Hair today, gone tomorrow (4) – A prodigal lock of hair….

  Years ago, not quite before the Flood, although it feels like it now, I went to Tewkesbury Abbey with my husband and we saw a flat glass display cabinet containing a number of ancient locks of hair. I was writing a book called “Wife to the Kingmaker” at the time, so I was particularly… Continue reading Hair today, gone tomorrow (4) – A prodigal lock of hair….

Isabel Neville’s body arrives at Tewkesbury Abbey….

I have taken the following information and references from this article, so I do not claim the hard work for myself! The corpse of Isabel, Duchess of Clarence (†1476) was brought to Tewkesbury Abbey in Gloucestershire.[1] A monastic chronicle describes how it arrived there on 4 January 1477 and remained in the middle of the… Continue reading Isabel Neville’s body arrives at Tewkesbury Abbey….

The Royal Progress of Richard III

Following his coronation, Richard III – like all medieval monarchs – went on his “royal progress” through the realm.  Along with an entourage in excess of 200 household men, ecclesiastics, supporters, and administrative officials, he visited towns and cities as far west as the River Severn, as far north as the River Ouse, and as… Continue reading The Royal Progress of Richard III

Which flower was designated for Richard’s birthday? And which saint was for that flower….?

Lurking among the many books around my home is a little booklet called A Calendar of Flowers and Their Saints, subtitled“A Flower for Every Day. A Saint for Every Flower.” It has no publication date, but is stamped Writers Service Bureau, London W.C. 1. Its pages are brown at the edges, there’s a teacup stain… Continue reading Which flower was designated for Richard’s birthday? And which saint was for that flower….?

If things had been different, might Richard and George have been buried at Fotheringhay….?

It occurs to me to wonder if Richard intended to be lain to rest at Fotheringhay with his father, the 3rd Duke of York, and brother, Edmund of Rutland. Wouldn’t he think he belonged with them – no matter how fond he was of his beloved Yorkshire? Of course, things changed radically when he became… Continue reading If things had been different, might Richard and George have been buried at Fotheringhay….?

Warwick, the “Kingmaker” in Dartmouth….

  The following quote is an interesting glimpse of Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick, the “Kingmaker”, in the spring of 1470, when it was prudent for him to leave England for a while. It is taken from Devon, its Moorlands, Streams & Coasts by Lady Rosalind Northcote, published 1908 by Chatto & Windus.. See here… Continue reading Warwick, the “Kingmaker” in Dartmouth….

Secret Marriages – Edward IV & his Two Wives, the Novel

Over the years there has been lots of fiction written about Edward IV, Elizabeth Woodville and of course Richard III. However, there is one one figure in their story who often gets a mention, but  is rarely portrayed as a living person, with the events long after her death in 1468 taking the forefront instead. … Continue reading Secret Marriages – Edward IV & his Two Wives, the Novel

Sir James Tyrrell – Sheriff of Glamorgan

As we said in an earlier article,“ Richard III appointed James Tyrrell Sherriff of Glamorgan and Constable of Cardiff in 1477. The importance of Glamorgan is little understood or recognised in Ricardian Studies, but this was certainly a key job and one of the most important at Richard’s disposal. The practical effect, given that Richard… Continue reading Sir James Tyrrell – Sheriff of Glamorgan

Edward of Middleham: the prince of Richard III

  Edward of York, better known as Edward of Middleham, was the only legitimate son of King Richard III and his Queen, Anne Neville. Edward was thought to have been born in Middleham Castle in December 1473, but this date is not certain. The historian Charles Ross wrote that this date “lacks authority” and was… Continue reading Edward of Middleham: the prince of Richard III

l’Erber – the Kingmaker’s lost London home….

  We’ve all heard of l’Erber (various spellings), but perhaps its history and location are not as easily recalled. The following article is from The History Geeks. I tried to give a direct link, but Facebook tells me the article is no longer available. I had found it through a Google search, and have copied… Continue reading l’Erber – the Kingmaker’s lost London home….