1066 Remembered

Nearly 1,000 years have passed… In October 2016 I began a series of posts in memory of 1066, arguably the most important year in the history of England. Interestingly enough, while I enjoyed history, this era was not always my favored, as it once seemed so complicated and intimidating; my memories of studying it in school were… Continue reading 1066 Remembered

The Crown Jewels of East Anglia?

This excellent EADT article suggests that a horde found near Tamworth about ten years ago included some crown jewels worn by Anna* or Onna, the (Wuffing) King of East Anglia and nephew of Raedwald. He is likely to have died in a 653/4 battle near Blythburgh, along with his Bishop, Thomas, fighting against Penda’s pagan… Continue reading The Crown Jewels of East Anglia?

ST OSWALD’S IN GLOUCESTER–A TOWER FOUND

The scanty arches of St Oswald’s Priory lie tucked in a Gloucester suburb  a few minutes walk  from  the cathedral. Once a place of great importance, it was the burial spot of Queen Aethelflaed, daughter of Alfred the Great. She was a warrior-queen who fought the Vikings. Henry of Huntingdon wrote this about her– Heroic… Continue reading ST OSWALD’S IN GLOUCESTER–A TOWER FOUND

Warwick Castle – England’s Finest Medieval Castle

Warwick Castle Portcullis Francis Frith Photo of the portcullis 1901 The mound as viewed from the portcullis Old bridge Warwick Castle The moat Warwick Castle. Old staircase in Warwick Castle 14th century Guys Tower For more photos and an interesting article  from ‘Britain and Britishness’ about Warwick Castle please  see this link . Much of… Continue reading Warwick Castle – England’s Finest Medieval Castle

Helen Castor’s “Made in the middle”

  This is part five, of a short series by the Warwickshire-born historian, which concentrates on modern issues such as Richard’s reburial: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b07c56j6#play. However, the whole series is available and covers the Anglo-Saxon period, when there were several Cathedrals in the Midland kingdom of Mercia.