Ralph, 3rd Baron Cromwell was unbelievably cruel and bullying to an innocent woman….

  Examples of the atrocious treatment meted to women “of property” by voracious, conscienceless men continue to flow, and this time the name Cromwell is to the fore. In the 1430s a certain Elizabeth Whitfield, née Swillington fell into the clutches of Ralph, 3rd Baron Cromwell, as follows: From this link  :- “….Pa L 2: Extract… Continue reading Ralph, 3rd Baron Cromwell was unbelievably cruel and bullying to an innocent woman….

THE TUDOR CROWN UNEARTHED

A metal detector enthusiast has come up with an impressive find that may be worth a cool £2 million. Tucked away in a hole in a field field near Market Harborough was a tiny figure made of pure gold. This figure is believed to be from the ‘Tudor Crown’ designed by Henry VII for state… Continue reading THE TUDOR CROWN UNEARTHED

The many wonders of medieval Caversham

Caversham is just across the Thames from Reading. The present bridge carrying the main road between the two places is modern, but it is more or less on the site of a medieval stone and timber bridge, dating from between 1163 and 1231. Sources vary as to whether it had one, two or three chapels,… Continue reading The many wonders of medieval Caversham

Kings made of glass….?

What does one call a gathering of glass men? Splinters? Shards? It seems that in the medieval period there was a sudden upsurge of people who believed they—or part of their bodies—were made of glass. Heads, buttocks, entire bodies, whatever, and the belief was so strong and irresistible that some of them resorted to shocking… Continue reading Kings made of glass….?

Let’s compare Anne Neville and Elizabeth Woodville, the two queens of York . . . .

“ . . . . The role of consort can make or break a monarchy. Some have seen their reign saved by the energies of their spouse while others have seen their power waver because of their consort’s actions. Here, we look at the consorts of the House of York . . . .” Thus… Continue reading Let’s compare Anne Neville and Elizabeth Woodville, the two queens of York . . . .

Henry VII, the posh schoolboy….?

This Kent Online article, about Sir Henry Wyatt (1460–1536) of Allington Castle, seems to be anti-Richard, but actually goes some way to exonerating him. And while I having sneaking admiration for the cat (see illustration below) which saved Wyatt from starvation in prison by bringing him pigeons, she isn’t what riveted my attention on the… Continue reading Henry VII, the posh schoolboy….?

GREAT BALLS OF FIRE! CHARLES VI OF FRANCE

On January 28, 1393, Charles VI decided to partake in the  Bal des Sauvages, the Ball of the Wild Men, a masquerade ball in which the ruler joined with gusto, joining a party of five other nobles to perform a frenzied dance dressed as a ‘woodwose’–a Wild Man of the forest. Unfortunately, the Ball ended… Continue reading GREAT BALLS OF FIRE! CHARLES VI OF FRANCE

The Traitor’s Arms?

In 1840 workmen carrying out repairs to St Bartholomew’s Church, Ashperton, Herefordshire were collecting stones from the ruins of a nearby manor house when they discovered a heavy stone plaque, carved with an elaborate coat of arms, among the rubble. The stone was taken to the church for safekeeping and has hung on the wall… Continue reading The Traitor’s Arms?

Henry V: one of the most influential kings of England….

“…Henry IV [Bolingbroke, as Duke of Lancaster] returned to England and became swept up in the Lancastrian campaign to unseat Richard…” Come on, Henry IV was the Lancastrian campaign! He certainly wasn’t an innocent bystander who was swept along in the stampede. You’ll never convince me he didn’t return to England intent upon getting rid… Continue reading Henry V: one of the most influential kings of England….

Anne Herbert Countess of Pembroke, Yorkist widow & mother in law to Katherine Plantagenet

Reblogged from sparkypus.com A Medieval Potpourri Anne Devereux, John Lydgate’s Troy Book and Siege of Thebes @British Library Well that old wheel of fortune could certainly whizz around and no more so than in the lives of the noble women from the turbulent times we now know as the Wars of the Roses.  An example… Continue reading Anne Herbert Countess of Pembroke, Yorkist widow & mother in law to Katherine Plantagenet