The art that made us

This is another fascinating BBC2 series, illustrating English and British history through the evolution of our art. The eight one-hour episodes, narrated by David Threlfall (Men of the World), feature:The Roman and pre-Roman periods, Beowulf, the Norman conquest and the Bayeux Tapestry;     The Black Death, Wilton Diptych, Piers Plowman, Chaucer, Julian of Norwich,… Continue reading The art that made us

More coins found in Suffolk

Gaius Julius Caesar (left) may not have spent much time in Britain during his invasions of 55-54 BC, but his troops and their followers left rather a lot of evidence. Here, the East Anglian Daily Times details a hoard found in Ashbocking during 2019, consisting of 180 silver denarii and provisionally valued at £65,000.

Leaks, thistles and crosses of all kinds….

No, I haven’t made a boo-boo, the subject line of this article from Inside Wales Sport does indeed say “leaks”. A friend has wondered if this means Wales is a land in dire need of plumbers! This was a clear invitation to examine the rest of the article for further bloopers. I’ll start with England’s… Continue reading Leaks, thistles and crosses of all kinds….

London’s Greatest Bridges (with Rob Bell)

The series began at London Bridge itself. From an engineering perspective, Bell explained that the wooden Claudian bridge was the first across the Thames , built on no fewer than twenty-nine artificial islands, making it very difficult to negotiate. It was replaced with a very similar stone unit by Henry II. The Haberdashers were very… Continue reading London’s Greatest Bridges (with Rob Bell)

Two thousand years of Southwark Cathedral….

Southwark Cathedral, although only just across the Thames from St Paul’s and Westminster, has never received the same close attention of its rivals. At least, so it seems to me. Then, at the turn of the millenium, excavations began that led archaeologists back through time. A long time, because the cathedral’s beginnings stretch back over… Continue reading Two thousand years of Southwark Cathedral….

The prospect of an exciting new dig at York….!

The York Archaeological Society is hoping that an important new dig in the city is going to attract thousands of tourists. It will be an excavation into the city’s Roman history, and being outdoors will be an advantage in these times of Covid 19 restrictions. This can only be a good thing when so many… Continue reading The prospect of an exciting new dig at York….!

“Bone Detectives” come to Ipswich …

… and other venues, with Tori Herridge and Raksha Dave. This Channel Four series, which consists of five episodes, begins at Stoke Quay on the town’s Waterfront where a long-forgotten (St. Augustine’s) burial ground was fully explored before some new buildings were constructed. Three bodies in particular were examined: 1) A wealthy man buried in… Continue reading “Bone Detectives” come to Ipswich …

Traces of the Romans found during extensive work under York’s Guildhall….

  A £15.5 million construction project is in progress, to restore York’s Guildhall, which has stood on the banks of the River Ouse for centuries. Certainly it was known by Richard III, who visited the building during his reign. And who lived in Yorkshire for many years as the Duke of Gloucester, of course. Archaeologists… Continue reading Traces of the Romans found during extensive work under York’s Guildhall….

Richard and Greyfriars both lost in Leicester—and found again….!

Here are Historic England’s ten top archaeological discoveries of the decade. Needless to say, the discovery of Richard III’s remains figures high on the list. He’d been thought to have been buried in Leicester Greyfriars…or maybe thrown into the River Soar! But no, Greyfriars was the place. However, what I didn’t know was that Greyfriars… Continue reading Richard and Greyfriars both lost in Leicester—and found again….!