The Traitor’s Arms?

In 1840 workmen carrying out repairs to St Bartholomew‚Äôs Church, Ashperton, Herefordshire were collecting stones from the ruins of a nearby manor house when they discovered a heavy stone plaque, carved with an elaborate coat of arms, among the rubble. The stone was taken to the church for safekeeping and has hung on the wall… Continue reading The Traitor’s Arms?

Who was old Hick Heavyhead then….?

  We all know that our royals have had nicknames – Longshanks, Rufus, Crouchback, Good Queen Bess, Prinny and, of course, Tricky Dicky. But HICK HEAVYHEAD????? ūüė≤ And who was it? Richard II. Apparently because he was opposed to war when his barons wanted to swarm over to France and kick seven shades out of the… Continue reading Who was old Hick Heavyhead then….?

7 things to know about the struggle between York and Lancaster….

This link¬†provides some interesting reading about the origins of the Wars of the Roses, as most people describe the civil wars between the Houses of York and Lancaster. A lot of the points are from very early on in the proceedings, which makes them all the more interesting to me.  

How and why the House of York laid claim to the throne….

Here is an article from English Historical Review, 1st June 1998, telling of how and why Richard, 3rd Duke of York, laid claim to the throne of England. The root cause was an entail to the will of Edward III, who was admittedly in his dotage at the time. The entail, which excluded a female… Continue reading How and why the House of York laid claim to the throne….

The Court of Requests and Thomas Seckford

In 1484, King Richard III created a minor equity court to deal with minor disputes in equity; these are disputes where the harshness of common law would be acknowledged by those appointed by the Crown. Equity courts were mostly seen as the Lord Chancellor’s remit, and the split of the Chancery Courts from the Curia… Continue reading The Court of Requests and Thomas Seckford

AVELINE de FORZ – AN EARLY PLANTAGENET BRIDE

Updated version of this post on Sparkypus.com Aveline de Forz an Early Plantagenet Bride – her tomb in Westminster Abbey Aveline de Forz tomb and effgy. ¬†One of the earliest tombs in Westminster Abbey. On this day, 10 November, 1274, died Aveline de Forz, Countess of Lancaster and Edmund ‘Crouchback’ Plantagenet’s first wife. ¬†Aveline was… Continue reading AVELINE de FORZ – AN EARLY PLANTAGENET BRIDE

The Abbey of the Minoresses of St Clare without Aldgate and the Ladies of the Minories

Anne Montgomery nee Darcy. ¬†One of the much respected Ladies of the Minories¬†from the window of Holy Trinity Church, Long Melford, Suffolk. Shakespeare said ‘all the world’s a stage and all the men and women merely players’. ¬†Following on from that if we may be allowed to say that the Wars of the Roses were… Continue reading The Abbey of the Minoresses of St Clare without Aldgate and the Ladies of the Minories

In suo jure (or titles that did pass through the female line)

In this post, we reminded our readers that a lineal Lancastrian is a person¬†descended from Blanche, the younger daughter of Henry¬†of Grosmont, not from her husband,¬†John of Gaunt, by another wife. Titles usually fit into these categories: i) To begin with, many older titles were created before Letters Patent in such a way that they… Continue reading In suo jure (or titles that did pass through the female line)

THE LOST PRIORY OF AMESBURY

The palatial 17thc mansion called Amesbury Abbey (now a private nursing home) stands in beautiful landscaped gardens near the curve of the Avon and on the edge of the Stonehenge World Heritage Landscape. The original monastic building from which it takes its name, the Fontrevraudine Priory of Amesbury, is long gone, a victim of Henry… Continue reading THE LOST PRIORY OF AMESBURY

Tales of a Ricardian Traveler ‚Äď Debunking a Myth at Dartington Hall

Originally posted on RICARDIAN LOONS:
Lady on Horseback, mid-15th c., British Museum Dartington Hall, near Totnes in Devon and just southeast of Dartmoor National Park, represents a uniquely British form of historical contradiction. It is both medieval, having parts of a Grade I-listed late 14th century manor house, and modern, being the current home of…