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Archive for the tag “Leicester”

A Richard III Easter Egg. . .?

Richsard Easter Egg - 1On reading this article, my thoughts followed their usual wayward course, and I found myself imagining a solid Easter egg with an image of Richard. EAT IT? Never! It would be displayed in splendid perpetuity.

 

 

 

 

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Now it’s 3-0

A few months ago, we wrote to say that there were two JD Wetherspoons named after Richard III – the Lord High Constable in Gloucester and the Last Plantagenet in Leicester – but none after Henry VII. Now, having been reminded that Richard created the Court of Requests, there is one by that name in Oldbury, Sandwell.

They really do seem to know their history …

Oops, the NY Times claimed Richard wasn’t found in Leicester, but in London….!

ny times - genetics review

Even the New York Times gets it wrong! Apparently an earlier version of a book review had Richard being found in London, not Leicester. Someone advised them, and the error was corrected.

Anyway, to read the whole review of A BRIEF HISTORY OF EVERYONE WHO EVER LIVED: The Human Story Retold Through Our Genes by Adam Rutherford, go here.

An Easter exhibition

From Saturday to Easter Monday, the Richard III Visitor Centrekinglego1JPG will have a special interactive exhibition for children, including the chance to build the King from Lego bricks or to illustrate him in other ways.

 

Thirteen very unusual facts about Leicester, and Philippa Langley’s discovery of Richard’s resting place is one of them….!

Leicester

Well, these days we are all accustomed to reading about Leicester because England’s finest king is now buried there. Richard does indeed figure in this rather peculiar list of thirteen fascinating facts about the city and its county, and (for once) Philippa Langley gets full credit. Excellent. What happened to her might read like a fairy tale, but it’s true! Truth is indeed stranger than fiction.

All thirteen facts in the list are interesting/astonishing. Take a peek here.

The source of all this is the award-winning podcasters No Such Thing as a Fish. They brought their tour to the De Montfort Hall on Tuesday, November 28th. See also here.

Playwrights and persistent historical myths

Today in 1564, Christopher Marlowe (right) was baptised in Canterbury.

One of the plays for which he is most famous is

 

 

 

Edward II (left), traditionally dated a year before his own 1593 death. In it, he fuels the myth of Edward meeting his end by a red-hot poker. This is cited by Starkey in his (Channel Four series) Monarchy, who called Edward’s rear his “fundament”, showing again why he should not roam from his Tudor” area of expertise.

 

 

Marlowe’s legacy of influence in this is obviously less than Shakespeare’s with regard to Richard III, but the parallels are

obvious. In quoting earlier “historians”, Shakespeare transferred the kyphosis of another contemporary figure to Richard, which some naive people still believe, whilst Richard’s disinterment demonstrated him to suffer from scoliosis instead. Indeed, the Starkey acolyte Dan Jones seems untroubled by the facts in either case.

 

 

Another royal murder mystery….!

King_James_I_of_Scotland_jpg-e1487678242974-536x372

King James I of Scotland

Well, it has to be said that Leicester has benefited immensely from the discovery and burial of Richard III, and his supposed “murder” of the boys in the Tower. Of which he was NOT guilty.

Anyway, maybe Perth can benefit too, because it has its own royal mystery. James I of Scotland died a very bloody, grubby death, his body being found with 28 knife wounds in a stinking tunnel. In 1437, he too was buried in a house of God, which was subsequently destroyed. Is he, like Richard, still waiting to be discovered?

If he’s found and reburied, I hope Perth will reap some reward. Maybe too, the truth of how he died, and who killed him, will be discovered as well.

Furthermore …

As we wrote a few weeks ago, there are two JD Wetherspoons named specifically for Richard III, in Gloucester and Leicester. Is there one, in Wales perhaps, named after Henry VII?

This list confirms that this is not the case. At best, “Tudor”-ists could only claim that “The Lord Caradoc” (left) in Port Talbot might refer to Sir Matthew Craddock but actually it is someone from the twelfth century.

Evidently, this particular company is very historically aware and the town’s name is connected to Richard’s sister-in-law.

The hunt for Richard’s spirit is on again….

 

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They’re ba-ack….! Well, the ghost-hunters of Haunted Heritage are. When they went to Donington le Heath Manor House on a previous occasion they claim to have heard a supernatural voice say Richard’s name, and now they hope to get in try again. You are able to hear the voice as it was recorded. Note, they do not claim that the voice is that of Richard III, but the manor house is one of the numerous places Richard is said to have slept before Bosworth.

They are leading a ghost hunt at the manor on Saturday, 17th June. If I learn what happened, I will post about it.

 

Lannister and York: Kasabian’s III Ray (The King)

A very unusual video came down my timeline the other day; at first I thought it was a joke (ok, ok, I’m older than God and am no longer in touch with the current music scene!) but it seems I was very wrong.  Successful Leicester band Kasabian have released a music trailer for their new song III Ray–The King (which contains the lyrics ‘King for a Day) which uses the finding of Richard’s remains as a basis. It is funny but silly, and certainly won’t be to everyone’s taste, but even if it’s taking the mickey, it seems to be poking fun in  a non-vicious way.

In the video, a female history freak holds seances and lights candles in a carpark and then, magically,  Richard appears! Stunned and dazed, the King is dragged through the streets of Leicester like a celebrity lumbered by his ‘biggest fan’. He ends up in a pub, where he immediately notices the low necklines on the female population, and finds out that beer is much stronger in the 21st c than in the 15th! At the end though, magic doesn’t last and he can only be ‘king for a day.’

Richard is played by Michael Socha , star of THIS IS ENGLAND, and at least is in the right age group and wearing clothes that are actually based on those in Richard’s portraits (better than what we’ve recently  seen on certain documentaries fronted by ‘historians’, ahem.)

Perhaps the most interesting part of the Kasabian video is that ‘the fan’ is played by Lena Headey, star of the wildly successful series  GAMES OF THRONES, in which she plays the scheming and incestuous Cersei Lannister. GOT  is, in part, based on Wars of the Roses, and many characters are amalgamations of historical figures mixed with the author’s own ideas. Some believe Cersei is  partly based on Elizabeth Woodville and partly on Margaret of Anjou. The character also did  the infamous ‘Walk of Shame’ which was clearly based on Jane Shore’s penance…only it was much, much worse.

VIDEO

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-4836734/Game-Thrones-star-Lena-Headey-Kasabian-video.html

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jf3CPnDMVz0

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