THE STONOR PAPERS, LOVE LETTERS THEREIN..

Reblogged from A Medieval Potpourri sparkypus.com Being of somewhat a silly old romantic I was pleasantly surprised to read in the blurb of Kingsford’s Stonor Letter and Papers 1290-1483 that there were love letters to be found among them. And what could possibly be nicer than a medieval love letter? And there they were, letters from… Continue reading THE STONOR PAPERS, LOVE LETTERS THEREIN..

THE SIX SISTERS OF WARWICK THE KINGMAKER

REBLOGGED FROM A MEDIEVAL POTPOURRI @ sparkypus.com Joan Neville and her husband William Fitzalan Earl of Arundel lie together to this day in their beautiful tomb in the chapel at Arundel Castle. Richard Neville, Earl of Salisbury (d. 1460) and his wife Alice Montacute had 10 children, including two sons, Richard Earl of Warwick and John… Continue reading THE SIX SISTERS OF WARWICK THE KINGMAKER

Let’s compare Anne Neville and Elizabeth Woodville, the two queens of York . . . .

“ . . . . The role of consort can make or break a monarchy. Some have seen their reign saved by the energies of their spouse while others have seen their power waver because of their consort’s actions. Here, we look at the consorts of the House of York . . . .” Thus… Continue reading Let’s compare Anne Neville and Elizabeth Woodville, the two queens of York . . . .

The strange story of the Stanley boy….

Yes, very strange, because there are conflicting histories of this effigy and tomb shown in the image above. The tomb is in St Peter’s Church, Elford, Staffordshire, and both it and the effigy are rather small and therefore generally believed to be that of a child. The story is that the dead boy was John… Continue reading The strange story of the Stanley boy….

Yet another C17 coincidence

The English Civil War often looked like Round Two of the Wars of the Roses with, geographically, Yorkists morphing into Parliamentarians and Lancastrians becoming Royalists. One parliamentary commander was a Richard Neville and another bore the name of Ralph Assheton, as we shall show, descended from the Vice-Constable of the 1480s: Colonel Assheton, of Middleton,… Continue reading Yet another C17 coincidence

Bamburgh Castle Roundhouse Excavation

Bamburgh Castle is a site with a long, frequently dramatic history. A wooden Saxon fortress built by Ida the Flame-bearer, a place frequented by saints such as Oswald and Aidan, a seemingly impregnable fortress attacked by William Rufus with his siege castle ‘Evil Neighbour’, and the first English castle to fall to cannon-fire, when Warwick… Continue reading Bamburgh Castle Roundhouse Excavation

THE RISE AND FALL OF WILLIAM LORD HASTINGS AND HIS CASTLE OF KIRBY MUXLOE

Reblogged from A Medieval Potpourri sparkypus.com   The atmospheric ruins of Kirby Muxloe Castle, showing the moat, the gatehouse and the only tower to near completion .. Kirby Muxloe Castle, lies in Leicestershire countryside,  in ruins, the unfinished project of William, Lord Hastings.  Hastings was the epitome of a successful and powerful  15th century lord.… Continue reading THE RISE AND FALL OF WILLIAM LORD HASTINGS AND HIS CASTLE OF KIRBY MUXLOE

Elizabeth Hopton, Countess of Worcester, died 1498.

Elizabeth Hopton happens to be the present author’s 14th Great Grandmother, which prompted an interest in her. I think it is fair to say she is little-known. Of course, she did not (to our knowledge) involve herself in national politics, become the King’s mistress, murder the Princes in the Tower or get in trouble for… Continue reading Elizabeth Hopton, Countess of Worcester, died 1498.

MINSTER LOVELL HALL, HOME TO FRANCIS LOVELL VISCOUNT LOVELL

Reblogged from sparkypus.com A Medieval Potpourri https://wordpress.com/post/sparkypus.com/754 Minster Lovell at sunset @Colin Whitaker Minster Lovell Hall, Oxfordshire  lies in beautiful,  atmospheric ruins set amongst trees besides the River Windrush in the heart of the Cotswolds.     Pevensey describes these ruins to be ‘still the most picturesque  in the country’.   It was at least… Continue reading MINSTER LOVELL HALL, HOME TO FRANCIS LOVELL VISCOUNT LOVELL

Were the Wars of The Roses an Inevitability?

In my spare time I have been reading Henry IV by Chris Given-Wilson. It’s a massive book, full of information, probably the most complete work on Henry since Wylie’s four-volume effort in the 19th Century. Frankly, I’m finding it hard going. Not because it’s a bad book (it isn’t) or because Given-Wilson is a bad… Continue reading Were the Wars of The Roses an Inevitability?