Richard’s silver boar only makes it to Number Two 🤨….!

  Richard’s silver boar badge makes it to number two on this list, second only to a golden aestel of a horse’s head, which is believed to be part of a pointer for reading books. The boar should be first, of course. No question. But I don’t think we need to be told it’s a… Continue reading Richard’s silver boar only makes it to Number Two 🤨….!

Thetford

Here are the remains of Thetford’s magnificent Cluniac Priory, built in 1107 and the burial place of the Mowbrays and Howards up to 1540, when they were moved to St. Michael’s, Framlingham. Only about five minutes’ walk from the station, it is best visited on a dry day because Cromwell’s commissioners were ruthless and so,… Continue reading Thetford

Henry VII…er…Henry of Windsor, and his badges….

The following excerpt, concerning royal badges, is from here: “. . .Richard I, John, and Henry III. are all said to have used the device of the crescent and star (Fig. 680). Henry VII. is best known by his two badges of the crowned portcullis and the “sun-burst” (Fig. 681). The suggested origin of the… Continue reading Henry VII…er…Henry of Windsor, and his badges….

The Bedingfield turncoat of Oxburgh Hall….

In this 2014 post mention was made of Sir Edmund Bedingfield of Oxburgh Hall, near King’s Lynn in Norfolk. He was a Yorkist-turned-Tudor supporter who, like the Stanleys and others, failed Richard III at Bosworth. Sir Edmund was a Yorkist who benefited under Edward IV and Richard III (at the coronation of the latter, he was… Continue reading The Bedingfield turncoat of Oxburgh Hall….

The real site of the Battle of Barnet…?

The excellent BBC series Digging for Britain, Series 5, the episode concerning the east of Britain, presented by the equally excellent Dr Alice Roberts, contained a section on the Battle of Barnet, 1471. Why is it that an accepted site for a battle so often proves to be the wrong one? Bosworth is a prime… Continue reading The real site of the Battle of Barnet…?

The saga of how I eventually acquired The Complete Armory by Sir Bernard Burke….

The above illustration is actually of Sir Bernard Burke dressed as Ulster King of Arms for a fancy dress ‘do’, but he really was Ulster King of Arms! I recently posted about Anne Neville sharing a white boar badge with Richard, see this post , although hers was muzzled and chained. Or so is claimed… Continue reading The saga of how I eventually acquired The Complete Armory by Sir Bernard Burke….

Richard III: Their part in his rediscovery

  We all know that Richard III was identified by his mitochondrial DNA and that DNA was discovered in Cambridge. The discovery was announced at the “Eagle” pub in the city. It is less well known that this name is derived from the Stanley badge, the “Eagle and Child” , although it ought, perhaps, have been the… Continue reading Richard III: Their part in his rediscovery

Anne Neville was a boar too….

We always hear about the badges of medieval families, e.g. Richard III’s white boar, the Warwick bear and ragged staff, the Stafford knot, Richard II’s white hart and so on and so on, but what about the ladies? Maybe they didn’t ride into battle with the banners streaming (well, there were some notable exceptions, of… Continue reading Anne Neville was a boar too….