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Archive for the tag “disability”

A brave modern-day victim of scoliosis writes a book that sympathises with Richard….

Student with scoliosis

I wish Kathryn Martin all good fortune with this brave book, which is filled with her sympathy for Richard, who did not have the advantage of modern medicine and treatment to help him.

 

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An article about the Bard’s Richard III that actually acknowledges the REAL Richard….

cripping the crip

This article is very interesting, because it re-examines Shakespeare’s perverted version of Richard III. Yes, it’s about the play, and a production of it, but toward the end it deals with the REAL Richard, and how he has been damned by the Tudors and their propaganda. Well worth a read.

 

Blind and partially sighted visitors to be catered for at York attraction….

Monk Bar - picture matt clark

Monk Bar, York, home of the Richard III Experience. Picture by Matt Clark.

From the link at the end of this article:-

‘BLIND and partially sighted people will be able to appreciate some of York’s attractions better under a new scheme by York Archaeological Trust (YAT) and York Blind and Partially Sighted Society.

‘Visually impaired inspectors will visit YAT’s centres at Barley Hall, Richard III Experience in Monk Bar, Jorvik Viking Centre and DIG and report on how improvements can be made to help those with poor or no sight.

‘Jen Jackson, community engagement Manager for YAT said: “This partnership is part of our continuing commitment to be aware of the accessibility of our attractions.”

‘Caroline Robertson, outreach manager of York Blind and Partially Sighted Society said “With over 6,000 people living in York with sight loss it is important that we ensure local people can enjoy learning about their city’s past in an accessible environment.

“We are pleased to be involved in this project.” ‘

“Hey, guys, there’s something horribly wrong with my leg as well!”….

robert-sheehan

A year ago I posted on my Facebook page a link about Robert Sheehan becoming the next Shakespearean Richard III. Not knowing the actor, my only comment was that at least he was the right age to play Richard.

http://www.digitalspy.com/tv/misfits/news/a670513/robert-sheehan-doesnt-regret-leaving-misfits-early-i-was-just-a-restless-fella/#~ppnuTZvYf8bMXy

I thought no more of it, until prompted by a Facebook reminder of what I’d been up to a year ago. Curiosity set me browsing to see if there was more about Mr Sheehan’s actual performance. Opinion seems mixed, and there are a lot of reviews, so I’m providing the link to just one.

http://www.express.co.uk/entertainment/theatre/611200/review-The-Wars-Of-The-Roses-Rose-Theatre-Kingston

Most of the performers are praised,  especially the ladies, but there is some reserve about Richard himself. Not having seen the production, I cannot say one way or the other. But there are  photographs with the review, including one of Richard wearing a very strange leather-strap contraption on his right leg. It covers the leg from ankle to thigh, and to me it proclaims: “Hey, guys, as well as everything else, there’s something horribly wrong with my leg as well!”

Anyway, it would seem that Mr Sheehan’s Richard will not go down in the annals of Great Performances.

 

‘The Hollow Crown’: A Poisoned Chalice or the Ultimate Prize?

Giaconda's Blog

benedict Benedict Cumberbatch as Shakespeare’s Richard III

I am currently watching the second instalment of Shakespeare’s history plays, concerning ‘The Wars of the Roses’ as interpreted by the BBC’s condensed and somewhat, contorted adaptation.

The first part of ‘The Hollow Crown’ covered Shakespeare’s history plays: Richard II, Henry IV, Part I and II and Henry Vth.  It was, for the most part, an excellent production. A combination of strong casting, brilliant original material and interesting sets made it a joy to watch. Simon Russell Beale’s Falstaff was a triumph. He gave a mesmerizing performance which managed to capture all the facets of Falstaff’s complex character in little more than a look or a gesture.

The overwhelming sense of these plays was the great burden which kingship brought for the poor unfortunate who wore the crown. In another blog post I have written about this in detail, taking specific lines from each of…

View original post 2,891 more words

“Looking for a Straight Spine”

http://www.annettecarson.co.uk/357052370

Who really won at Bosworth? (by Katherine Newman-Warren)

I think increasingly it is Richard who has ultimately gained the greater victory. Henry won temporal power and died in his bed but Richard has gained a kind of immortality that Henry could never hope to achieve and went down fighting as a warrior king with the symbols of his kingship on his body. If a king is a symbol for his people then Richard has become, for so many, the embodiment of courage against the odds, of survival and endurance and also of human frailty and loss. As Bishop Tim said the ‘Richard’ effect touches people around the world. They are prepared to embrace him in all his flawed complexity, knowing that his choices were hard and his options limited, understanding that he was born into a bloody civil war where personal tragedies were common place and strength was often manifested in the ability to stay alive long enough to grow to manhood. People see their own struggles and setbacks in his story. They can forgive him his mistakes and bad judgements because they recognize their own faults and failings in his but they are no longer willing to swallow distortions and lies without probing these arguments for the truth which is always a rainbow of motivations and a shifting sea of morality. Our reaction to his story dares us to be wise, to understand that moral judgement from the comfort of an armchair and a place of safety is rarely justifiable and that given the same pressures we might have done worse and likely no better than he managed. They understand the enormity of his grief at the loss of his child and what crushing responsibility he shouldered alone in the last year of his life and they will continue to remember him long after the media frenzy moves on to find fresh meat. The Director of the RSC said this week that without Shakespeare Richard would have neither the notoriety nor support that he has enjoyed and in one sense I can accept this. People don’t like injustice and in the modern world, they are disgusted by prejudice based on disability. Shakespeare’s Richard is persuasive and charismatic in a way that the real Richard was perhaps not, despite his Plantagenet bloodline, but he is without regret or remorse and I don’t believe that Richard didn’t agonise over his decisions or regret his mistakes. The anxiety of his piety suggests rather the opposite and makes him real and pitiable as we all are.

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