The Decline of Villeinage

The Peasants’ Revolt of 1381 is well-known, and it is often thought that the decline of serfdom, or villeinage, began at about this time. The truth is more complex. Like most English traditions, villeinage took a long time to pass and outlived its usefulness by many decades. Indeed Queen Elizabeth I still owned serfs –… Continue reading The Decline of Villeinage

Now available …

… on the Tewkesbury battlefield website: Wars of the Roses music by the Legendary Ten Seconds. Here is more information about the group and their output so far.

Gloucester’s contribution to the Battle of Tewkesbury….

This year is the 550th anniversary of the Battle of Tewkesbury, and—justifiably—Gloucester wants a piece of the celebratory action. After all, Gloucester did contribute a lot to the outcome, by ensuring Margaret and her forces were obliged to take a stand in a place they wouldn’t have chosen. The queen wanted to pass through the… Continue reading Gloucester’s contribution to the Battle of Tewkesbury….

Some ghosts of Oxfordshire, but try Gloucestershire for size too….

  It seems that Oxfordshire is one of our most haunted county. Maybe. But I know of a few that would claim more ghosts. At the risk of irritating a whole bunch of folk, I’ll say my next-door county of Gloucestershire has the most ghosts of all. OK, OK, don’t all shout and wave your… Continue reading Some ghosts of Oxfordshire, but try Gloucestershire for size too….

Medieval spies….

Thanks to a post on the Richard III Society Forum, I was steered to the following interesting Ian Arthurson article about medieval spying. We know that the Tudors excelled in this dangerous world, but it’s not so well known that it was quite rife during the Wars of the Roses as well. Royalty—and the Church—always… Continue reading Medieval spies….

New Wars of the Roses postage stamps showing Graham Turner’s magnificent paintings….!

Wow! These new postage stamps are brilliant. So colourful and truly interesting. Well done whoever chose to do this, and well done even more Graham Turner for his amazing paintings. Among the other battle scenes depicted are Wakefield, Towton, First Battle of St Albans, Tewkesbury and Northampton.

The 550th anniversary of the Battle of Tewkesbury….!

  Take note everyone, this is from the Tewkesbury Battlefield Society: “….In the run up to the 550th anniversary we are running a day by day information page on the progress of both the Yorkist and Lancastrian manoeuvres prior to the meeting at Tewkesbury. To find out more and to receive these updates visit our… Continue reading The 550th anniversary of the Battle of Tewkesbury….!

A CASTLE SAVED AT CODNOR

I first heard of Codnor Castle some 40 years ago…and never went there. At the time, the only info I had said it was ‘just foundations’ so I passed on by. It was only in the last two years I realised there was in fact large, standing masonry including towers of this once-imposing castle. However,… Continue reading A CASTLE SAVED AT CODNOR

Gloucester on 28th October, 1378, 1483 and 1967….

28th October is a notable day for me because of three events in Gloucester’s history:- (1) It was the day my second favourite king, Richard II was in Gloucester and Tewkesbury—well, he was from 20th October 1378 until mid-November, so had to be in one or the other on the 28th. (2) It was also… Continue reading Gloucester on 28th October, 1378, 1483 and 1967….

The Royal Progress of Richard III

Following his coronation, Richard III – like all medieval monarchs – went on his “royal progress” through the realm.  Along with an entourage in excess of 200 household men, ecclesiastics, supporters, and administrative officials, he visited towns and cities as far west as the River Severn, as far north as the River Ouse, and as… Continue reading The Royal Progress of Richard III