A visit to Beccles (2016)

Originally posted on Mid Anglia Group, Richard III Society:
To visit this town, by the southern extremity of the Broads, the Group assembled at the King’s Head, a short walk from Beccles station on the East Suffolk Line. After this, we met Murray’s late grandfather James Woodrow, local historian, to show us around the town.…

SIR JAMES TYRELL – CHILD KILLER OR PROVIDER OF A SAFE HOUSE ?

Reblogged from A Medieval Potpourri sparkypus.com  15th century stained glass from  great east window St Nicholas Chapel, Gipping.  Did Elizabeth Wydeville gaze up at this very window if the family tradition is correct.    Photo thanks to Gerry Morris @ Flikr While there is much information on Sir James  Tyrell, c.1455-1502  available,  unfortunately some of… Continue reading SIR JAMES TYRELL – CHILD KILLER OR PROVIDER OF A SAFE HOUSE ?

The lost city of Dunwich….

Why are we so fascinated by the thought of lands and cities lost beneath the sea? Such tales are both compelling and a little frightening, but have always been around. No doubt they always will be. I’ve always been particularly intrigued by stories of the land of Lyonesse, but this article is about Dunwich, which… Continue reading The lost city of Dunwich….

Where is Anne Boleyn’s heart….?

According to this article Anne Boleyn’s heart was not buried with her, but somewhere else, as yet unknown/unconfirmed. I confess to being startled, because I hadn’t heard of this before, but it seems two places in England vie for being the heart’s resting place. They are the Church of St Mary in Ewarton, Suffolk, and… Continue reading Where is Anne Boleyn’s heart….?

The Crown Jewels of East Anglia?

This excellent EADT article suggests that a horde found near Tamworth about ten years ago included some crown jewels worn by Anna* or Onna, the (Wuffing) King of East Anglia and nephew of Raedwald. He is likely to have died in a 653/4 battle near Blythburgh, along with his Bishop, Thomas, fighting against Penda’s pagan… Continue reading The Crown Jewels of East Anglia?

So where exactly is “Orwell”?

Harwich Town station is the end of the line, a twenty-five minute ride from Manningtree and the north-eastern extremity of Essex. As you cross the main road from the station car park, turning left takes you past a series of old buildings with Harwich Society plaques amid a modern setting. Some of these commemorate people such… Continue reading So where exactly is “Orwell”?

The latest on the hunt for Richard’s Y-chromosome

Lionel of Antwerp, Duke of Clarence, was born today in 1338, although he died just before his thirtieth birthday. He is, of course, a mixed-line direct ancestor of Richard III but he is the brother of Edmund of Langley, Richard’s male-line great grandfather. Here, John Ashdown-Hill spoke to Nerdalicious about his attempts to locate Lionel… Continue reading The latest on the hunt for Richard’s Y-chromosome

Anyone for tennis?

There is an issue with Edmund the Martyr, King of East Anglia, who was shot and beheaded by Vikings, today in 869. He isn’t England’s patron saint, although he is far more English than St. George, who is thought to have originated in modern-day Turkey or Syria. However, unlike St. Edward the Confessor, whose brother-in-law… Continue reading Anyone for tennis?

Witchcraft (3): Matthew Hopkins

If the witchcraft trials at North Berwick in the 1590s and later in England, of which Pendle in 1610 is an example, happened because James VI/I fervently believed in witchcraft, as shown by the three characters in Macbeth, it can be argued that the subsequent decline in such cases came because judges and Charles I… Continue reading Witchcraft (3): Matthew Hopkins