGE LEGEND OF USK CASTLE

The Greatest Knight and Richard III

I have previously posted about my family history connections with Richard III here and I have since found out more interesting links. One such is William Marshall. Called by some the greatest ever knight, he is one of my direct ancestors and also the direct ancestor of Richard III. William had an eventful life. He… Continue reading The Greatest Knight and Richard III

The wrong Philippa for Reading….!

Reading in Berkshire is apparently famous for, among other things, five varieties of potato. Nine other items for which Reading is renowned are listed here, and I presume that eight of them are correct. But the last one definitely is NOT! I quote: “Philippa Gregory, the woman who found the body of Richard III under a car… Continue reading The wrong Philippa for Reading….!

ENGLAND’S MINORITY KINGS 1216-1483

Introduction This essay was prompted by a sentence in John Ashdown-Hill’s latest book ‘The Private Life of Edward IV’: “ According to English custom, as the senior living adult prince of the blood royal, the duke of Gloucester should have acted as Regent — or Lord Protector as the role was then known in England… Continue reading ENGLAND’S MINORITY KINGS 1216-1483

Whilst researching my new biography of Henry III, a tantalising thought began to emerge from bits of evidence.

Was Henry III autistic? https://mattlewisauthor.wordpress.com/2016/10/17/was-henry-iii-autistic/ https://www.amazon.co.uk/Henry-III-Son-Magna-Carta/dp/1445653575

The Problem with ‘Usurpation’ (re-blogged from http://www.annettecarson.co.uk/357052370)

With my long-standing interest in treason and usurpation, I was fascinated to see the video of the mock trial of the Magna Carta barons staged in the wonderful surroundings of Westminster Hall on 31 July 2015.* I use the term ‘Magna Carta barons’ loosely, and indeed the trial itself could address only one arbitrary, early… Continue reading The Problem with ‘Usurpation’ (re-blogged from http://www.annettecarson.co.uk/357052370)