The Kingmaker’s Anger

I’m working on a biography of Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick – the man best introduced as The Kingmaker. I have written on the Wars of the Roses, on Richard, Duke of York, and Richard III. Warwick has been a constant presence throughout. I spent some time in an earlier dispute over the throne of… Continue reading The Kingmaker’s Anger

The Audley Case of 1431 Redux

We originally posted on this issue here. In summary, in 1431 or thereabouts, Alianore, Lady Audley, and her husband James were trying to demonstrate in the Church court that Alianore was legitimate and thus the heiress of her father, Edmund, Earl of Kent by Constance of York. Kent’s surviving sisters and the heirs of the… Continue reading The Audley Case of 1431 Redux

The Traitor’s Arms?

In 1840 workmen carrying out repairs to St Bartholomew’s Church, Ashperton, Herefordshire were collecting stones from the ruins of a nearby manor house when they discovered a heavy stone plaque, carved with an elaborate coat of arms, among the rubble. The stone was taken to the church for safekeeping and has hung on the wall… Continue reading The Traitor’s Arms?

The Tudors were a “typically Welsh family”….!

 Today in 1495 marked the death of Henry VII’s uncle, Jasper Tudor, and so seems an appropriate day for me to post the following extract, which is from The Country Gentry in the Fourteenth Century by N. Denholm-Young, published in 1969. “…It is a crying fault among English historians that they pay only lip-service to… Continue reading The Tudors were a “typically Welsh family”….!

Part 2 of a review of Terry Breverton’s RICHARD III: THE KING IN THE CAR PARK….

Part 2 of a review by Myrna Smith, Ricardian Reading Editor, of Richard III: The King in the Car Park. EVISCERATING TERRY BREVERTON Being an elaboration, with examples, of some of the points made in Part I. Let’s get the more trivial criticisms out of the way first. Grammar: Pg. 82 –“Her son was only 14… Continue reading Part 2 of a review of Terry Breverton’s RICHARD III: THE KING IN THE CAR PARK….

The legitimisation of the Beauforts.

When Richard II and John of Gaunt decided (in view of the latter’s rather belated marriage to Katherine Swynford) that the Beauforts should be legitimated, they did two things. First they obtained a dispensation from the Pope removing any impediments to the Gaunt-Swynford marriage and legitimating the Beauforts. For example, the fact that Gaunt had… Continue reading The legitimisation of the Beauforts.