Margaret of Anjou was married to Henry IV, Bosworth was in 1495 and Edward VI won at Tewkesbury….!

When an article is entitled War of the Roses: A Brief Timeline, subtitled ‘Emily Hewat gives a crash course on the history behind Yorkshire and Lancaster’s epic rivalry and the origin of the Roses Tournament itself’ one rather expects the correct times! But no. What you find is:- “….Our story starts in 1454 with the… Continue reading Margaret of Anjou was married to Henry IV, Bosworth was in 1495 and Edward VI won at Tewkesbury….!

The tapestries of Thomas Wolsey

We have recently come across this rather interesting article, extracted from Reyes y Prelados, by Emma Luisa Cahill Marron (excuse the missing accent) about Cardinal Wolsey and some of his artefacts. The original is in Spanish and here is a translation, by ladychaol.

Sorry, Frederick Forsyth and John Stonehouse, but Henry VII did it first

I expect you all know the basic premise of Forsyth’s The Day of the Jackal (published in 1971). A mysterious and ruthless assassin obtains a birth certificate and passport in the name of someone who died as a child, before setting out to kill de Gaulle. In 1974, John Stonehouse followed this method by “borrowing”… Continue reading Sorry, Frederick Forsyth and John Stonehouse, but Henry VII did it first

Did Edward III, Richard II and Henry VII look like this….?

  My internet travels take me here, there and everywhere…and today I came upon another site about facial reconstructions of past figures of consequence. There have been quite a few of these in recent years, and this one is an interesting addition. Well, addition for me, it may have been around for quite some time.… Continue reading Did Edward III, Richard II and Henry VII look like this….?

A property sale in Suffolk

Here is an East Anglian Daily Times article about Lamarsh Hall near Sudbury, which is for sale. It is Grade II listed and thought to date from c.1485, apparently built for the Beaufort family. Obviously, by 1471, the only legitimate “Beauforts” remaining were the two Margarets, first cousins who had vacated that surname by marriage… Continue reading A property sale in Suffolk

WILLIAM CATESBY, GOOD GUY, BAD GUY, TRAITOR? THE CLUES IN HIS WILL

REBLOGGED FROM A MEDIEVAL POTPOURRI sparkypus.com Brass of William Catesby,  Ashby St Ledgers Church.   Commissioned by William’s son in 1507.  Date of death 20th August is incorrect, predating Bosworth,  perhaps in an attempt to cover up his inglorious end.  Note the damage across the neck.  Photo Aidan McRae Thomas Flkir As no doubt can be seen… Continue reading WILLIAM CATESBY, GOOD GUY, BAD GUY, TRAITOR? THE CLUES IN HIS WILL

V.B. Lamb’s unanswered questions

(see this article) If Henry VII “knew” that Edward IV‘s sons were dead by the time of his accession, why did he take nineteen years to produce any “evidence”, particularly when two individuals appeared claiming to be one or both of those “Princes” in 1487 and 1491? If he “knew” that Edward IV hadn’t committed… Continue reading V.B. Lamb’s unanswered questions

The “Princes in the Tower” are to get their very own opera….

  The myth of the “Princes in the Tower” is about to be turned into an opera. I notice too that their disappearance is immediately described as “one of history’s most notorious unsolved crimes”. What crime? No one knows if there ever was one, let alone that poor old Richard was responsible. It has always… Continue reading The “Princes in the Tower” are to get their very own opera….

Myths aren’t facts; least of all myths about Richard III….

Ricardians often bemoan the repeated myths about Richard’s wickedness and cruelty. And with good reason. In spite of the fact that he did what he could to better the lot of women, he is accused of bullying the poor old (treacherous) Countess of Oxford because she happened to be financing her Lancastrian son who was… Continue reading Myths aren’t facts; least of all myths about Richard III….