Richard II went berserk in Salisbury….?

  Richard III’s predecessor, Richard II, shares with him the injustice of being maligned through history. In Richard II’s case all we hear that he was a hysterical madman who was rightly removed from his throne (and this world) by his cousin Henry, Duke of Lancaster, who became Henry IV. All sorts of scenarios are… Continue reading Richard II went berserk in Salisbury….?

A mysterious book by Anonymous….

Right, there I was on a hot July afternoon, hunched over my laptop searching Amazon for anything that might apply to “Duke of Ireland”. I was becoming desperate, and had already searched every word combination that came to mind. And what turns up? A mystery book entitled The Queen’s Progress , written by the author… Continue reading A mysterious book by Anonymous….

The Renaissance, wedding dresses….and Robert de Vere….

  Well, I wasn’t looking for observations on when the Renaissance commenced, rather was I trying to find information on the wedding of Robert de Vere, Duke of Ireland, Marquess of Dublin, and 9th Earl of Oxford KG. The wording of my Google search brought up a site in which I found the following: “….During… Continue reading The Renaissance, wedding dresses….and Robert de Vere….

Philippa de Coucy

One of Edward III’s many grandchildren, Philippa de Coucy (born before April 1367) was the daughter of the important French nobleman Enguerrand, Lord of Coucy, by Isabella, eldest daughter of King Edward and Queen Philippa. Isabella was pretty much the definition of a spoiled princess, and contrary to the usual stereotype, pretty much did as… Continue reading Philippa de Coucy

Agnes Lancecrona and Robert de Vere

Robert de Vere (1362-1392) Earl of Oxford, found great favour with Richard II and was elevated first to the title of Marquess of Dublin and then in October 1386 to the dukedom of Ireland. This was the very first dukedom awarded outside the immediate royal family, and was, in effect, a “fingers up” to Richard’s… Continue reading Agnes Lancecrona and Robert de Vere

TREASON 1 – The Merciless Parliament 1388

 Introduction Treason is a terrible crime. It denotes a betrayal so wicked as to be unforgivable. In medieval England a traitor was executed with the maximum of corporeal pain and all his goods and chattels were forfeited to the crown, thus disinheriting his heirs and successors forever. Henry de Bracton a thirteenth century English jurist,… Continue reading TREASON 1 – The Merciless Parliament 1388