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Archive for the tag “Rubens”

The lost palace of Whitehall brought back to life….

Whitehall lost palace - Hendrick Danckerts

To cut a long story short, this site  (5th July 2016) relates that Historic Royal Palaces has embarked upon a project to allow visitors to explore the Palace of Whitehall, which was largely destroyed by fire in the late 17th century.  I hope that by now it is fact, and available.

Whitehall, which was destroyed by fire in 1698, began life as York Place, and was the Westminster residence of Cardinal Wolsey.Whitehall - as York PlaceYork Place

Here is the Historic Royal Palaces website.  Now, I’m not sure exactly what is meant by allowing “visitors to explore the Palace of Whitehall”, so cannot explain more. It covers Whitehall Palace, but whether or not it is in the form promised by the citymetric site, I cannot say.

Whitehall - from St James's Park, by DanckertsAnother view of Whitehall, from St James’s Park, by Danckerts 1625-1680

Whitehall - The Lord Mayor's Water-Procession on the Thames c1683The Lord Mayor’s Water-Procession on the Thames at Whitehall c1683

A cursed title?

This very informative BBC documentary, presented by Dr. Bendor Grosvenor, showed how a portrait, presently on display in Glasgow, was proved to be an original Rubens.  George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham, was a courtier and soldier, serving under both James VI/I and Charles I as well as being a possible partner of the former. He was assassinated in 1628 and the portrait (left) dates from about three years before this.

Villiers’ line fared no better than their predecessors in their tenure of the Buckingham title. Just as two of the three Stafford Dukes were executed and one killed at Northampton over their 67 years, Villiers’ son went into exile in France after serving in Charles II’s “CABAL” – he left no male heir and both his brothers had already died without issue. The title was recreated, with Normanby, for John Sheffield in 1703 but his male line expired in 1735 whilst Richard Grenville’s family held it, with Chandos, from 1822-89.

Art, Passion and Power: The Story of the Royal Collection

Andrew Graham-Dixon has been on our screens for almost a quarter of a century; – he is tall, slightly grey, drawls a little and is an excellent art historian. His latest series tells the story of the Royal art collection – from Henry VIII and Holbein, Charles I and van Dyck, the Protectorate selling the collection off but Charles II rebuilding it, William III, the “I hate all boets and bainters” years of George II, George III’s careful acquisitions, George IV and Brighton, Prince Albert and the (profitable) Great Exhibition funding many London colleges, right up to the present day with Queen Mary and her dolls’ houses. Sadly, it says little about the pre-1509 era, although there is or was surely something from then in the collection.

If you cannot access the iPlayer for geographic reasons, or are too late, all four parts should now be on YouTube OneTube.

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