Mysterious Minster Lovell in the mist….

  It doesn’t seem possible now that it was 30th April 2014 when my late husband and I paid an early-morning visit to Minster Lovell. There was a mist and we were virtually alone. The River Windrush, surely one of the loveliest little rivers in England, whispered past the old ruins of Sir Francis Lovell‘s… Continue reading Mysterious Minster Lovell in the mist….

It’s 1773, and Richard III is King of Great Britain….!

  Could someone tell me how a document from 1773 could be signed by “King Richard III of Great Britain”? I rather think it’s a goof for George III. Richard didn’t know about Great Britain (George III had England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales—oh, and Hanover, Richard didn’t have Scotland or Hanover, but claimed France), So… Continue reading It’s 1773, and Richard III is King of Great Britain….!

Sir Bevis Bulmer – son of Smithfield

Bevis Bulmer certainly didn’t have a good start in life. He was about one when his parents were executed for high treason on the same day in May 1537, having been caught up in the Pilgrimage of Grace. Sir John, from a prominent Yorkshire family, was hanged and beheaded whilst Margaret, his mother who may… Continue reading Sir Bevis Bulmer – son of Smithfield

Sir John Dalton and the wealthy widow….

  I have seen the above painting used an an illustration for the abduction of Guinevere. All that’s lacking are the fluffy kittens with pink satin bows. If it was really a medieval abduction, it wouldn’t be anything resembling this idyllic springtime scene, but much more likely to be as the illustration below! I’ve posted… Continue reading Sir John Dalton and the wealthy widow….

THE LOST CHAPEL OF THE PRINCE BISHOPS

Once upon a time, in the 13th century, in the grounds of Auckland Castle, there stood a mighty northern chapel that was almost as large as St George’s at Windsor and bigger than St Stephen’s Chapel at Westminster. The Prince-Archbishop Antony Bek was its founder, a man so powerful it was said by some that… Continue reading THE LOST CHAPEL OF THE PRINCE BISHOPS

Henry VII, the posh schoolboy….?

This Kent Online article, about Sir Henry Wyatt (1460–1536) of Allington Castle, seems to be anti-Richard, but actually goes some way to exonerating him. And while I having sneaking admiration for the cat (see illustration below) which saved Wyatt from starvation in prison by bringing him pigeons, she isn’t what riveted my attention on the… Continue reading Henry VII, the posh schoolboy….?

How would Thetford Priory have looked?

Thetford Priory was, of course, a Cluniac Priory. Whilst some walls stand away from the entrance, in other areas only the foundations remain and the Mowbray tomb locations are no longer marked, although those of the Howards, moved to Framlingham, remain. If only, I hear you say, some kind of restoration could take place. That would… Continue reading How would Thetford Priory have looked?

Detectorist finds Bronze Age treasure in Scotland….

And still these detectorists keep coming up with the goods. Now it’s a Bronze Age wonder. “….on June 21, 2020, an amateur metal detectorist uncovered an exceptionally rare Bronze Age treasure hoard in a field near the village of  Peebles, about 22 miles (36 kilometers) south of Edinburgh. The prize of this Bronze Age treasure cache… Continue reading Detectorist finds Bronze Age treasure in Scotland….

“Bone Detectives” come to Ipswich …

… and other venues, with Tori Herridge and Raksha Dave. This Channel Four series, which consists of five episodes, begins at Stoke Quay on the town’s Waterfront where a long-forgotten (St. Augustine’s) burial ground was fully explored before some new buildings were constructed. Three bodies in particular were examined: 1) A wealthy man buried in… Continue reading “Bone Detectives” come to Ipswich …

THE THREE HUNDRED YEARS WAR – PART 2: the just cause  

  Preface This is the second of three articles charting the course of continual Anglo-French conflict from the twelfth to the fifteenth centuries. In the first article, I wrote about the rise and fall of the Angevin Empire, culminating in the Treaty of Paris (1259). This article picks up my narrative after the death of… Continue reading THE THREE HUNDRED YEARS WAR – PART 2: the just cause