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Archive for the tag “Leicestershire”

Richard III and a hansom cab….?

Atkins Building

The following is taken from the site to which there is a link below. I am posting it because among the exhibits will be items concerning Richard III and Bosworth:-

The iconic Hansom Cab will return to its ‘hometown’ as part of the National Heritage Open Days celebration.

The two-passenger horse-drawn carriage will be back in action on Saturday September 9 with town dignitaries being taken for a spin and the public invited to admire its restored splendour.

Developed and tested by Joseph Hansom in Hinckley and patented in 1834, the Hansom cab went on to become one of the most popular forms of transport during the 1800s.

hansom cab

This example, which once graced the entrance to the Hinckley Island Hotel, has been fully restored and remains in the custody of the restorer until a suitable site to house it can be found in the town.

Long-term plans are likely to see it put on show at Hinckley and District Museum but fundraising to create an extension to accommodate it needs to be completed first.

The cab is not the only historical attraction to command attention on the day. Several listed buildings not usually operating a full-time ‘open door’ policy will be available for the public to tour.

These include the Atkins Building, Hinckley and District Museum, Hinckley Great Meeting Unitarian Chapel, St Peter’s Church in Thornton as well as the Hinckley Masonic Hall.

A special history display will be mounted in Hinckley Market Place, with information from the Hinckley and Bosworth Borough Council, local history group Hinckley District Past and Present and also historian Greg Drozdz. Greg will also be leading a walk dedicated to Hinckley’s literary heritage.

The celebration also coincides with the 50th anniversary of conservation areas and a special display will be held within the Market Place.

Borough Councillor Stan Rooney, said: “Having a Hansom cab return to the streets of Hinckley will be a wonderful sight and showcase the heritage that this town has to offer.

“The Hansom cab is an asset to the town and long may we continue to celebrate the fact it was developed here. I am very excited to see the cab in action.”

Hinckley Masonic Hall on St Mary’s Road, will be open on Saturday September 9 from 10am to 3pm to allow visitors access to the Masonic Lodge rooms and lean about the 300th anniversary of Freemasonry and the history of the Hinckley lodges.

Greg Drozdz’s literary themed walk takes place at 2.30pm on Saturday September 9.

Grade I-listed medieval church, St Peter’s at Thornton will be open from 10am to 6pm on Saturday September 9 and from 1pm to 5pm on Sunday September 10.

The museum, Atkins Building and Unitarian Chapel form the focus of a guided walk which starts at 10.30am on Saturday September 9.

Beginning at the museum on Lower Bond Street the tour moves across the road to what was once one of the largest hosiery factories in the world then turns up Baines Lane to visit the Great Meeting Chapel with its links to the Atkins family revealed.

Refreshments will be available at all three venues. The Atkins Building offers full wheelchair access and there is partial wheelchair access available at the other two sites. To book a place email info@atkinsbuilding.co.uk or call Hinckley 247070.

■ For further heritage insight Hinckley and District Museum will be free to visitors on Friday and Saturday September 8 and 9 from 10am to 4pm and Sunday September 10 from 2pm to 5pm.

The thatched former frame-work knitters cottages date from the 1680s and feature exhibits on early stoking making, Romans, local brewing, both the First and the Second World War and of course Richard III and the Battle of Bosworth.

The 1722 Great Meeting Unitarian Chapel will be open for visitors on Saturday September 9 from 10am to 4pm.

“The iconic Hansom Cab will return to its ‘hometown’ as part of the National Heritage Open Days celebration.

“The two-passenger horse-drawn carriage will be back in action on Saturday September 9 with town dignitaries being taken for a spin and the public invited to admire its restored splendour.”

http://www.hinckleytimes.net/news/local-news/heritage-delights-hansom-cab-returns-13549184

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Richard the FUTILE warrior? I think not….!

Stapleton, Leics

Well, I don’t know that all the facts are correct in this article. For instance, Richard’s effort (i.e. his going into battle at all against HT) was ‘futile’??? Sorry, but Richard went into that battle quite rightly certain he would triumph.

And he went into battle in a raging temper because he knew the Stanleys were doing the dirty on him? Hmm. He may have been justifiably suspicious of them, but he didn’t find out how faithless and slippery they really were until well after the battle had commenced. Only then did he realize victory wasn’t certain after all, and that’s when his fury erupted! He fought like a demon and got within a hair’s breadth of Henry Tudor, who never entered the fray, but lurked timidly behind his bodyguards. That was Tudor’s policy on a battlefield—never endanger one’s precious self by mixing it with all those nasty knights.

And, sadly, Tudor was the one who died in his bed. But Richard is the one who died in glory, admired by all, even his enemies, for the courage, ferocity and skill of his fighting. No one could ever look at Tudor and say, “Wow! Now there’s a great knight!” Everyone thought it of King Richard III.

But the article is interesting for all that.

http://www.hinckleytimes.net/news/local-news/past-times-history-stapleton-11728828

 

Mythmaking: BONES IN THE RIVER

Night. The late Middle Ages. An angry mob rips open the sealed tomb of a man and carries his fleshless skeleton through the town streets, jeering. Reaching a field of execution, the bones are hurled on a pyre and burnt, then crushed to small fragments. This indignity not being enough, the desecrated remains are then gathered up and hurled unceremoniously into a Leicestershire river while the throng gazes on, casting  abuse at the meagre remnants of the hated dead man as the waves swallow them…

A version of  River Soar myth about Richard III, now disproved by the finding of his lost grave?

No, but the above story is almost certainly the origin of this once pervasive myth.

It was John Wycliffe, who produced the first Bible in English, whose bones met this fate. A Yorkshire man, who was educated at Merton College in Oxford, he was a noted theologian and philosopher, who became the rector of Lutterworth in Leicestershire. He wrote books that were considered heretical and was accused of  inspiring the Peasant’s Revolt. His followers, the Lollards, were often persecuted…and executed…long after his death. He himself remained a threatening figure to the church even years after he died of a stroke. As he had escaped the normal heretics’ punishment of death by burning, when he lived, it was decided to vent the punishment on his remains. So his skeleton was disinterred, burned and hurled into the River Swift.

Somewhere along the line, this true tale ‘grew in the telling’ and changed, as such stories often do; repeated over and over with added embellishments and errors  they  lose their original meaning and only retain fragments of the truth…in this case, that the remains of a persecuted man had been dug up from the grave by a mob and thrown into a Leicestershire river. To the average person, centuries after the event, who was better known and more interesting to tell such tales about,  a slain King or a heretical theologian?

Once Stuart era cartographer John Speed had written down the legend in regards to Richard, it swiftly took hold and was accepted henceforth accepted as truth by many…including numerous historians, although without one scrap of hard evidence (these historians shall remain nameless!)

The mythologisers had put the wrong man in the wrong river.

You know the rest.

wycliff

 

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