The Franchise Affair

Josephine Tey is renowned for writing contemporary novels that refer to older mysteries. The Daughter of Time was unquestionably about an injured police Inspector learning about Richard III and the “Princes” – a device borrowed by Colin Dexter. Brat Farrar was about a missing boy who seems to reappear but whose identity is doubted, for… Continue reading The Franchise Affair

‘I saw something shining…’ Metal Detecting Finds..

The Staffordshire Hoard.  One of the biggest hoard of Anglo Saxon artefacts every discovered.  See more of this hoard below.. A story has broken of four ‘metal detectorists’ who have been convicted of stealing a hoard of Anglo-Saxon coins and jewellery worth 3 million pounds, most of which is, tragically, still missing.  You can tell from the pictures of… Continue reading ‘I saw something shining…’ Metal Detecting Finds..

The Castle of Leicester and St Mary De Castro

Leicester Castle   Since 2015 going to Leicester is the equivalent of going to visit the tomb of the last Plantagenet King who died in battle: Richard III. Everything there speaks of him from the Visitor Centre named after him, to The Last Plantagenet Pub not to mention attractions and shops that display his portrait… Continue reading The Castle of Leicester and St Mary De Castro

RAM RAIDERS REVEAL TUDOR/MEDIEVAL HOUSE

A group of ram-raiders in Dedham, Essex drove their vehicle into the facade of a plain, old Co-Op, causing considerable damage–and revealing behind the 1950’s front a timbered-framed merchant’s house built around 1520, with earlier medieval features such as a hearth and a large cauldron blocking the doorway, possibly as a talisman to ward off… Continue reading RAM RAIDERS REVEAL TUDOR/MEDIEVAL HOUSE

Murder and mayhem in medieval London…

UPDATED POST ON sparkypus.com A Medieval Potpourri https://sparkypus.com/2020/05/22/murder-and-mayhem-in-medieval-london/ Here is a link to an interesting map and article on the murder hotspots of medieval London.  Click on a dot and details pop up of that particular murder. Most of the culprits either just simply disappeared pronto or skedaddled into sanctuary and  frustratingly the outcomes are… Continue reading Murder and mayhem in medieval London…

Dick Turpin and his contemporaries

Inspired by this Kindred Spirits post, I began by reflecting on the fact that Richard (Dick) Turpin and Richard Neville, Earl of Salisbury and thus Richard III’s uncle, were both executed in York. Turpin had relatively few connections in the north, but many with Essex, from his education near Saffron Walden to his nefarious activities… Continue reading Dick Turpin and his contemporaries

Cutting Crime: The Role of Forensic Engineering Science – including the undoubted crimes perpetrated upon Richard III….

This talk on April 17, at the University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool Campus, Isaac Newton Building, Lincoln, might be interesting. Among other things, the study of Richard’s remains will be discussed. I quote: “…the talk will discuss how this adds to our insights into stabbing attacks. Finally, the audience will see how the modern forensic… Continue reading Cutting Crime: The Role of Forensic Engineering Science – including the undoubted crimes perpetrated upon Richard III….

Richard inspires best-selling author to write forensic crime thrillers….

We have all heard of Patricia Cornwell, author of numerous titles, including the Scarpetta series. Well, it seems that the discovery of Richard’s remains have inspired her to change direction from straight crime into forensic crime.  Richard’s appeal reaches out in all manner of different ways! http://www.leicestermercury.co.uk/how-did-leicester-inspire-best-selling-author-patricia-cornwell/story-29840177-detail/story.html

More useful than ever

This is the story of a triple murder in Seattle. The trial took place in 1998 and the victims were two drug dealers and their dog, Chief. The case was also featured on an episode of CBS Reality’s “Medical Detectives” that British viewers may have seen on several occasions; most recently on the early evening… Continue reading More useful than ever

“There was a man …

… his name was Rouse. He had the key to every house. He was suspected and then arrested …” (https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwjU_ZWEjZvKAhUJ1h4KHfbYBp0QFgggMAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fopus.lingfil.uu.se%2FOpenSubtitles2012%2Fxml%2Fen%2F2005%2F20551%2F3099498_1of1.xml.gz&usg=AFQjCNF57cSMby7R2qZUHshq9kvRA28kXA&sig2=RZ7d8jSa-bulSdyeXFoUYg) Alfred Arthur Rouse (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_Rouse) was an ostensibly happily married commercial traveller, to Lily May Watkins, when in London. In other regions, he was a bachelor or occasionally “married” to a different woman. To end his… Continue reading “There was a man …