Richard II went berserk in Salisbury….?

  Richard III’s predecessor, Richard II, shares with him the injustice of being maligned through history. In Richard II’s case all we hear that he was a hysterical madman who was rightly removed from his throne (and this world) by his cousin Henry, Duke of Lancaster, who became Henry IV. All sorts of scenarios are… Continue reading Richard II went berserk in Salisbury….?

Unwanted heirs? The Mortimers in the 1390s

It has been established now that Roger Mortimer, Earl of March, was declared heir to the throne by Parliament in 1386 – not 1385 as commonly believed. This Parliament was very much at odds with Richard II (it set up a one-year Commission to run most of his affairs, much to Richard’s displeasure.) So it… Continue reading Unwanted heirs? The Mortimers in the 1390s

WAS HENRY VII A RELUCTANT BRIDEGROOM?

REBLOGGED FROM A Medieval Potpourri sparkypus.com Henry VII and Elizabeth of York.  Their effigies in Westminster Abbey.  Artist Pietro Torrigiano. Photo westminster-abbey.org I was recently reading an excellent article in the Ricardian discussing Henry Tudor’s enthusiasm, or lack of it, for his marriage to Elizabeth of York by David Johnson entitled Ardent Suitor or Reluctant… Continue reading WAS HENRY VII A RELUCTANT BRIDEGROOM?

London’s Greatest Bridges (with Rob Bell)

The series began at London Bridge itself. From an engineering perspective, Bell explained that the wooden Claudian bridge was the first across the Thames , built on no fewer than twenty-nine artificial islands, making it very difficult to negotiate. It was replaced with a very similar stone unit by Henry II. The Haberdashers were very… Continue reading London’s Greatest Bridges (with Rob Bell)

Election of MPs. How local ‘democracy’ worked in the late Middle Ages.

In principle, each shire was supposed to elect two knights to represent it in Parliament – hence the expression ‘Knights of the shire.’ The leading men of the county (excluding magnates) would meet at the quarter-sessions or county court and choose suitable candidates, who would then be nominated by the Sheriff, whose job it was… Continue reading Election of MPs. How local ‘democracy’ worked in the late Middle Ages.

Are you still a thoroughly top-notch, summit-of-the-heap king without a coronation….?

Does anyone know what would happen if a newly succeeding medieval king were too unwell to undergo the rigours of a coronation? Would such a ceremony merely be postponed in the hope of his recovery? What would happen if he didn’t recover, but eventually died still without having had a coronation? Did the omission somehow… Continue reading Are you still a thoroughly top-notch, summit-of-the-heap king without a coronation….?

MPs who want to quit can apply to be Crown Steward and Bailiff of the Manor of Northstead….

“….MPs wishing to quit can apply to be ‘Crown Steward and Bailiff of the Chiltern Hundreds’ or ‘Crown Steward and Bailiff of the Manor of Northstead’. Neither job has existed for centuries but the ‘jobs’ still exist as a workaround to the law of 1624….” Well, I’d heard of the Chiltern Hundreds, but have to… Continue reading MPs who want to quit can apply to be Crown Steward and Bailiff of the Manor of Northstead….

THE TRIAL OF RICHARD III, PART 1

REBLOGGED FROM A MEDIEVAL POTPOURRI SPARKYPUS.COM The statue of Justice, Old Bailey, London. Way back in  1980 the late Jeremy Potter,  Chairman of the Richard III Society,  and producer Richard Drewitt discussed King Richard III at length and an idea was born.    That was to put Richard  on trial for a heinous murder he had… Continue reading THE TRIAL OF RICHARD III, PART 1

Richard III’s claims about Edward V’s bastardy had “traction”….

Here’s a link to an interesting article about the bastardy of Edward V, and the reception of Richard’s claims concerning it. Specifically with regard to the IPM of Hastings. You can download the full PDF. And as a ‘taster’:- “….Richard’s claim that Edward V was a bastard did have traction in the localities after the… Continue reading Richard III’s claims about Edward V’s bastardy had “traction”….

10 Facts About Simon de Montfort

Following his successful Henry III biography, here is Matthew Lewis’ contribution to History Hit about Simon de Montfort, the rebel who secretly married Henry’s sister before capturing him and Prince Edward, then being killed in battle at Evesham.