Leprechauns were named by the Romans….?

There is a new dictionary of the medieval Irish language, contained in 23 volumes, see here. That’s a LOT of words! But one affects me more than all the others. It seems that “leprechaun” is not native Irish. It’s Roman. Oh, no. I wish they hadn’t discovered this, because as far as I’m concerned, leprechauns… Continue reading Leprechauns were named by the Romans….?

MYTH TO REALITY: VORTIGERN’S CAVE IN MARGATE

Margate is rightfully known for its famous, undatable Shell Grotto, which has been known as a folly, a Roman mithraeum and even a Phoenician temple.  However, FAR lesser known is another set of caverns, known as Vortigern’s cave. Probably dating between the 1600-s-1700’s, these caves have been closed on and off for several hundred years;… Continue reading MYTH TO REALITY: VORTIGERN’S CAVE IN MARGATE

Was Henry VII always so clever….?

Yet again, I tell you the old story of looking for one thing and happening on something else. This time an article that questions the ultimate effectiveness of Henry VII’s reign. Well, rather it raises questions that historians don’t seem to have asked before now. It is well worth reading, especially as there are links to other… Continue reading Was Henry VII always so clever….?

THE RED KING–WILLIAM RUFUS

Amidst the spreading Oaks of the New Forest stands a solitary stone, once ten foot high with a ball on top, now truncated and protected from vandals.  Known as the Rufus Stone, it is the memorial to a slain king, William II, one of England’s most mysterious and little known Norman Kings. On the stone,… Continue reading THE RED KING–WILLIAM RUFUS

Sir Ralph Assheton: Violent Despot or Figure of Folklore?

Sir Ralph Assheton was a nobleman listed as being close to Richard III during his short reign; some say he was even a personal friend. Over 30 years older than Richard, he had long served Edward IV, including as High Sheriff of Yorkshire, and was knighted after the Seige of Berwick. When Edward died and… Continue reading Sir Ralph Assheton: Violent Despot or Figure of Folklore?