The origins of the White Rose of York?

According to Caroline Halstead in Richard III As Duke Of Gloucester And King of England, the White Rose derives from Clifford Castle (near Hay-on-Wye). It therefore came to the York family as part of their inheritance from the Mortimers, who had themselves inherited Clifford Castle. But why is Clifford Castle associated with a white rose?… Continue reading The origins of the White Rose of York?

Was Katherine Gordon called the “White Rose”….?

Wandering around the internet, as usual, I came upon this link , from which I have taken the following extract: “Perkin Warbeck was tried for treason on November 16 and executed on November 23, 1499. His head joined the lineup of traitors spanning the London Bridge. Warbeck’s wife had been living in Westminster for so… Continue reading Was Katherine Gordon called the “White Rose”….?

The King of England and the King of Glam!

If you know me, you will know that, apart from Richard III, I have a passion for Marc Bolan, the leader of the ’70s rock group, T.Rex, and the initiator of Glam Rock. I could just as easily have titled this post ‘Ricardus Rex and T.Rex’! Having been concentrating on Richard over the last few… Continue reading The King of England and the King of Glam!

The White Rose Of Mortimer?

Originally posted on RICARDIAN LOONS:
Most historians now accept that, while the white rose of York was a heraldic badge used by the house of York during the Wars of the Roses, the origins of the red rose of Lancaster can only be traced back to Henry VII.1 After his accession to the throne in…

A HATPIN & A MYSTERY

Edward IV’S Hatpin?   A fabulous archaeological find has turned up in a Lincolnshire fields–a beautiful golden hatpin shaped like the Sun in Splendour and bearing an intact amethyst stone. An extremely high status object without a doubt and estimated at £15,000. But whose was it? Unfortunately the article accompanying the find is full of… Continue reading A HATPIN & A MYSTERY

The inspiration for Richard III’s rosary….

The following article and extract are from Nerdalicious:   “ ‘In the nineteenth century the Clare Cross was found in the castle ruins. It’s actually a reliquary, containing a fragment of the True Cross, and it was probably made soon after 1450  so probably it belonged to Richard III’s mother. For that reason, when I… Continue reading The inspiration for Richard III’s rosary….

Heraldic “devices” of the House of York

The origins of these devices is set out in Richard III as Duke of Gloucester and King of England by Caroline A. Halsted, volume 1, pages 404-5. The source quoted is Archoelogia vol. xxii, p.226. The main change here is to convert the text into modern English: The dukedom of York – the falcon and… Continue reading Heraldic “devices” of the House of York

Most-Famous 20th-Century Tarot Deck Features Death’s Banner Emblazened with the White Rose of the House of York

The Rider-Waite-Smith Tarot Deck (RWS) is arguably the most famous of 20th-century Tarot decks. For decades, I’ve been using the RWS as an aid to developing fictional characters. Only recently did I notice the Death card in the Major Arcana features a skeletal knight carrying a banner on which is imprinted the White Rose of… Continue reading Most-Famous 20th-Century Tarot Deck Features Death’s Banner Emblazened with the White Rose of the House of York

A Visit to Bury St Edmunds (Part Two)

St Edmundsbury Cathedral, previously St James' Church

After we left Moyse’s Hall Museum, we wanted to visit St Mary’s Church, as we knew there was a wedding going on at the Cathedral. However, when we arrived, the church was closed a s a service was going on for the WI. By this time the bells of the Cathedral were ringing indicating the… Continue reading A Visit to Bury St Edmunds (Part Two)

Remembrance of a Wedding

Remembrance of a Wedding In the sleepy village of Stanford in the Vale, now in Oxfordshire, but formerly within the boundaries of Berkshire, stands one of the lesser known Ricardian sites. Stanford, like most English villages, is an ancient place. A corpse-path runs over the village green, and part of a cell once owned by… Continue reading Remembrance of a Wedding