Another car park associated with Richard

This one is in his ducal city of Gloucester and covers the remains of the local Whitefriars, dating from about 1270, not long after the Carmelites arrived in England, but demolished nearly three centuries. It was discovered during the building of the King’s Quarter. There were four other priories in Gloucester and we wrote about… Continue reading Another car park associated with Richard

A hidden glory in a tiny alley in Gloucester….

Since the middle of the last century the city of Gloucester has been spoiled by dubious, half-witted planning decisions, but there are still some wonderful gems to be found. Everyone knows the cathedral, of course (thankfully it escaped planning notice, or it too might have been “improved” in finest 1960s fashion. Heaven forfend indeed. But… Continue reading A hidden glory in a tiny alley in Gloucester….

Medieval spies….

Thanks to a post on the Richard III Society Forum, I was steered to the following interesting Ian Arthurson article about medieval spying. We know that the Tudors excelled in this dangerous world, but it’s not so well known that it was quite rife during the Wars of the Roses as well. Royalty—and the Church—always… Continue reading Medieval spies….

Gloucester on 28th October, 1378, 1483 and 1967….

28th October is a notable day for me because of three events in Gloucester’s history:- (1) It was the day my second favourite king, Richard II was in Gloucester and Tewkesbury—well, he was from 20th October 1378 until mid-November, so had to be in one or the other on the 28th. (2) It was also… Continue reading Gloucester on 28th October, 1378, 1483 and 1967….

The Royal Progress of Richard III

Following his coronation, Richard III – like all medieval monarchs – went on his “royal progress” through the realm.  Along with an entourage in excess of 200 household men, ecclesiastics, supporters, and administrative officials, he visited towns and cities as far west as the River Severn, as far north as the River Ouse, and as… Continue reading The Royal Progress of Richard III

Edward I and nursery rhymes go together….um, no, they don’t….!

  Well, I associate Edward I with many things, but not children’s nursery rhymes. I can imagine him being used to frighten them witless, but not to sing and chant with humour. Anyway, according to this site two of our oldest rhymes are due to old Longshanks. I find it hard to believe the Dr… Continue reading Edward I and nursery rhymes go together….um, no, they don’t….!

More musical connections?

This nursery rhyme, although not mediaeval, is early modern and is supposed to refer to a monarch just a few places after Richard III. Here (left) we have the Martyrs’ Memorial near Balliol College, Oxford, that commemorates three of Mary I’s most prominent victims: Archbishop Cranmer and Bishops Latimer and Ridley. They were not the only… Continue reading More musical connections?

Another site of maps old and new….

I have just learned of another site that allows one to see a local area in maps past and present. Interesting, and worth bookmarking. Only West of England at the moment, as far as I can see. Let’s hope the rest of the country is eventually given the same coverage. The illustration shows the part of Gloucester… Continue reading Another site of maps old and new….

Another myth about men “not breaking oaths to Richard”. . . .

Well, I’ve heard the tale of Sir Rhys ap Thomas hiding under a bridge for Henry to march over him on the way to Bosworth, thus not breaking Sir Rhys’s oath of loyalty to Richard, but this is a new one on me! Now we have this new variation, from  http://tudortimes.co.uk/military-warfare/1485-battle-of-bosworth/henrys-march :- “. . .when… Continue reading Another myth about men “not breaking oaths to Richard”. . . .

ST OSWALD’S IN GLOUCESTER–A TOWER FOUND

The scanty arches of St Oswald’s Priory lie tucked in a Gloucester suburb  a few minutes walk  from  the cathedral. Once a place of great importance, it was the burial spot of Queen Aethelflaed, daughter of Alfred the Great. She was a warrior-queen who fought the Vikings. Henry of Huntingdon wrote this about her– Heroic… Continue reading ST OSWALD’S IN GLOUCESTER–A TOWER FOUND