Edward V and Coldridge: the evidence so far

Thanks to this Daily Telegraph article last December, the world is now far more aware of  the distinct possibility that the former Edward V lived on as “John Evans” at Coldridge in Devon into the reign of Henry VIII, his nephew, as a parker minding deer for his half-brother Thomas Grey, Marquess of Dorset. In… Continue reading Edward V and Coldridge: the evidence so far

CICELY PLANTAGENET – NOT SO FORTUNATE AS FAIR.

Reblogged from A Medieval Potpourri sparkypus.com Stained glass portrait of Cicely.  Formerly in Canterbury Cathedral now in the Burrell Collection, Glasgow. Cicely Plantagenet (b.1469 d.1507) daughter and niece to kings, and a prime example of a medieval noblewoman who endured and in this case survived the turmoil of the Wars of the Roses.    Oh how that… Continue reading CICELY PLANTAGENET – NOT SO FORTUNATE AS FAIR.

Myths aren’t facts; least of all myths about Richard III….

Ricardians often bemoan the repeated myths about Richard’s wickedness and cruelty. And with good reason. In spite of the fact that he did what he could to better the lot of women, he is accused of bullying the poor old (treacherous) Countess of Oxford because she happened to be financing her Lancastrian son who was… Continue reading Myths aren’t facts; least of all myths about Richard III….

PERKIN WARBECK AND THE ASSAULTS ON THE GATES OF EXETER

Reblogged from A Medieval Potpourri sparkypus.com This is thought to be a portrait of Perkin Warbeck/Richard Duke of York from the Tournament Tapestry at Valenciennes Perkin Warbeck.  Pencil sketch c1560.  Note the eye blemish in both portraits. Following on from my earlier post and the high likelihood that John Evans ,who lies buried in Coldridge Church Devon,  was… Continue reading PERKIN WARBECK AND THE ASSAULTS ON THE GATES OF EXETER

SIR JAMES TYRELL – CHILD KILLER OR PROVIDER OF A SAFE HOUSE ?

Reblogged from A Medieval Potpourri sparkypus.com  15th century stained glass from  great east window St Nicholas Chapel, Gipping.  Did Elizabeth Wydeville gaze up at this very window if the family tradition is correct.    Photo thanks to Gerry Morris @ Flikr While there is much information on Sir James  Tyrell, c.1455-1502  available,  unfortunately some of… Continue reading SIR JAMES TYRELL – CHILD KILLER OR PROVIDER OF A SAFE HOUSE ?

What really happened in 1385, when the Earl of Stafford’s son and heir was killed on a Yorkshire road…?

On Sunday, 16th July 1385 (maybe 18th) there was an incident at Bustardthorpe, which is south of York on the road to Bishopthorpe, where King Richard II was staying at the (arch)bishop’s palace. A large portion of his army and nobles were encamped close by because the English were en route for Scotland, intending to… Continue reading What really happened in 1385, when the Earl of Stafford’s son and heir was killed on a Yorkshire road…?

My Questions About Richard III.

If Richard was planning to seize the throne all along why did he a.) start by getting everyone in Yorkshire to swear allegiance to Edward V and b.) set off south with only a modest retinue of 300 men? Given that he was in a position to raise most of the north in arms, wouldn’t… Continue reading My Questions About Richard III.

Another piece …

… on two of the major rebellions – Simnel and “Perkin” – against Henry VII. This article is from Voyager of History and we may soon be in a better position to know whether Richard of Shrewsbury could have been at Tyburn in 1499. During the same reign, there was also the Stafford-Lovell rebellion starting… Continue reading Another piece …

Murder and mayhem in medieval London…

UPDATED POST ON sparkypus.com A Medieval Potpourri https://sparkypus.com/2020/05/22/murder-and-mayhem-in-medieval-london/ Here is a link to an interesting map and article on the murder hotspots of medieval London.  Click on a dot and details pop up of that particular murder. Most of the culprits either just simply disappeared pronto or skedaddled into sanctuary and  frustratingly the outcomes are… Continue reading Murder and mayhem in medieval London…

Spot the deliberate mistakes?

An article in British History Online , as illustrated by this John Zephaniah Bell painting says: “Here [Westminster Abbey/Sanctuary/Cheyneygates] the unhappy queen [Elizabeth Woodville] was induced by the Duke of Buckingham and the Archbishop of York to surrender her little son, Edward V., to his uncle Richard, who carried him to the Tower, where the two… Continue reading Spot the deliberate mistakes?