Edmund, Earl of Rutland, a life cut short.

UPDATED POST AT sparkypus.com A Medieval Potpourri https://sparkypus.com/2020/05/14/edmund-earl-of-rutland-a-life-cut-short/ Fotheringhay Church and  Yorkist Mausoleum 1804.   Watercolour by unknown artist.   A link here to an excellent article on Edmund, Earl of Rutland.  The History Geeks can be found on Facebook: The article also give a plausible reason as to why Edmund’s christening ceremony at Rouen… Continue reading Edmund, Earl of Rutland, a life cut short.

Richard III, Henry VII and the City of York….

    This is not my work, but has been lifted entirely from British History Online. My contribution is the illustrations. It is a sensible assessment of the relationship of both Richard and Henry Tudor with the great city of York. :-  York, Richard of Gloucester, and Henry VII  There was much that was new in… Continue reading Richard III, Henry VII and the City of York….

BLOOD OF ROSES (A Novella of Edward IV’s Victory at Towton)

Richard, Duke of York and his second son Edmund were killed at the battle of Wakefield at the bitter end of  1460. Within weeks, the Duke’s eldest son Edward was on the road with a mighty army, seeking revenge–and a crown. The novella BLOOD OF  ROSES by J.P. Reedman covers the period  from the Duke’s… Continue reading BLOOD OF ROSES (A Novella of Edward IV’s Victory at Towton)

And now for the height and appearance of Edmund, Earl of Rutland….

Well, OK, I admit it, the picture right above is NOT Edmund. It’s just an image of a young knight, which is what Edmund was at the time of his death. The trouble is, what did Edmund of Rutland actually look like? Another giant like his elder brother Edward IV? Or…smaller and more delicate, like his… Continue reading And now for the height and appearance of Edmund, Earl of Rutland….

Towton, 29th March 1461: The Bloodiest Battle in English History?

Originally posted on Giaconda's Blog:
Towton is regarded by many historians as the worst battle to ever be fought on English soil in terms of the number of combatants, casualty figures, conditions on the day and treatment of those captured during the rout. It is always extremely difficult to gauge the reality of the…

‘The Hollow Crown’: A Poisoned Chalice or the Ultimate Prize?

Originally posted on Giaconda's Blog:
? Benedict Cumberbatch as Shakespeare’s Richard III ? I am currently watching the second instalment of Shakespeare’s history plays, concerning ‘The Wars of the Roses’ as interpreted by the BBC’s condensed and somewhat, contorted adaptation. The first part of ‘The Hollow Crown’ covered Shakespeare’s history plays: Richard II, Henry…

The True History of King Richard III (Part 3)

The True History of King Richard III – Part 3 Interlude It is now time for a little housekeeping and explanation. The political situation between 1455 and 1459 is too boring and complicated to go into here. Suffice it to say that sometimes the Duke of York was in power, and sometimes the Duke of… Continue reading The True History of King Richard III (Part 3)

The True History of King Richard III (Part 2)

The Battle of St. Albans, 1455. Having been two years in the womb, Richard was naturally a forward child, and in no time at all he was not only walking but wearing a little suit of armour. The Duke of York had this made for him by the village blacksmith,  an advanced craftsman who doubled… Continue reading The True History of King Richard III (Part 2)

DUKE RICHARD THE 3RD DUKE OF YORK (3): heir to the throne

The she-wolf of France, but worse than wolves of France Whose tongue more poisons than an adders tooth How ill beseeming it is in thy sex To triumph like an amazon trull” (Henry VI Part 3) St Albans and its significance The first battle of St Albans represents a landmark in the dispute between York… Continue reading DUKE RICHARD THE 3RD DUKE OF YORK (3): heir to the throne