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Dyer or Dire?

Many of you will remember the episode of “Who do you think you are” in which Danny Dyer was revealed as a descendant of Edward III. In this new two part series, he “meets” a few prominent ancestors, some even more distant.

The first episode began with Rollo, ancestor of the Dukes of Normandy, which saw Dyer visit Sweden, although Danes and Norwegians also claim that Viking dynast, to learn sparring with a sword and shield. Then he went to the Tower to talk about William I and Dover Castle for Henry II, discussing his rebellious sons and his mixed relationship with Becket. At every stage, riding a horse, jousting or dyeing (Dyeing?), he was accompanied by a professional genealogist (Anthony Adolph, in a cafe opposite Buckingham Palace) or a historian, if not one of television’s “usual suspects”. At the end, Dyer visited France to learn of a slightly different ancestor – St. Louis IX, although Margaret of Wessex is another canonised forebear.

The second episode did feature some real historians: Elizabeth Norton, Chris Given-Wilson, Tobias Capwell and Tracy Borman. The opening scene had Isabella on the Leeds Castle drawbridge shouting at Edward II (Dyer): “Git aht ov moi carsel” (you may need Google Translate, but not from French). We were shown an image of Hugh le Despencer’s grisly execution, without pointing out that there were two of that name, followed by Edward’s confinement in Berkeley Castle, forced abdication and the legend of his even grislier end. Henry “Hotspur” Percy, who died in battle at Shrewsbury, followed as Dyer tried on late mediaeval armour. The next scenes concerned Sir John Seymour at Wolf Hall, inveigling his daughter into Henry VIII’s world, as Dyer dressed up and tried “Tudor” dancing. We then moved on to Helmingham Hall as Catherine Cromwell married Lord Tollemache, whose successor met Dyer, his cousin, again. The series concluded with a “sugar banquet” as the star’s family joined in, dressed as Elizabeth I’s contemporaries.

Both programmes were informative about mediaeval life, such as the “silver pennies” bearing Dyer’s image and the West Ham badge, although his stereotypical East London patois grates a little. It brought to mind Ray Winstone as Henry VIII (“I have been betrayed!”) or Nick Knowles‘ egregious Historyonics.

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Sundogs over Stockholm in 1535. . .

Stockholm Sundogs - 1535

When I actually saw sundogs for the first time my own previous knowledge of such things concerned the famous three suns seen at the Battle of Mortimer’s Cross in Herefordshire on 2nd February 1461. The quick-thinking Edward, Duke of York (soon to be King Edward IV) claimed the phenomenon as a sign of the Holy Trinity, signifying that God was on his side. Ever after, Edward adopted the “sun in splendour” as one of his badges.

Now I have learned of another instance of three suns, this time in Stockholm, on 20th April, 1535. There is a painting of this event, known in Swedish as the Vädersolstavlan, which means “the sun dog painting”.

To read more, go to http://dreamdogsart.typepad.com/art/2012/06/v%C3%A4dersolstavlan-the-sun-dog-painting.htmland

https://www.reddit.com/r/atoptics/comments/6htqij/the_sun_dog_painting_the_oldest_depiction_of/

There are numerous sites concerning this momentous event in Stockholm’s history.

A video of a modern parhelion can be seen here.

A GOLDEN GOWN

Queen Margaret (also known as Margrethe and Margareta) was a Scandinavian queen who died in the early 15th century.

Briefly she was monarch of Sweden, Norway and Denmark and earned herself the title of ‘the Lady King.’ Her only son died young and hence her heir became Eric of Pomerania; it was her desire to have him make a marriage alliance with Philippa of England, Henry IV’s daughter, and possibly at the same time match Eric’s sister Catherine to Henry’s son, the future Henry V. However, only  the first marriage to Philippa took place.

Margaret died aged around 59 while on board her ship during in the middle of a war; no one knows for sure what killed her, and some contemporaries said she had been poisoned by Eric.

Over the years her reputation has been debated by historians, with some calling her ‘Machiavellian’ while others praise her strong leadership qualities.

What she did leave behind was a stunning golden gown, which has survived intact to this day. A replica has been made in order that it can be worn by a model.

 

queendress

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