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Archive for the tag “Leicester”

More about the King Richard III pub….

king%20richard%20iii%20pub

Below are two links to some more information about the once doomed King Richard III public house in Leicester. The above illustration is a mock-up of its eventual new frontage.

Let’s hope that they intend to reflect the real Richard, not the Tudor/Shakespeare invention. Leicester needs to be truly proud of their good king, not do him the grave injustice of perpetuating his enemies’ propaganda.

http://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/exclusive-find-out-what-will-be-on-the-menu-at-the-new-look-king-richard-iii/story-30085695-detail/story.html and http://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/historic-city-pub-to-be-revived/story-30085017-detail/story.html

BBC Radio Leicester interviews John Ashdown-Hill …

bbcradioleicester… about his book “The Private Life of Edward IV”.

Here, at 45:12, he discusses Edward’s legal marriage, his bigamous marriage and his (other) mistresses.

Here, at about 49:00 , he disscusses Edward’s (hitherto little known) relationship with Henry, Duke of Somerset and his visits to Leicester.

Descriptions of two important Ricardian books….

Here’s how Kent County Council describes the two important Ricardian books.

https://erl.overdrive.com/media/1389033

Richard III:A Small Guide to the Great Debate by Annette Carson

“Ever since the discovery of his lost grave in Leicester, the eyes of the world have been drawn to the twists and turns surrounding England’s King Richard III… Annette Carson, acclaimed author and expert on Richard’s reign (and one of the team who found him), has published A Small Guide to the Great Debate, a brief summary of the main arguments concerning his actions and reputation. Carson has researched and written extensively on Richard III. Her book Richard III: The Maligned King (The History Press, 2008) was revised in 2013 and sold out within 3 months. The print edition of A Small Guide was published on 1 July this year and is already stocked, in hundreds, by visitors’ centres at Leicester, Bosworth Battlefield and elsewhere. Written as a succinct, straightforward summary of the facts, this short handbook outlines how King Richard came to be portrayed as a monster-villain by the Tudors, and how a backlash in later centuries created the ‘Great Debate’ over his reputation, which still rages today. It also analyses the mystery of the ‘Princes in the Tower’, examining what people actually said and did at the time of their disappearance, and who profited from their removal. The book sets out all the main theories and arguments, together with their strengths and weaknesses, in a non-scholarly style, without imposing judgements and conclusions. An invaluable reference resource, it invites readers to weigh up the evidence and make up their own minds. Recommended for anyone interested in Richard III, for libraries and also as a reference for the media, A Small Guide sticks to the verifiable facts while offering insights you won’t find in conventional history books.”
https://kent.overdrive.com/media/1241128

The Last Days of Richard III and the fate of his DNA by John Ashdown-Hill

“The Last Days of Richard III contains a new and uniquely detailed exploration of Richard’s last 150 days. By deliberately avoiding the hindsight knowledge that he will lose the Battle of Bosworth Field, we discover a new Richard: no passive victim, awaiting defeat and death, but a king actively pursuing his own agenda. It also re-examines the aftermath of Bosworth: the treatment of Richard’s body; his burial; and the construction of his tomb. And there is a fascinating story of why, and how, Richard III’s family tree was traced until a relative was found, alive and well, in Canada. Now, with the discovery of Richard’s skeleton at the Greyfriars Priory in Leicester, England, John Ashdown-Hill explains how his book inspired the dig and completes Richard III’s fascinating story, giving details of how Richard died, and how the DNA link to aliving relative of the king allowed the royal body to be identified.”

Somewhere to celebrate the discovery and history of DNA….?

richards-dna

This sounds a good idea to me. DNA is so very important, that the history of its discovery and development is important too.

http://blooloop.com/link/leicester-dna-centre/

More reburials based around Richard’s service at Leicester….

anglo-saxon-reburials

Richard III’s reburial service is to be adapted for more reburials, this time of Anglo-Saxon Christians-men, women and children-found at Kirkleatham, have been laid to rest at St Cuthbert’s, Redcar.

http://www.gazettelive.co.uk/news/teesside-news/anglo-saxon-christians-reburied-redcar-12218102

 

Richard’s latest court trial….

richards-latest-trial

Richard has been put on trial again, and found not guilty. I tell you the verdict of the latest trial in case you lose the will to live before finally emerging from the intensely intrusive advertisements that always ruin the Leicester Mercury website. The article itself IS there, and an account of the trial.  Just stick at it.

Oh, and Richard is a little middle-aged, but we have to get past that sort of thing.

http://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/8203-richard-iii-trial-in-leicester-set-to-answer-600-year-old-medieval-mystery-8211-live-updates/story-29863423-detail/story.html

In other words, he was acquitted again despite:
Only being five or six when the trial began.
Being dead before it finished. More being allowed to testify without a head – and not mentioning the “energetic priest” moving the bodies.
Only the “balance of probabilities” being required to decide the case.

Richard inspires best-selling author to write forensic crime thrillers….

patricia-cornwell

We have all heard of Patricia Cornwell, author of numerous titles, including the Scarpetta series. Well, it seems that the discovery of Richard’s remains have inspired her to change direction from straight crime into forensic crime.  Richard’s appeal reaches out in all manner of different ways!

http://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/how-did-leicester-inspire-best-selling-author-patricia-cornwell/story-29840177-detail/story.html

Bring it on, Philippa….!

philippa-langley

Quote from the link below:-

“She [Philippa Langley] revealed at the end of the talk that she has now gathered a team to try and discover the truth behind the many stories and versions of what happened to the princes in the tower, and all she would say was that some of their findings so far have been gobsmacking. Let’s hope the festival invites her back in the future with the results. ”

Gobsmacking????? How tantalising! Bring it on, Philippa, we’re all waiting.

http://www.gallowaygazette.co.uk/what-s-on/what-s-on/philippa-s-sixth-sense-found-the-king-in-the-car-park-1-4243012

Who else is under that car park….?

henry-i

What can I say? Richard was buried in Leicester, which is apparently part of Reading. Or is it the other way around? Whatever, Henry I was there too! Were they close enough to commiserate? Perhaps archaeologists should dig a little deeper where they found Richard and Henry . . . because it’s likely King Arthur is also down there somewhere! At least they didn’t ask why Windsor Castle was built so close to Heathrow.

http://www.smobserved.com/story/2016/09/21/news/kings-under-parking-lots-odd-habits-of-the-british/1999.html

(If you would like to know more about Henry I,  http://www.berkshirehistory.com/bios/henry1.html is quite informative)

Has Henry I been located?

A heat map  produced by GPR appears to show evidence of graves close to Reading Abbey’s high altar, corresponding almost exactly to Richard III’s location in the Leicester Greyfriars, as this post shows. The site, which is presently and inevitably a car park, was once occupied by the gaol Oscar Wilde made famous, see also here .
burial1136

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