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Archive for the tag “Ipswich”

More sport and history – C17 this time

November is upon usheader16 and speedway fans in the northern hemisphere are now in hibernation, but at least two or three of the top clubs owe their roots to the events of the seventeenth century. Following our article on rugby clubs and the “Wars of the Roses” , here they are:

2017 PREMIERSHIP:
Somerset Rebels are based at the Oak Tree Arena, Edithmead, which is about twelve miles from Westonzoyland, where the Battle of Sedgemoor took place on 6 July 1685 as the last stage of the Monmouth Rebellion. Had speedway existed then, this would have been close to the middle of the season.
Rye House Rockets are based by the residence near Hoddesdon where there was an April 1683 plot, also involving the Duke of Monmouth, to assassinate Charles II and James Duke of York on their return from Newmarket. It failed possibly because the royal brothers were prevented from watching the horse racing by a fire. A dozen executions (at Tyburn, Smithfield and Tower Hill) and a suicide, the Earl of Essex, followed. The surviving plotters fled to exile and returned for the rebellion two years later.

2017 CHAMPIONSHIP:
Ipswich Witches are surely named for more than just the sake of assonance. The town was not quite the epicentre of Matthew Hopkins’ activities as “Witchfinder General”. Up to 300 people were executed within a forty mile radius of Ipswich between 1642-7 as a result of his activities. Hopkins was the son of a Puritan rector of Framlingham and then Great Wenham, where Matthew was born. He died at about twenty-seven in Manningtree, where he had been based..

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The sinister secret of the Cornhill, Ipswich

This is about to undergo a little refurbishment. The first picture shows the eastern approach to the Cornhill, where heresy executions took place during the sixteenth century, whilst the others are from the monument in Christchurch Park.

See also: https://murreyandblue.wordpress.com/2016/07/23/a-colchester-mystery/ or https://murreyandblue.wordpress.com/2014/02/04/an-afternoon-in-hadleigh-2006/

The Friaries and Priories of Ipswich

wolseys-gate-1

On the bottom left is the Buttermarket Centre, formerly the home of the Whitefriars or Carmelites. There were Greyfriars (Franciscans, whose name survives near Princes Street) and Blackfriars (Dominicans, based near St. Mary’s Quay).

The mid-“Tudor” Christchurch Mansion, on the bottom right, is on the site of the Holy Trinity Priory. Whether this was newly built or merely adapted, is presently uncertain. There was also a Priory of St. Peter and St. Paul, partially replaced by Wolsey’s Gate (above).

ButtermarketCentre Christchurch_Mansion

Who is this a portrait of?

It is reputed to be Jane, who was executed in February 1554 at the age of about seventeen. She looks a little older than that to us, but teenagers’ dress sense has changed in the space of 460 years and most of her portraits date from at least forty years after her lifetime.

This, by an unknown artist in about 1590 and inscribed “Lady Jayne”, is known as the Streatham Portrait but was purchased in Ipswich between 1890 and 1910 by a regular customer of Green’s, a bookseller and antique dealer based near the Central Library until comparatively recently. It can be viewed at the National Portrait Gallery but has been the subject of controversy since its rediscovery. Leading art dealer Christopher Foley has authenticated it but David Starkey disagrees. Of course, it may not be the original.

So what do you think? Here is a similar case.

Red Rose Chain presents… Shakespeare’s Richard III

Richard-III-e-poster

Yes, it’s Shakespeare. Yes, it’s a travesty of history. But Joanna Carrick is a terrific director, and Red Rose Chain a terrific company of actors. Buy your tickets soon!

Shakespeare’s Richard III

Wolsey’s objective finally achieved

UCSWolseywolseys-gate-1

Nearly five hundred years after Thomas Wolsey sought to establish an independent University in Ipswich, this will finally happen from 1 August this year:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-suffolk-36307221

Wolsey’s Gate is all that remains of Cardinal College:
https://ipswichhistory.wordpress.com/2014/04/19/wolseys-gate/

 

Richard, as interpreted by Frank Spencer…!

Frank Spencer plays RIII

Just when I thought adaptations of the Bard’s Richard could not get any worse, I find this. OK, not Frank Spencer, just his tank top.

http://tinyurl.com/horbrj6

 

An article on Old Ipswich …

… which, sadly, refers to the Old Cattle Market as a venue but doesn’t discuss the previous purpose – a cattle market that I visited in c.1980, just before it was demolished to build the new bus station.

The cattle had just left after the day’s trading although I can still visualise the building. The market had several previous locations, such as the part of Princes Street that hosted HMRC until last year , where oxen often escaped to roam among the tight-knit streets nearby:

http://www.eadt.co.uk/news/ipswich_icons_old_cattle_market_just_the_ticket_for_growing_service_1_4075300

The “Colourblind Cartographer” came to Ipswich

Many of you will remember reading, perhaps in “The Last Days of Richard III”, how John Speed went to Leicester looking for the site of the Greyfriars but confused it with the Blackfriars which was in a far worse state of repair thus no royal body could possibly have survived.

Yesterday, I lunched at the “Robert Ransome” in Ipswich – table 22 in case you ask. On the wall were several interesting photos, including Speed’s 1610 Ipswich map. Apart from his unaccountable failure to include the railway station, it compares well with the town four centuries later.

Felaw Maltings, Ipswich

 

FELAW MALTINGS

        THE PAST

 

Richard Felaw was a former bailiff

And MP for Ipswich.

Born in 1420, he was also a commercial agent of Sir John Howard, Duke of Norfolk and the two men were closely involved in the development of Ipswich port.

When he died in 1483, Richard left his house in Foundation Street as a grammar school for boys. One pupil was Thomas Wolsey, later Cardinal to Henry VIII.

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