Myths aren’t facts; least of all myths about Richard III….

Ricardians often bemoan the repeated myths about Richard’s wickedness and cruelty. And with good reason. In spite of the fact that he did what he could to better the lot of women, he is accused of bullying the poor old (treacherous) Countess of Oxford because she happened to be financing her Lancastrian son who was… Continue reading Myths aren’t facts; least of all myths about Richard III….

THE CHILDREN OF JOHN NEVILLE, MARQUIS OF MONTAGU and EARL OF NORTHUMBERLAND d.1471

Reblogged from A Medieval Potpourri sparkypus.com The Smythe monument Elford Church.  Photo Aidan McRae Thomson Of the four sons of Richard Neville,  Earl of Salisbury, only two, Richard Earl of Warwick and John Marquis of Montagu had children.    Warwick, who would go on to  become known as the ‘Kingmaker’,  had two daughters, while  John who… Continue reading THE CHILDREN OF JOHN NEVILLE, MARQUIS OF MONTAGU and EARL OF NORTHUMBERLAND d.1471

MISIDENTIFIED HISTORICAL PORTRAITS INCLUDING TUDOR QUEENS…

Reblogged from MISIDENTIFIED HISTORICAL PORTRAITS INCLUDING TUDOR QUEENS… Does anyone else like me get irritated by misidentified portraits of historical characters?  Is it that difficult to get correct? It’s quite sloppy to be honest as just a quick glance at them tells you something ain’t quite right here!  It’s particularly common around  16th century portraiture when… Continue reading MISIDENTIFIED HISTORICAL PORTRAITS INCLUDING TUDOR QUEENS…

No longer passing the Buc(k)?

Now for some very interesting news: Arthur Kincaid’s The History of King Richard the Third is set for a new edition, based on forty years of further research. Kincaid has managed to distinguish the forensic research of Sir George Buc (1560-1622), whose great-grandfather fought at Bosworth and whose grandfather was at Flodden, from that of… Continue reading No longer passing the Buc(k)?

Two butchers, an archer and a “bourgeois of Tournai”….

“….Consider, for example, the case of John Sperhauk, which came before King’s Bench in April 1402. The plea roll record opens with the memorandum of his confession taken on 13 April by the coroner of King’s Bench, before the king and ‘by [his] authority and command’. In this confession, Sperhauk admitted to publicly repeating allegations… Continue reading Two butchers, an archer and a “bourgeois of Tournai”….

Henrys, Ancient and Modern….!

Well, the hymn book was never like this, I grant. No hymn numbers here. Instead we have a forgotten Rolling Stone, because if ever there was one, here he is! I can just picture him up on stage giving it some wellie with Mick, Keith & Co. Not that he’d be enjoying himself, that’s for… Continue reading Henrys, Ancient and Modern….!

Vastern – a little known Yorkist manor

In 1376 King Edward III granted the manors of Vastern and Wootton to his son Edmund, Earl of Cambridge. The manors adjoin, with Wootton know better known as Royal Wootton Basset, Wiltshire. Vastern Manor still exists, although it has been extensively rebuilt. The core of the stucture is, however, said to be fifteenth century. It… Continue reading Vastern – a little known Yorkist manor

THE PASSING OF ELIZABETH OF YORK – A ROYAL COINCIDENCE

Reblogged from A Medieval Potpourri sparkypus.com A young Henry weeping on the empty bed of his dead mother Elizabeth of York.  His two sisters Margaret and Mary sit at the foot of the bed.  From the Vaux Passional, in the National Library of Wales in Aberystwyth As an enthusiastic amateur I do love all the minutiae of history… Continue reading THE PASSING OF ELIZABETH OF YORK – A ROYAL COINCIDENCE

The sad story of Edmund Tudor, Earl of Somerset….

I came upon the  following article in the course of trundling around on Google for royal mourning in the medieval period. It’s a very sad little story, no matter what our opinion of Henry VII. The specific fact that took me to it was that Henry wore “blue mourning robes” as he waited at Westminster… Continue reading The sad story of Edmund Tudor, Earl of Somerset….

Let’s compare Anne Neville and Elizabeth Woodville, the two queens of York . . . .

“ . . . . The role of consort can make or break a monarchy. Some have seen their reign saved by the energies of their spouse while others have seen their power waver because of their consort’s actions. Here, we look at the consorts of the House of York . . . .” Thus… Continue reading Let’s compare Anne Neville and Elizabeth Woodville, the two queens of York . . . .