The ruby that isn’t a ruby was worn at a battle that didn’t happen….?

    Aha, so it isn’t a ruby, see this article. Well, we knew that! But for all its associations with the Black Prince, Henry V and Richard III (to say nothing of later monarchs) it seems our present queen “….often likes to think of it being worn by Henry IV during the battle of… Continue reading The ruby that isn’t a ruby was worn at a battle that didn’t happen….?

Some Shakespeare scenes re-written

Henry V DRIVER (presses bell) BUTLER (opens door) DRIVER: Mr. Monmouth? BUTLER: Sorry, he is busy at the moment. DRIVER: Dauphin’s Sporting Goods here. I have a delivery for him; can he spare a moment to sign for it? Otherwise I’ll probably have to take it back to the warehouse. BUTLER: He is with some… Continue reading Some Shakespeare scenes re-written

Kings made of glass….?

What does one call a gathering of glass men? Splinters? Shards? It seems that in the medieval period there was a sudden upsurge of people who believed they—or part of their bodies—were made of glass. Heads, buttocks, entire bodies, whatever, and the belief was so strong and irresistible that some of them resorted to shocking… Continue reading Kings made of glass….?

Hair today, gone tomorrow (4) – A prodigal lock of hair….

  Years ago, not quite before the Flood, although it feels like it now, I went to Tewkesbury Abbey with my husband and we saw a flat glass display cabinet containing a number of ancient locks of hair. I was writing a book called “Wife to the Kingmaker” at the time, so I was particularly… Continue reading Hair today, gone tomorrow (4) – A prodigal lock of hair….

Henry VII’s lavish gift to his daughter….

Oh dear, how very Henry VII. I’ve just read in this link that because the leek was the emblem of the Welsh, on one St David’s Day he presented a leek to his daughter. A real leek, that is, not one studded with precious stones. Talk about a cheap gift! I’m sure she was thrilled.… Continue reading Henry VII’s lavish gift to his daughter….

Henry V: one of the most influential kings of England….

“…Henry IV [Bolingbroke, as Duke of Lancaster] returned to England and became swept up in the Lancastrian campaign to unseat Richard…” Come on, Henry IV was the Lancastrian campaign! He certainly wasn’t an innocent bystander who was swept along in the stampede. You’ll never convince me he didn’t return to England intent upon getting rid… Continue reading Henry V: one of the most influential kings of England….

Anne Herbert Countess of Pembroke, Yorkist widow & mother in law to Katherine Plantagenet

Reblogged from sparkypus.com A Medieval Potpourri Anne Devereux, John Lydgate’s Troy Book and Siege of Thebes @British Library Well that old wheel of fortune could certainly whizz around and no more so than in the lives of the noble women from the turbulent times we now know as the Wars of the Roses.  An example… Continue reading Anne Herbert Countess of Pembroke, Yorkist widow & mother in law to Katherine Plantagenet

Useful Shakespearean Insults for every Occasion….

Reblogged from A Medieval Potpourri sparkypus.com William Shakespeare @Abdul Rahim One, or two,  of these  may come in useful the next time you find yourself lost for words……. “Villain, I have done thy mother” (Really rude and should only be used in the event you don’t mind your lights being punched out..) Titus Andronicus (Act 4,… Continue reading Useful Shakespearean Insults for every Occasion….

OLD LONDON BRIDGE – A MEDIEVAL WONDER!

REBLOGGED FROM sparkypus.com A Medieval Potpourri  London from Southwark, c.1630. Old London Bridge is in the right foreground and Old St Paul’s Cathedral on the skyline to the left.  Old London Bridge Antiquated, in a run down state, and at 600 years old, the old bridge had reached its self by date and was demolished in… Continue reading OLD LONDON BRIDGE – A MEDIEVAL WONDER!