The origins of Marshalsea courts and prisons….

While trawling around looking for information about Marshalsea courts in the time of Richard II, I came upon this WordPress blog (by Mercedes Rochelle) that covers the subject.  I quote the article in full:- “Today when we hear about the Marshalsea we think of the infamous 19th century Southwark prison with all its associated tortures.… Continue reading The origins of Marshalsea courts and prisons….

The Swynford/ Beaufort case again

As we said five years ago, it is unclear whether John, Marquess of Somerset and Dorset, really was the son of John of Gaunt or of Sir Hugh Swynford. Furthermore, the common law answer to that question may be different to the genetic answer, as we revealed that Swynford could well have died after the… Continue reading The Swynford/ Beaufort case again

Insanity through the ages

Insanity was recognised under English law in the Norman era thus: “eo quod sensu carent et ratione, non magis quam brutum animal iniuriam facere possunt nec feloniam, cum non multum distent a brutis, secundum quod videri poterit in minore, qui si alium interficeret in minori ætate, iudicium non sustineret.” (“since they are without sense and… Continue reading Insanity through the ages