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Richard III and Robert Cecil (Part II)

In a previous post, we explored the theory that Shakespeare’s Richard III was actually based on the Elizabethan politician, Robert Cecil.

Picture of Robert Cecil

Here is another discussion of the subject, Richard III and Robert Cecil, with references to the hypothesis that Shakespeare was actually the 17th Earl of Oxford, a descendant of the previous Earls of Oxford who were such thorns in the side of the Yorkist kings and one of whom was a major factor in Richard’s defeat at Bosworth. If this is true, it is no wonder that ‘Shakespeare’ was happy to blacken Richard’s name.

There are a few misconceptions in the linked article, notably the assertion that Richard executed the 12th Earl and his oldest son; since Richard was only nine years of age on the date Oxford was executed (26th February 1462) this is obviously erroneous and it was, in fact, John Tiptoft who would have presided over Oxford’s execution, being Constable of England at that time (a position he occupied until 1469).

Such distortions of age and timing also occur in Shakespeare, of course, placing Richard at the first battle of St Alban’s, when he would only have been two and a half years old! In fact, he took part in neither of the St Alban’ s battles.

Also, the article states that the most recent attempt to refute the Shakespearean portrayal of Richard’s character was Josephine Tey’s ‘Daughter of Time’. Although this is probably the most famous such work there have, in fact, been countless more recent ones attempting the same thing, such as ‘The Sunne in Splendour’ by Sharon K Penman, ‘We Speak No Treason’ by Rosemary Hawley Jarman, ‘I, Richard Plantagenet’ by J P Reedman and my own ‘Richard Liveth Yet’.

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BLOOD OF ROSES (A Novella of Edward IV’s Victory at Towton)

Richard, Duke of York and his second son Edmund were killed at the battle of Wakefield at the bitter end of  1460. Within weeks, the Duke’s eldest son Edward was on the road with a mighty army, seeking revenge–and a crown.

The novella BLOOD OF  ROSES by J.P. Reedman covers the period  from the Duke’s death to Edward’s Coronation on June 28 1461. Edward’s early battles are curiously sidelined  in most fiction, despite their importance, while his amorous pursuits often seem to take the fore! This ‘slice of life’ fiction book tries to redress that balance slightly.

In February 1461 Edward fought the first of his battles for the throne at Mortimer’s Cross, where the parhelion, the Three Suns, appeared  in the sky. Edward sensed the fear and doubt growing in his men at the sight of this phenomena, and, aged only 18, showed great cleverness in convincing them it was a GOOD omen–the sign of the Holy Trinity. The battle went decively for the Yorkists, with Jasper Tudor’s father Owen being executed in Hereford’s town square. Legend says a deranged lady took his head and sat on the market cross crooning to it as she brushed its hair…

With Edward were the Croft family of Croft Castle, which is on the Welsh borders. This is the family made famous by the letter sent from Ludlow to the Duke of York by his young sons, Edward and Edmund, asking for bonnets and other items. At first reading, one section of the letter seems to  be against bullying behaviour by the Croft sons, who were also at Ludlow, but is in fact, on second reading,  against the ‘odious and demeaning’ treatment of them, a fact recently noted by Dr John Ashdown-Hill. Richard Croft went on to serve Edward IV (so clearly no  friction there!), then Richard III and Henry Tudor.

Mortimer’s Cross was a great victory but there was then a distinct setback when the Earl of Warwick was defeated by the Lancastrians at St Albans, and King Henry, until then a Yorkist prisoner, taken  to rejoin his wife, Margaret of Anjou. Nonetheless, Edward entered London and was proclaimed king, although he sworehe would not wear the crown until he had defeated his enemies utterly. Gathering his army, he began a hard march north.

At Ferrybridge, the Lancastrians attacked the Yorkists over the damaged bridge crossing the Aire, in a night-raid led by Lord Clifford, the presumed murderer of Edmund of Rutland, who had appeared suddenly with his ‘chosen’ men, the Flower of Craven. At first the Yorkists were thrown into disarray, with Lord Fitzwalter being hewn down the moment he stepped from his tent to see what the commotion outside was about. Luckily, William Neville, Lord Fauconberg, the most experienced commander of the Yorkist host, took the lead and crossed near Castleford to attack the Lancastrian flank. Fauconberg was a small-framed man, often described as ‘little Fauconberg’ who had a long military career, having served in France, including at the famous Siege of Orleans. He was an uncle of Edward, being the third son of Ralph Neville, Earl of Westmorland and his wife Joan Beaufort (Edward’s maternal grandparents.) Fauconberg  made short work of Clifford’s Flower of Craven, and Clifford himself was killed, mostly like by an arrow when removing his gorget.

Then the Yorkist army pushed on to Towton, fought on Palm Sunday and in a fierce snowstorm. Some have questioned the possibility of a  snowstorm that late in the year, but looking at our recent March weather, it is not impossible at all that there was indeed heavy snow! The bad weather was advantageous to the Yorkists, with the worst of the weather being at their backs and driving into the faces of their enemies. The Lancastrian archers were at a distinct disadvantage with the strong wind blowing their arrows astray.

The battle was hard fought, nevertheless, as the Lancastrian forces far outnumbered those of the Yorkists. However, when the Duke of Norfolk’s contingent arrived, led by John Howard, the battle finally turned in Edward’s favour. A rout ensued and the battlefield became a killing field. The waters of nearby Cock Beck ran red with blood and filled with bodies. The area was afterwards called Bloody Meadow.

It was the bloodiest battle ever fought on English’s soil, with figures as high as 28,000 stated for the casualties. Even given the exaggeration of the chroniclers of the day, it was undoubtedly a huge amount of slain. In recent years some of the remains of the fallen have been recovered, mostly around Towton Hall, where archaeologists recently found the remains of Richard III’s chapel to the fallen soldiers subsumed into the inner fabric of the hall. The skeletons recovered showed the terrifying brutality of medieval warfare–shattered skulls, slashing injuries, facial mutilation, slicing marks that may have been the removal of ears…

Chivalry died a death upon this field of blood. But England had a new king–Edward of York, the Sunne in Splendour.

BLOOD OF ROSES IS AVAILABLE IN KINDLE AND PRINT FROM AMAZON

BLOOD OF ROSES

 

A MAN WHO WOULD BE KING: THE DUKE OF BUCKINGHAM AND RICHARD III

The Duke of Buckingham is rather a ‘dark horse’ figure in the history of Richard III. No one knows for sure why he  aided Richard to take the throne only to turn upon him in rebellion a few months later. Simplistic ideas such as ‘he repented of his ways after the princes were murdered’ don’t stand scrutiny, especially when he was the first one to suggest that Edward V be housed in the Tower, and also  when the number of documents naming him as their potential killer (if indeed they were killed at all) is taken into account. Whatever happened to Edward IV’s sons, no doubt Buckingham knew…

A MAN WHO WOULD BE KING by J.P. Reedman  is a new novel written from Buckingham’s first person perspective. He is certainly no ‘hero’ and the character flaws that appear even in cotemporary accounts are visible, but the addition of wry humour makes the character palatable to the reader, even amusing in his pomposity. His life is covered from his birth at Abergavenny Castle in Wales to his death on the scaffold in Salisbury. Essentially it shows what must have been the life of many a young noble in this period–a childhood full of deaths and seperations and disappointment–which was later reflected in his emerging character.

The ancestry and background of the Staffords was heavily researched for the novel too, and it becomes very clear how ‘Lancastrian’ they were. Not only did Buckingham’s grandfather die attempting to protect Henry VI in his tent as the Battle of Northampton, but his mother was Margaret Beaufort, daughter of Edmund Duke of Somerset who was killed at St Albans. The other Margaret Beaufort, Henry Tudor’s mother, was Buckingham’s aunt by marriage. Several other uncles on the Beaufort side lost their lives at Tewkesbury, fighting for Lancaster.

Henry, called Harry in the novel, is intensely proud of his heritage, harkening back tiomes and time against to his ancestry from Thomas of Woodstock, youngest son of Edward III–who seems, from the descriptions to be similar in temperament to Buckingham, being named in one popular history as the ‘Bully of Woodstock.’  Buckingham also had a copy of the document legitimising the Beauforts–only it was the early document without the addenda barring them from the throne. Between owning that and applying to wear the Arms of Thomas of Woodstock unquartered, it seemed Harry Stafford was very aware of his royal lineage. (This awareness and the classic ‘Stafford personality’ brought his son Edward to doom in the reign of Henry VIII.)

In the novel, Harry meets Richard  intermittently over the years (I have come to believe they knew each other more than what is sometimes suggested by both fiction and some historians, although they do not appear to have been close friends) and attempts from the start to use him to gain favour with Edward, who never gave Buckingham any high positions save one–High Steward at George of Clarence’s trial. He begins a subtle manipulation, which changes entirely in its focus when Edward dies suddenly in 1483.

 

 

 

THE WHITE ROSE: A POEM FOR RICHARD

Several years ago I was out at Bosworth to attend an author signing with one of my favourite Ricardian authors, Sharon Penman, who wrote the mighty epic The Sunne in Splendour. We were staying in the Royal Arms at Sutton Cheney, which has a public room filled with armour, memorabilia, paintings of the battle and of Richard and Tudor (I put the latter at my back!)

Our room was in an annexe that looked out over the fields. The light was grey, heavy; the soil of the field, newly ploughed, glistening after rain, looked red. Redemore. The Red Plain. In the distance the hedges wore little crowns of mist, and a single dark-winged crow sat on the fence, its shrill cry breaking a strange stillness. A haunting place.

We went to bed. In the night we heard rain drumming on the roof. We turned over,slept.  In the early hours of the morning,  I was woken by a ruckus overhead. There was crashes and bangs as if someone, or more like multiple someones, were streaming, charging over the roof of the building. I began to fancy them as hoofbeats and laughed at myself and my infamous imagination.  It must surely be the hotel staff doing something in a room above us…but why the heck were they doing it pre-dawn when they had guests?

The sounds clattered away into nothingess. I went back to sleep. Later, when  we got up and went to pack our things in the car, I looked back towards the building.

There was no upstairs room above ours.

This poem came out of that night….

THE WHITE ROSE

I walked upon Bosworth field,
the soil red beneath my feet
as rain pelted from a stormy sky
in a grey and stony sheet

Sutton Cheney’s stolid tower
was an upturned bucket in the mist
and the whole rolling landscape
a haunted vista twilight kissed.

Why do I feel such strangling sorrow
in that lonely, empty space
where amongst the bristling hedges
the small birds dart and race

soaring like souls into a sky
unchanged by the passing years,
still on this sullen summer’s day
pouring out its bitter tears.

I found a crooked, winding path
that crossed a farmer’s land…
so plain and oh so ordinary
you might dismiss it out of hand

But I knew that here was the place
where a banner once soared on high,
and a White Boar fighting rose and fell,
a betrayed man consigned to die

So history was written
and legends false and foul were born,
birthed out of blood and treachery
on a red-tinged summer’s morn

The victor writes the pages,
speechless dead cannot defend
but I swore I would speak for him
both now and till the end.

And when I returned later
to my little rented room
at midnight I heard thunder
like a banging drum of doom

or was it something greater
that tore across the brooding sky,
passing in flashes over Bosworth…
what does it really mean to die?

Westward like winter’s geese
I saw pale horsemen flying
while the echoes of ghostly horns,
drifted outward, fading, dying….

And on the rain-bright road
its petals teared with icy rain
lay a perfect snow-white rose…
King Richard rides again.

J.P. Reedman

 

Art by Frances Quinn

THE LEGENDARY TEN SECONDS–RICARDIAN CHRISTMAS SONG OUT SOON

 

A new single by the LEGENDARY TEN SECONDS  is being released on iTunes and Amazon on December 1.

MIDDLEHAM CASTLE ON CHRISTMAS EVE was written by Ian Churchward and Frances Quinn, who also painted the cover art, showing a ghostly party riding through the snow towards the ruined castle.

Frances, who lives in Dublin, Ireland, had this to say on her participation in The Legendary Ten Seconds’ latest project:

“I did the painting first and then got the idea for the poem-I found a photo of the castle in the snow on the net & because I painted it on blue paper it looked like nightime,so I added the ghosts & then wrote the poem. Alcohol may have played a part in it too! (laughter)
 These ideas just pop into my head. Mead of inspiration,y’know…and all that!”
Frances had been doing Ricardian themed art for several years; she also does pagan, fantasy and animal subjects–especially dogs and horses. Her artwork has appeared in John Ashdown-Hill’s THE MYTHOLOGY OF RICHARD III,  and on the covers of I RICHARD PLANTAGENET I and II by  J.P. Reedman, and N. Rose’s BEARNSHAW series.

A Slightly Different Ricardian Novel

I, RICHARD PLANTAGENET :TANTE LE DESIREE:

Richard III fiction is ‘big business’ these days, after some years of stagnation in the 1990’s and first decade of this century. Many of the new novels, in order to keep their subject matter fresh, have added fantasy elements or alternative history, or have been written from the viewpoints of invented or minor characters.
The newest Ricardian novel to appear is ‘I, Richard Plantagenet’: Tante le Desiree by J.P. Reedman. This novel, part 1 of two ( the second, due out in March deals with Richard’s accession to the throne and all that comes with it) covers Richard’s years as Duke of Gloucester, from the Battle of Barnet in 1471 through to the end of the Scottish Campaigns in 1482. Several things make this offering slightly different from the more standard novels on Richard’s life.
One is that the story is told in first person—from Richard’s point of view. Very few authors have attempted to use this first person voice—Rhoda Edwards wrote a chapter or two from Richard’s POV in her excellent novel The Broken Sword, and one other alternative novel uses it as well. However, I, Richard Plantagenet is the first novel to use Richard himself as first person narrator in a complete, detailed account of his entire adult life.
A second difference is that the book uses humour. Now, it is not in any way, shape or form a comedy book, and the battles don’t pull any punches, but the medieval world was more ribald and bawdy than many believe—just look at Geoffrey Chaucer’s works! (Interestingly, Geoffrey is related to Richard by marriage.) Many of the Ricardian novels out there are so sad and mournful (and yes, of course it is a tragic tale and many of these are wonderful books that truly stir the emotions)…but didn’t the poor guy have any fun at any time in his short life? Richard had several illegitimate children, so he must have experienced young love or lust (presumably pleasurable for him!) and no doubt, he had amusing or even raucous times with the other young men who were his friends, such as Francis Lovell and Robert Percy. And doubtless he spent what were surely enjoyable times with his wife at Middleham and Barnard castles, as well as Christmas at the Lendal in York, and attending the York Corpus Christ celebrations (he and Anne were members of the Guild) where elaborate religious plays took place in huge carts that rolled about the city. These events have been fictionalised in I, Richard Plantagenet to show that there was more to his existence than high drama and war; a lighter view of Richard’s life, you might say. (And who could resist poking a bit of fun at Anthony Woodville’s poetry?)
The dialogue used also is of a more modern style than is usual in Ricardian novels, and even (gasp!) contains occasional usage of a well-known swear word…which may seem very modern to those used to reading ‘medieval speak’ in novels but was actually in use and gaining vogue in the 15th century… This hopefully gives a slightly more natural and less formal feel; although they were nobles, these were also young men who were soldiers. Soldiers swear. They just do.
Most important perhaps, is the fact that events in Richard’s life that are lesser known or often glossed over in fiction have been included and brought to some prominence. Richard and the Bastard of Fauconberg, a little known trip to Norwich in 1471, the reburial of the Duke of York, Richard’s visit with Louis the Universal Spider at Amiens, his attendance at Prince Richard’s wedding to Anne Mowbray (along with Buckingham), and the Scottish wars all are covered, several of these in depth. Memories of the death and then the subsequent exhumation and reburial of the Duke of York are a recurring theme throughout…and foreshadow the future events in the next book (and the momentous finding of Richard within our own century.)RICHARDCOVER1net

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Richard-Plantagenet-Book-Tante-Desiree-ebook/dp/B0187RJR7E

 

Should Richard come to ours, or we go to his…?

Time-Travel - Richard 

No, I’m not about to discuss whose house to go to for a friendly drink, but about whose period in history to choose for a time-travel novel. Richard’s? Or ours? So there he is in the above picture, with Old London Bridge behind him, and the modern London Bridge in front. Is he leaving his own time to come to ours? Or taking one look at our time before staying in the 15th century?

The advent of time-travel stories about Richard has been discussed recently on Facebook, and the subject has stirred me into wanting to write about it. I am engrossed by how different people regard the enigma of Ricardian time travel. Whether to bring Richard to modern times, go back to his times, take a step sideways into a more magical world, or for no one to ever go anywhere at all. Those are the questions.

My favourite time-travel book is ‘The House on the Strand’ by Daphne du Maurier, in which her modern twentieth-century hero goes back to medieval Cornwall by means of an LSD-type new super-drug, but he is an invisible witness to everything. That, I think, is my ideal of time travel (not the LSD element!) but I’d like a convenient extra ability—to become tangible, visible and audible if I feel like it! Well, I always want to have my cake and eat it. So, if I were writing a time travel novel about Richard, I’d be going back to him, to ‘join in’ if I felt the need. Otherwise I’d remain conveniently (and safely) out of sight. But I could go anywhere I wanted. Anywhere. I’d love to do that.

But if others were going to write a time travel, have written one, or would simply like to read one, what form would it take? Forwards? Backwards? Something else? My preference you already know, so I’ll continue at this point with those who are inspired by the thought of Richard coming from his time to ours.

Here is what the author Joanne Larner has to say on the matter of her own time-travel book:-

‘When I wrote my first (and so far only) novel, ‘Richard Liveth Yet’, I decided to make it a time travel one because I was tired of reading about Richard III dying at Bosworth.  I started to think “What if he’d won, he so nearly did…?” and then I read Joan Szechtman’s novels about Richard in the 21st century and loved the idea.  She made it that there was no disruption of history by substituting a dead ‘body double’ for Richard, but I had a different plan.  Everyone who asserts that “you can’t change history” misses the point – in a work of fiction you can do whatever you like – that’s the beauty of it, surely!  I hadn’t decided whether I would have history being changed to a great extent, to a small extent or even whether changing things would ultimately end up with an identical modern day (if, for example everything was fated to some extent and history just took an alternative route to the same main conclusions).  I finally decided that I WOULD change history, but I didn’t feel the need to make it drastically different – so for example we still have Queen Elizabeth II, but she is of the House of Plantagenet. I wanted to play with some ideas in a lighthearted way, and so had Richard finding out about different modern ideas and events and using them when he went back (examples being taxing alcohol, inventing forks, composing Greensleeves and financing Christopher Columbus).  Don’t forget, time travel is impossible at this moment so writing about it has no actual limits except those of our imaginations!’

Very true. The whole point about fiction is just that. It’s fiction! So why do we impose rules upon it? There’s no need. Time is our oyster, and we can consume it however we darned well please.

Joanne’s intention is to write a sequel, which will be the reverse of the first, with the heroine going back to Richard’s time. So she is an author who is prepared to take on both aspects. A talented lady.

Another excellent writer who has whisked Richard forwards to the present day is Joan Szechtman. This is what she has to say:

  “Ever since I read, and reread A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court by Mark Twain when I was but a girl of ten, I’ve loved time travel fiction, for many reasons, not the least of which is because one can examine culture and technology with alien eyes……One point of fascination for me is the mechanism the author uses to get the time traveler from his or her now to the past or the future……Authors use a variety of literary devices to get their character from one time to another. Many use natural objects or phenomena such as the “standing stones” in Diana Gabaldon’s Outlander series. Other authors such as H.G. Wells and Michael Crichton have “invented” devices that would enable time travel. Although I fall into the latter category in that I created a device that I call a Quantum Displacement Engine, I don’t go into any great detail as to how it might work. I am aware that there are some current theories that involve quantum mechanics that might point to how time travel might be accomplished, but this aspect is at its most nascent phase. I used time travel to enable the story that I wanted to tell……

Another consideration of time travel is that the Earth, our Solar System, the galaxy, and our universe are themselves all traveling through space at incredibly high speeds. So for anyone to go into the past to a specific point on this planet, would require knowing where the Earth was in space at that time. I haven’t read any time travel novels that even hint this might need to be solved. In addition, I haven’t read any that compensate for the laws of conservation of mass and energy. I have tried to do this in my novel, and have used the laws of conservation as a plot point……Even though my inner-geek not only made me consider the scientific considerations and the improbabilities of time travel, I do agree that novels that don’t try to cover the science, or even give it a nod, are worth reading. It is up to the skill of the author to convince the reader to suspend disbelief, regardless of what mechanism the writer chooses to use……

In This Time, my first novel about Richard III in the twenty-first century, I was interested in the attitudinal and cultural differences between fifteenth-century England and twenty-first century……Time travel gave me an opportunity to not only look at these differences between now and the past, but by my bringing Richard into this time, I was able to see the world today through my main character’s eyes. I hope the people who have read or are going to read my book will experience the same.” Joan’s blog post is Time Travel in Fiction.

So, fiction and time travel must be more precise and scientifically correct to be feasible for Joan, with, among other things, hints of the theory of quantum physics and matters of mass and energy. So the way the time travel takes place is as fascinating to her as what follows, when Richard is actually here in the future.

Someone else wondered if it might be intriguing to bring Richard halfway between his time and ours, and then meet him on neutral territory, so that you/your character are both in a new century, both faced with having to learn and keep your wits about you. Together, you face the same steep learning curve. Imagine it, you and King Richard III trying to evade Roundheads one day, and Cavaliers the next. Or some such scenario.

Janet Reedman, another author of time travel—and a writer of fantasy—introduces an Otherworldly aspect to Richard’s story. She has this to say: 

‘It [time travel] seems to be a little bit controversial. I have certainly seen a number of comments in reviews saying ‘stick to the history.’ However, as a fantasy writer, I don’t have problem with fantastic elements in Ricardian fiction, as long as it can truly ‘suspend disbelief’ and does not belittle the King. In Richard’s own time Mallory had written Morte D’Arthur which was essentially mythologising a possible dark age British war-lord and making him a ‘modern’ medieval English king, and this process had been going on since the earlier Middle Ages  when the Arthurian myths were first popularised by Geoffrey of Monmouth and others. In my own novella, Sacred King, Richard is initially in the ‘Otherworld’ after death rather than in modern times, but does come, for a time, to the 21st c, after he is found at Greyfriars and ‘given back his face’ and his identity.

A fascinating alternative, I think. What is it about Richard that inspires us all with so many different and exciting fictional possibilities? He is unique. A perfect tragic hero. And we love him for it.

Rachel Walker had yet another thought.

I think having him in the future would be more enjoyable in some ways, because he would be forced to believe you, and at the same time you would not need to worry about history. Saying that, if you did travel back then if history is set I would be worried about being the actual cause of something in regards to my actions.”

Now there’s a situation to ponder. To go back and find that we actually prompt some (perhaps awful) momentous event. Not changing the course of history, but setting in motion what is known to have happened. Perhaps we tried desperately to save Richard at Bosworth, but only succeeded in triggering Sir William Stanley’s last minute intervention, and thus Richard’s death? Not a weight with which to be burdened, I think. It would be devastating to return to the present knowing you’d been the final catalyst! 

But not everyone likes even the thought of fictional time travel, as someone who wants to be known only as Iris has written to me:- 

However fanciful to think of a second chance for everybody, including our hero, I personally shrink from time-stories in general and particularly in the case of Richard because: (1) It’s the kind of wishful thinking Charles Ross accused Ricardians of when discussing real history, indulging in this sort of fantasies does not help our category. (2) As a Roman Catholic I believe our time on earth is just a passage in a longer journey and I prefer to think Richard now rests in peace and is in heaven with his wife and children.”

So, for Iris, no time travel at all involving Richard. Not even going back to his time without changing a thing, but simply observing his story unfold. Iris wants nothing at all of this nature. Perhaps she chooses not to read general Ricardian fiction either. After all, to take it to a logical conclusion, putting any thoughts or words into Richard’s mouth is wishful thinking. Fantasising. Because what he actually thought and said in any given situation is simply not known. So, even writing that he shouted “Charge!” at Bosworth would be conjecture. To me, all this is no different from time travel. It’s all invention. Guesswork. Fiction.

To use the words of Brian Wainwright (a master of words): Here’s an arcane thought for you. Is not all historical fiction a sort of time travel? Albeit, in the reader’s mind only?”  Yes, yes, Brian. That’s exactly it. Reading a novel fixed in some past time, whether the late fifteenth century or not, is an escape for us, as is science fiction about the future, or even a story set in a distant but exotic part of our present world. It’s simply escapism. Time travel of the mind.

The actual ability to transport ourselves back and forth always eludes us. Well, it does as things are at present, but perhaps a version of H.G. Wells’ time machine will one day be invented. Or something like it. “Beam me back, Scottie!” If so, how many of us will rush to book a ‘journey’. And whichever way we wish to go, full steam ahead or astern, being Ricardians, we will all want to see Richard. See him, meet him, hear him, maybe kneel before him and kiss his hand? Just imagine that. ‘Imagine’ being the key word.

King Richard III is our abiding interest, and I see nothing wrong with wishing. All we lack is that Pumpkin Coach and a convenient Fairy Godmother to make the wishes come true. So we read books that at least take our imagination to him, in whichever direction the author chooses —forward, backward, halfway or sideways. Or, of course, we don’t buy a ticket, or a book, and thus stay exactly where we are—which I don’t fancy at all.

Heigh-ho, heigh-ho, it’s back to Richard I go . . .

(The above are mere samples of people’s views on time travel, and I have no doubt there are a lot more that have not been touched upon.)

Details of time travel books by the authors mentioned above, in order of ‘appearance’:-

Joanne Larner - 1

Richard Liveth Yet: A Historical Novel Set in the Present Day

by Joanne Larner

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00XBBDMDW?*Version*=1

Author’s Facebook page for the book:

https://www.facebook.com/RichardLivethYet

Janet Reedman - 2

Sacred King: Richard III, Sinner, Sufferer, Scapegoat, Sacrifice

by J.P. Reedman.

Available on Amazon Kindle and in print.  http://www.amazon.co.uk/Sacred-King-Sufferer-Scapegoat-Sacrifice-ebook/dp/B00MFVN0UO/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&sr=&qid=

Joan Szechtman - 2

This Time by Joan Szechtman

2010 Next Generation Indie Book Awards Finalist for General Fiction/Novel

ISBN-13: 978-0982449301

http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/3935

Joan Szechtman - 1

Loyalty Binds Me by Joan Szechtman

Recommended by Midwest Book Reviews, ForeWord 2011 Book of the Year Finalist

ISBN-13: 978-1935188254

http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/61786

Both of Joan’s e-books are available on iTunes, Kobo, Sony, etc.

 

The Art of Frances Quinn

janetS6306091frances and janetFor over five hundred years, Richard the Third has been the subject of much good and bad art.  Perhaps the most famous image is the National Portrait Gallery portrait which hangs in a prominent spot (after years of being shunted into a busy stairwell at the entryway) and has for many years intrigued casual visitors as well as historians, novelists and artists.  The sensitive portrait is so at odds with the “evil uncle” myth that it is no wonder that it has spawned everything from detective novels to an entire society devoted to finding out the true story of the last English king to die in battle.  With the discovery of his remains and the amazing reconstruction of his head and face, many talented artists (including the Finnish graphic artist, Riikka Nikko) have taken to drawing and painting his handsome face.

One of the most prolific Ricardian artists on the scene today is Frances Quinn, a Dublin-based artist whose works can be seen as the cover art of novels (particularly the work of Janet Reedman) and has won a place in British historian John Ashdown-Hill’s new book “The Mythology of Richard the Third.”  I had the chance to interview Frances and find out a little bit more about the woman behind the lovely portraits of King Richard as well as her beautiful images of horses, dogs, boars and stags – particularly her rendition of Richard’s possibly mythical stallion, White Surrey.

Frances, can you give us some background on your art education and something about your life in Ireland?

I’ve had no art training at all; I’m entirely self-taught.  Having said that, the artistic streak runs in my mother’s side of the family.  I have a cousin and an uncle who are artists as well.  I live on the outskirts of Dublin in what used to be a country village until the developers got hold of it.  I left school at seventeen and as I couldn’t afford to go to art college, I went to work in the bookmaking business.  I now work part-time, in order to spend more time at my art.

How would you describe your work?

My style of art is semi-realistic; I suppose it’s more of an illustrative style than strictly ‘art.’  I use mostly gouache and watercolours but I also use coloured pencil and occasionally water based oils – but they take too long to dry to my liking!

frances quinn

How did you get involved in illustrating books?

I used to do illustrations for fanzines in the 80s and 90s, so it was a natural progression to move to books.  I’ve done several covers and John Ashdown-Hill has used one of my paintings in his latest book on the mythology of Richard the Third.  John was here in Ireland last year to give a talk and the Irish Richard the Third group presented him with one of my paintings.  He must have liked it as he asked if he could use the painting of Richard and White Surrey.

I can see why he liked it.  Can you tell us why and when you became interested in Richard the Third?  Is there another historical figure that interests you as much as he does?

I’ve always been interested in Richard the Third.  Something about him fascinated me and after I read “The Daughter of Time” in the early 80s, I tried to find out as much as I could about him.  About the only decent book available then was Paul M. Kendall’s biography “Richard the Third.”  The only other historical figure that I was interested in was Tutankhammun!  I think artists as drawn to subjects that have a touch of the mythic about them; Richard has so much of the “sacrificial” mythos characteristics, he’s a perfect study for any  artist or writer.

Do you have a studio?

I don’t have a specific studio but my front room doubles as my ‘aetelier’ – which sounds very grand.  Actually, it’s just a room of art supplies, books and bits of taxidermy.

How can we buy your work?

If anyone’s interested in buying my art, they can contact me either on my Facebook page “The Art of Frances Quinn” or email me at echdhu@yahoo.ie.

Thanks, Frances.  I’ll let you get back to work.

frances richard and white surrey

J.P. Reedman’s novels and short stories can be found on Amazon.com.

Top right:  left to right, Frances Quinn and Janet Reedman

Robin Hood as you have never met him before….

Robin Hood - Vampire Lord

This is my review of J. P. Reedman’s excellent story ROBIN HOOD – VAMPIRE LORD:-

Was Robin Hood real? Or a fantasy? J.P. Reedman’s Robin is definitely fantasy. More than that, he is fantasy that becomes entangled with horror. The title, ROBIN HOOD – VAMPIRE LORD prepares you for what follows, when the Robin we all know and love falls victim to the vampire Abbess of Kirklees, who wants him as her mate into eternity. Except that she neglects to ask him if this is what he wants too, and simply goes ahead to prey upon him anyway. Only too successfully. Before he knows it, Robin is one of the undead. And he hates himself, even as he struggles against his vile new need for blood. For him, the death of others is now the only way to preserve his own life, but the very idea revolts him. Can he fight against the dreadful fate bestowed upon him by the False Abbess? From somewhere he finds the strength to defy her, and his punishment is to be incarcerated in a stone coffin, so that soon, to the world outside, he is but a memory . . . and then a timeless legend. But Robin lives on, undead and buried, and awakens in a strange land, where Vlad the Impaler, Dracula, is the prince. Robin soon discovers he has a very eerie affinity with Vlad. I will not say more about this unusual story, except that it is Robin Hood as you have never met him before. If you have a fancy for Robin Hood of the Otherworld, this is definitely for you.

Now I like a good spooky story, especially when Hallowe’en is in the air. So, hoping for some hairs to stand on end, I took my Kindle with me on a recent break at 14th-century Dartington Hall in Devon. Come dusk, I went alone into the empty great hall, where every step echoes, and the sounds of the rest of the building are muffled. Then I became immersed in this shiversome story of vampires and the true eternity of Robin Hood. Hmm, all very well and good to give myself the heebie-jeebies, but afterwards I had to get from the great hall, along the screens passage and out beneath the porch to . . . .the wide, dark courtyard, where the lights of the lodgings on either side shone through the night. Suddenly it was a l-o-n-g way to the East Wing, my husband and the safety of our room.

It is with some honesty that I say my feet fair flew!

The book can be purchased at Amazon.com http://www.amazon.com/Robin-Hood-Vampire-Lord-J-P-Reedman-ebook/dp/B00KDIM34K/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1414774385&sr=1-1&keywords=robin+hood+-+vampire+lord and at Amazon.co.uk http://www.amazon.co.uk/Robin-Hood-Vampire-Lord-J-P-Reedman-ebook/dp/B00KDIM34K/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1414774493&sr=8-1&keywords=robin+hood+-+vampire+lord

Just make sure the doors and windows are locked when you read it . . .

PS – I also came out of that great hall with a ghost story of my own to write.  Thank you Dartington, and above all, thank you J P Reedman!

 

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