ELIZABETH TALBOT, VISCOUNTESS LISLE, LADY ELEANOR BUTLER’S NIECE

Reblogged from A Medieval Potpourri sparkypus.com   Possible portrait of Elizabeth Talbot, Viscountess Lisle c1468 Petrus Christus of Bruge Gemäldegalerie, Berlin.  Note the gleam of the pearls, the pattern of the brocade gown and the little gold pin used for pinning the fine lawn partlet onto the bodice.  How delicious! Could this charming portrait  be of Elizabeth… Continue reading ELIZABETH TALBOT, VISCOUNTESS LISLE, LADY ELEANOR BUTLER’S NIECE

A CASTLE SAVED AT CODNOR

I first heard of Codnor Castle some 40 years ago…and never went there. At the time, the only info I had said it was ‘just foundations’ so I passed on by. It was only in the last two years I realised there was in fact large, standing masonry including towers of this once-imposing castle. However,… Continue reading A CASTLE SAVED AT CODNOR

The mystery of the vanished manor of Ostenhanger….

  There once was an Anglo-Saxon manor in the south of Kent called Berwic, which became known as Le Hangre, and was then split into two manors, Westenhanger and Ostenhanger. Westenhanger is still very much in evidence (see illustration above) but Ostenhanger as such has disappeared entirely. It’s still there really, of course, but was… Continue reading The mystery of the vanished manor of Ostenhanger….

JOAN NEVILLE, SISTER TO THE KINGMAKER.

Updated Post at sparkypus.com A Medieval Potpourri https://sparkypus.com/2020/05/14/joan-neville-sister-to-the-kingmaker-2/ The effigies of Joan Neville and her husband William Fitzalan, Earl of Arundel.  On a recent visit to the Fitzalan Chapel, Arundel, I stood transfixed at Joan Neville’s beautiful monument.  Carved from Caen stone.  Joan’s effigy lies next to that of her husband, William Fitzalan Earl of Arundel… Continue reading JOAN NEVILLE, SISTER TO THE KINGMAKER.

The Kingmaker’s almshouses….

When looking into the history of Burford in Oxfordshire, I came upon this site. One wonders if the great Richard Neville, born 22nd November 1428, ever actually saw the result of his charity. “The most conspicuous charitable act in late medieval Burford was the foundation in 1455–6 of the Great Almshouse (or Warwick Almshouses) near the church,… Continue reading The Kingmaker’s almshouses….

Thomas Stanley, or, the man with the evil beard….

For anyone interested in knowing what made slippery Lord Stanley tick, here is an excellent evaluation, save that Sir William was executed for refusing to oppose “Perkin”, not for supporting him. The man was a born opportunist and survivor. Full stop. Oh, and he had an evil beard!  

BLOOD OF ROSES (A Novella of Edward IV’s Victory at Towton)

Richard, Duke of York and his second son Edmund were killed at the battle of Wakefield at the bitter end of  1460. Within weeks, the Duke’s eldest son Edward was on the road with a mighty army, seeking revenge–and a crown. The novella BLOOD OF  ROSES by J.P. Reedman covers the period  from the Duke’s… Continue reading BLOOD OF ROSES (A Novella of Edward IV’s Victory at Towton)

I Would Rather See the Hunting of a Duck…

Certain ‘books’ (ahem) often go on about Richard III’s supposed unpopularity and describe his brother Edward IV in glowing terms, putting him forth as a universally loved and admired monarch. (Even worse are those writers who make the brave, ruthless, warrior-King Edward into  some kind of hapless old duffer, totally cowed and pushed about by… Continue reading I Would Rather See the Hunting of a Duck…

A Grey Day

The Grey family, originally from Northumberland, are a consistent feature of English history from the Southampton plot of 1415 to Monmouth’s rebellion nearly three centuries later. Sir Thomas Grey (1384-1415) of Castle Heaton was a soldier and one of the three principals in the Southampton plot against Henry V, revealed to him by Edmund Mortimer,… Continue reading A Grey Day

No more chocolate-box boys in the Tower, PLEASE….!

  And to cap it all, we even have Kittens in the Tower! Oh, for heaven’s sake! Right, there is a famous “story” about one of our 15th-century princes of Wales, specifically Edward of Lancaster (or Westminster), seven-year-old son and heir of Henry VI and Margaret of Anjou. The fame goes that after the 2nd Battle… Continue reading No more chocolate-box boys in the Tower, PLEASE….!