The demolition of the medieval Bow Bridge, Leicester, that Richard would have crossed….

The old myth about Richard striking his heel against Bow Bridge on his way to Bosworth, and then his head on the same place when being carried ignominiously back to Leicester after the battle, is very well known indeed. As is the supposed prediction of this sequence of events by an old woman in the… Continue reading The demolition of the medieval Bow Bridge, Leicester, that Richard would have crossed….

Were the Houses of York and Lancaster true Plantagenets or not….?

When reading the Yorkshire post I came upon the following sentence: “It’s thought that the white rose was adopted as a symbol in the 14th century, when it was introduced by Edmund of Langley, the first Duke of York and founder of the House of York, a dynasty related to the Plantagenet kings.” Related to… Continue reading Were the Houses of York and Lancaster true Plantagenets or not….?

Tales of a Ricardian Traveler – Debunking a Myth at Dartington Hall

Originally posted on RICARDIAN LOONS:
Lady on Horseback, mid-15th c., British Museum Dartington Hall, near Totnes in Devon and just southeast of Dartmoor National Park, represents a uniquely British form of historical contradiction. It is both medieval, having parts of a Grade I-listed late 14th century manor house, and modern, being the current home of…

JFK Parallels

A Ricardian author, C J Lock, has long been interested in John F Kennedy and has kindly given permission to reproduce her post about the parallels between JFK and Richard III. “On the anniversary of the death of John Fitzgerald Kennedy , it struck me that there are many similarities between two of my personal… Continue reading JFK Parallels

“The Wars of the Roses” by Ashdown-Hill

This new book looks at the characters, motivations, events and nomenclature of the Wars of the Roses, as we now know them. It confronts the great cliche that the series of battles began in 1455 and ended in 1485, demonstrating convincingly that it was still in progress decades later. Despite the fame of the Henry… Continue reading “The Wars of the Roses” by Ashdown-Hill

This Gentill Day Dawes

For fans of historical music one of the highlights of the reinterment festivities in Leicester earlier this year was “Concert for a King”, an evening with music from the time of Richard III performed by the a capella group Aitone and guest instrumentalist Susan Burns, with contemporary texts read by Dr. Tony Bentley. It took… Continue reading This Gentill Day Dawes