It’s 1773, and Richard III is King of Great Britain….!

  Could someone tell me how a document from 1773 could be signed by “King Richard III of Great Britain”? I rather think it’s a goof for George III. Richard didn’t know about Great Britain (George III had England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales—oh, and Hanover, Richard didn’t have Scotland or Hanover, but claimed France), So… Continue reading It’s 1773, and Richard III is King of Great Britain….!

Where our dead kings and queens are buried….

This link is to a brief article about a book about where our kings and queens are buried. I have not read the book, British¬†Royal¬†Tombs by Aiden Dodson, so cannot comment upon it. You’ll find it here on Amazon I believe the image below is taken from the book.

Five important royals who didn’t ascend the throne….

Would these be your five? Or do you have other suggestions? PS Who can spot their deliberate mistake?

That lawyer in Utah …

As you can see from the article, the author (Tom Leonard) knows the answer to be in the negative because the Royal Marriages Act 1772 precludes the descendants of George II from marrying without the sovereign’s consent – that sovereign being George III at the time. James Ord’s putative ancestor is another James Ord, born… Continue reading That lawyer in Utah …

Use of the Salic Law

A Salic Law (dating from c.507-11) stated, among other things, that a kingdom must be inherited agnatically. Women are to be excluded from the Crown, as are men who would only inherit through the male line. How did this affect different European countries? FRANCE: applied more rigidly as time went on, precedents being created in… Continue reading Use of the Salic Law