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The bones of 2,500 people under a Northamptonshire church….

“….The Holy Trinity Church in the small town of Rothwell [Northamptonshire] houses the corpses of 2,500 ancient men, women and children in a mysterious “hall of bones….”

I, um, hate the thought of being in a church with all those bones under it, but it is a mystery, all the same. Nothing would persuade me to go down to look, but if others go down and are able to work out the who, what, where, when and why, then I wish them well. These things do need to be explained, so it certainly doesn’t do for everyone to be as lily-livered as me.

Of course, those who do know everything, are the bones themselves…and they’re just not saying.

from Tokkaro.com

Now, on another tack entirely, go to the bottom of this article. This is where I start splitting hairs. Some dumbcluck at The Sun seems to think there were car parks in 1485! What else can I believe when he puts Richard’s burial site at Number 1 in a list of weird burial sites? Richard, he says, was found under a car park! Well, yes he was, but he wasn’t buried under one—the car park was built over his burial. Which is rather different.

Richard was interred at Greyfriars when it was still very much a place of worship, but it disappeared in the 16th century, thanks to Henry VIII. Richard’s resting place remained however, and was lost. Then the car park was built. The car park certainly wasn’t there in 1485, waiting for Richard to be placed beneath it! Nit-picking? Moi? Perish the thought.

THE PALACE OF COLLYWESTON–NEW EXCAVATIONS

Collyweston is a small village in Northamptonshire, approximately three miles from the town of Stamford. It was not always so unassuming, however. In the 15th century there was a large fortified manor house that dominated Collyweston, of which today no trace remains above ground. The manor, sometimes known as ‘The Palace’ was first purchased by Ralph, Lord Cromwell, who fought with Henry V in France and later became a Yorkist supporter (he was probably at the first Battle of St Alban’s); his will was proved at Collyweston  after his death at South Wingfield, Derbyshire in 1456.

Later, in 1486, the property went to the Crown and was given to Margaret Beaufort for life. She enlarged it further and added to the park and gardens. It was leased off later on, and dismantling of the house began in the 1630’s. She also added to the church in the late 15th century, and ‘My Lady’s Chapel’ might have been named after her. There are also a pair of ‘mutilated beast gargoyles’ from Lady Margaret’s time–I dare say they are NOT meant to be her and Henry, unlike the pair of heads on the church in Langport.

New excavations hope to find the ground plan of the house, and the area it covered is  apparently so large it stretches into the back gardens of various properties throughout the village.

 

COLLYWESTON EXCAVATIONS

Below: Collyweston Church. The Palace gardens were just behind it.

colly

My, my, some families really do not change their spots….!

Arms of Sir John Stanley I

While researching fourteenth-century Northamptonshire, I happened upon Sir John Stanley (1350-1414). “Stanley’s father was Master-Forester of the Forest of Wirral, notorious for his repressive activities. Both Stanley and his older brother, William (who succeeded their father as Master-Forester), were involved in criminal cases which charged them with a forced entry in 1369 and in the murder of Thomas Clotton in 1376.” Nice guys, right?

Stanley was found guilty, and outlawed. But because he was proving himself as a military fighter, he was pardoned—helped in this by Sir Thomas Trivet, who had a habit of getting scoundrels off the hook. He did the same for Sir John Cornwall, Senior, who was definitely a bad lot, but that’s another story.

Well, although Sir John Stanley was a younger son, in 1385 he made a very fortunate marriage. In the teeth of strong opposition from John of Gaunt, he wed Isabel Lathom, who was heir to swathes of land in Lancashire. Stanley was on the up!

He did well under Richard II, becoming the deputy in Ireland of Robert de Vere, Duke of Ireland. Richard II chose Stanley as justiciar of Ireland, and he was very much part of Richard’s successful first expedition to that land. Next, Stanley was prominent in soothing trouble in Cheshire, and took part in Richard’s second, ill-advised expedition to Ireland. This expedition came to an abrupt end when Henry of Bolingbroke, Gaunt’s heir as Duke of Lancaster, who had been exiled by Richard, invaded England to take the throne as Henry IV. Returning to England, “Stanley, who had long proved adept at political manoeuvring, turned his back on Richard and submitted to Henry IV.” Richard was imprisoned and soon died under mysterious circumstances.

So, the Stanleys were at it in 1399/1400 as well. Political jiggery-pokery, deserting their rightful King Richard, and smarming up to the wrongful King Henry. But this one did well, becoming King of Man, a privilege he and his descendants enjoyed until the 18th century.

Spots? Never change?

Stanley is granted the Isle of Man

http://www.cheshirenow.co.uk/stanley_family.html and http://www.isle-of-man.com/manxnotebook/people/lords/stanleys.htm. And see this list of offices held by Sir John Stanley.

 

 

 

 

Tales of a Ricardian Traveler: A Visit to King’s Cliffe Church and its Fotheringhay Artifacts

Although the entire eastern portion of St Mary and All Saints Church in Fotheringhay was demolished in 1573, it is still possible to see original woodwork and painted glass from the Yorkist Age.

RICARDIAN LOONS

Lady on Horseback Lady on Horseback, mid-15th c., British Museum

My husband and I had the good fortune to spend two weeks in England and Wales in October, 2017. I had been asked to moderate a conference about Richard III and 15th century warfare at the Leicester Guildhall, sponsored by the Richard III Foundation. During our stay in Leicester, we drove into Northamptonshire in order to explore a small parish church at King’s Cliffe that purported to have a number of objects from Richard III’s birthplace of Fotheringhay. What we discovered surpassed all our expectations.

Scene of Destruction: St Mary and All Saints Church

Like many tales of discovery, this one begins with a tale of loss. The year was 1566. Queen Elizabeth I was on progress through her realm, having already occupied the throne for 8 years. Her itinerary took her to Fotheringhay Castle, a short distance from the parish church…

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George Washington’s England, especially Sulgrave Manor….

sulgrave-manor

Sulgrave Manor

 

Sulgrave

Sulgrave Manor

I had never looked into the English origins of George Washington’s family, although I did know that his ancestors were associated with Washington Old Hall, Washington, Tyne & Wear. https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/washington-old-hall

Washington Old Hall

Washington Old Hall, Tyne & Wear

So I am surprised to discover that the family was also associated with other places, including Purleigh in Essex

 (http://www.kenmore.org/genealogy/washington/descendants.html) 

and Sulgrave Manor in the south of Northamptonshire, the latter being what I am mainly concerned with here., especially, I suppose, because Northamptonshire also happens to be the birth county of Richard III.

There was a castle at Sulgrave, on a site next to the present church, where some of the earthworks can still be seen. https://sulgrave.org/sulgrave-history-society/sulgrave-castle-project/

sulgrave-castle-mound-and-st-james-the-less-church-sulgrave

Earthworks of Sulgrave Castle beside the parish church

It is believed that the first buildings on the site were 10th-century Anglo-Saxon, maybe a stone and timber house and detached kitchen, with defensive earth ramparts. Then came the Normans, who replaced the original hall with one built entirely of stone, and increased the height of the ramparts. The castle site seems to have been abandoned at around 1140.

Toward the end of the reign of Henry VIII, Sulgrave and two other manors were granted to a wool merchant and former Mayor of Northampton, Lawrence Washington, who set about building a new manor house, using local limestone. The manor remained in the Washington family until 1659, when it was sold to the Hodges family (who reunited the three estates into which Sulgrave had become divided). Then Lawrence’s descendant, John Washington of Purleigh in Essex, emigrated to the Colony of Virginia. John was the great-grandfather of George Washington, the first elected President of the United States.

The house that Lawrence built, between 1540-60, stands at the north-east of the village, facing south-west. Because of foundation stones found a considerable way from the present building, it is believed the original house was much larger than the surviving property. The great hall has a stone floor, and a Tudor fireplace in which there is a salt cupboard bearing Lawrence Washington’s initials.

Great Hall Sulgrave

Great Hall, Sulgrave Manor

Over the south-west porch, which projects through two storeys, are the royal arms of England and the initials E.R., for Elizabeth I. There is also the Washington arms of two bars and three mullets or spur-rowels.

Sulgrave_Washington_Coat_of_Arms

Washington coat of arms, Sulgrave Manor porch

Today, Sulgrave Manor is a very attractive proposition for a visit, as indeed is the whole village. The manor house had lost one wing, which was restored in the 1920s. Here it is before restoration.

Sulgrave-Manor in 1910

Sulgrave Manor in 1910

Sulgrave village

Sulgrave Village

See more at:

https://www.sulgravemanor.org.uk/about-us/a-brief-history

http://www.discoverbritainmag.com/visit_sulgrave_manor_ancestral_home_of_first_us_president_george_washington_in_northamptonshire_1_3937451/

http://www.britainexpress.com/attractions.htm?attraction=2404

Another place that is associated with George Washington, although not in the usual way, is at the American Museum in Claverton, near Bath. His garden at Vermont has been recreated there, complete with white picket fences and some wonderful old-fashioned roses that have the most heavenly scent imaginable. It is some thirty years since I was last there, but I can still remember that exquisite fragrance on the warm summer air. Well worth going to for that alone. https://americanmuseum.org/about-the-museum/gardens-grounds/

Washington, of course, was born when Britain and its colonies were living under the Julian calendar. American independence happened long after 1752, when it switched to the Gregorian calendar, under which he died – see here.

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