Two Lancastrian King Henrys and their use of prophecies….

  “Today it is hard to credit the importance that the Middle Ages attached to prophecies, at that time taken so seriously that King Henry VII was to declare them against the law on the grounds of political danger.” The above quote is taken from The Usurper King by Marie Louise Bruce, the usurper of… Continue reading Two Lancastrian King Henrys and their use of prophecies….

Henry IV and That Hat….!

Henry Bolingbroke (Duke of Lancaster, soon-to-be the usurper Henry IV) was in mourning for his father John of Gaunt when he returned to England from exile and stole the throne of his first cousin, Richard II. I won’t go into all the details because what I’m about to write is rather, um, facetious. Apparently on… Continue reading Henry IV and That Hat….!

The Audley Case of 1431 Redux

We originally posted on this issue here. In summary, in 1431 or thereabouts, Alianore, Lady Audley, and her husband James were trying to demonstrate in the Church court that Alianore was legitimate and thus the heiress of her father, Edmund, Earl of Kent by Constance of York. Kent’s surviving sisters and the heirs of the… Continue reading The Audley Case of 1431 Redux

The real meaning of “Year of Grace”….

Yes, I’m saying it again: one does learn something new every day. This time it’s an explanation of the phrase ‘Year of Grace’. I had not really given it any thought at all, imagining it simply meant the year granted by God’s Grace. Well, in point of fact, it does mean that, but not in… Continue reading The real meaning of “Year of Grace”….

Let’s compare Anne Neville and Elizabeth Woodville, the two queens of York . . . .

“ . . . . The role of consort can make or break a monarchy. Some have seen their reign saved by the energies of their spouse while others have seen their power waver because of their consort’s actions. Here, we look at the consorts of the House of York . . . .” Thus… Continue reading Let’s compare Anne Neville and Elizabeth Woodville, the two queens of York . . . .

The Traitor’s Arms?

In 1840 workmen carrying out repairs to St Bartholomew’s Church, Ashperton, Herefordshire were collecting stones from the ruins of a nearby manor house when they discovered a heavy stone plaque, carved with an elaborate coat of arms, among the rubble. The stone was taken to the church for safekeeping and has hung on the wall… Continue reading The Traitor’s Arms?

Henry V: one of the most influential kings of England….

“…Henry IV [Bolingbroke, as Duke of Lancaster] returned to England and became swept up in the Lancastrian campaign to unseat Richard…” Come on, Henry IV was the Lancastrian campaign! He certainly wasn’t an innocent bystander who was swept along in the stampede. You’ll never convince me he didn’t return to England intent upon getting rid… Continue reading Henry V: one of the most influential kings of England….

The Tudors were a “typically Welsh family”….!

 Today in 1495 marked the death of Henry VII’s uncle, Jasper Tudor, and so seems an appropriate day for me to post the following extract, which is from The Country Gentry in the Fourteenth Century by N. Denholm-Young, published in 1969. “…It is a crying fault among English historians that they pay only lip-service to… Continue reading The Tudors were a “typically Welsh family”….!

Useful Shakespearean Insults for every Occasion….

Reblogged from A Medieval Potpourri sparkypus.com William Shakespeare @Abdul Rahim One, or two,  of these  may come in useful the next time you find yourself lost for words……. “Villain, I have done thy mother” (Really rude and should only be used in the event you don’t mind your lights being punched out..) Titus Andronicus (Act 4,… Continue reading Useful Shakespearean Insults for every Occasion….

What were our medieval kings’ voices like….?

Today I once again heard Henry VIII described as Bluff King Hal. Well, this is usually said almost affectionately, which the Henry VIII we all know does not warrant. He was a monster. I think his voice was probably stentorian. Eventually he was downright nasty and needed to be approached with an excessively long bargepole.… Continue reading What were our medieval kings’ voices like….?