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A corkscrew made from bits of Old London Bridge….

London Bridge corkscrew

In 2014, a broken Victorian corkscrew made from pieces of old London Bridge was bought for £40,000 at an auction in Essex, over 100 times its asking price. See this article/, from which the following is taken:-

“The corkscrew, the components of which are thought to be up to 800 years old, was bought by an “anonymous European collector” at the sale in Colchester.

“Sold by Reeman Dansie Auctioneers (which last year old a collection of photographs showing German pilots from WWI drinking champagne) the corkscrew had an asking price of just £400 – £600.

“John Benson, the auctioneer at the sale, said the bid “caught us all unawares” and apparently there was a round of applause when the gavel came down.

“Engraved with the words: “”Made from the Iron Shoe that was taken from a pillar. That was 656 Years in the Foundation of Old London Bridge,” the corkscrew was made by Ovenston of 72 Great Titchfield Street in London.

London Bridge - The new bridge was built 180 feet west of the old Bridge and for a time Londoners could see both the old bridge and the new side-by-side.

The new bridge was built 180 feet west of the old bridge and for a time Londoners could see both the old bridge and the new side-by-side.

“However, despite being in relatively good condition the corkscrew does not work properly, the catalogue explaining that the “ratchet does not engage with the spring”.

“Old London Bridge was built between 1176 and the early 13th century, paid for with a tax on wool imposed by King Henry II (when England was the centre of the European wool trade), famously covered in houses and shops (see below) it was torn down in 1831 when new London Bridge was opened (and which now resides in Havasu City, Arizona).

“The current London Bridge is at least the fourth incarnation of the famous span and was built between 1967 and 1972, opening in March 1973.”

London Bridge - toward the end

London Bridge toward the end

 

 

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ANYONE GOT SOME SPARE CASH??? Rare Ricardian Item Up For Auction

I happened to find this little beauty on the internet.  If I was lucky renough to  win the lottery,  it would be  mine, all mine!

This is what the information in the article says  about it:

MEDIEVAL DIE WITH HERALDIC ‘RICHARD III BOAR’ IN FOLIAGE
15th century ADA cast bronze rectangular die with deeply incuse engraved designs set in six panels, the centre depicting a standing heraldic boar facing to the left as viewed, surrounded by floral sprays and rose blooms with a series of waves below, set within a rectangular border having indented lower corners; in addition with a narrow rectangular panel above enclosing a long floral spray running left to right as viewed, curved spandrels at lower corners with further floral sprays and thin upright panels at the sides, again depicting floral sprays; the edges lined out and the panel borders of pellets set between parallel lines; the reverse of the piece with earlier Black Letter lowercase incuse and reversed inscription reading ‘peines’ for paines/punishment?.

 

boar auction

 

boar

It is startling to realise how many  rarities are out there, perhaps unrecognised by the owners. Many many more turn up and aid our understanding of Richard’s brief rein.

And maybe one time, I’ll have enough £££ to buy one for myself… Estimated value on this beautiful piece is £2000-£3000. I’ll be watching the results with interest.

 

The accounts for the Duchy of Cornwall, ordered by Richard III in June 1483….

1483 duchy of cornwall accounts

“The accounts for the Duchy of Cornwall for 1483 – a momentous year in English history – are to be sold at Bonhams Fine Books and Manuscripts Sale in London on 21 March. They are estimated at £4,000-6,000.

“The records were taken to Bonhams offices in Exeter for valuation, having been bought as part of a job lot at a local auction in Devon. They were drawn up on the orders of Richard III who came to the English throne in June 1483. His brother Edward IV had died earlier that year, and Richard had been appointed Protector to his 12 year old nephew, who succeeded his father as Edward V.  When Edward V was denounced as the product of an unlawful marriage, he was stripped of the crown and Richard declared the legitimate king in his place.  Edward and his brother Richard were imprisoned in the Tower of London, where they were later famously murdered, traditionally on the orders of Richard III.”*

“The Duchy of Cornwall was created by Edward III in 1337, specifically to produce an income for the heir to the throne.  It covered, and still covers, areas outside Cornwall -mainly in Devon, including Plympton, Tavistock and Exeter. The accounts for sale are for the period Michaelmas, 22nd year of Edward IV’s reign to Michaelmas, the first year of Richard III’s year i.e. 29 September 1482-29 September 1483. During this time, the position of Duke of Cornwall was held by the future Edward V, and then by Richard III’s son Edward (who died the following year at the age of 10).”

“The records are highly detailed, showing totals for rents, sales and court receipts for each manor within the Duchy, with the names of the bailiffs or reeves. The receipts for tin mines were particularly valuable.  By this period, the profits from the Duchy were worth around £500 a year. By contrast, the annual average wage of a labourer was then about £2.00.

“Bonhams valuer in Exeter, Sam Tuke, said, ‘It is always exciting to come across something so special. The accounts are particularly interesting because they include details of properties in Devon as well as in Cornwall itself. They are of course, written in mediaeval Latin, but our specialists were able to decipher the text, and reveal their true value.’”

* Traditionally usually means “according to Tudor propaganda” and should not be believed in this case. It is not known what happened to the boys in the Tower, but to lay the blame solely at Richard III’s feet is naïve. If he was in the business of murdering his brothers’ children, there were many others he would have disposed of as well. On the other hand, there were people who would have benefited from the boys’ deaths, including Henry VII, Margaret Beaufort and the Duke of Buckingham. Henry certainly didn’t want them around when he had to make Elizabeth of York legitimate in order to marry her. So forget Richard in this matter, and look to his enemies.

 

Postscript: Here is a link to a further article about these accounts. It contains much more information about the discovery. Just look away when you reach that word “hunchback”!

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/02/27/medieval-accounts-richard-iiis-rule-found-among-job-lot-1930s/

 

Another of Richard’s half-angels found….

DNW-Richard-III-Half-Angel-2

Gold half-angels are scarce enough, but those from Richard’s brief reign are truly rare. Now one has been found in a field close to Bosworth, and is to be auctioned. It joins the exceedingly slender ranks of those previously discovered.

To read the whole story of its unearthing, click here:

See also: https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/news/fleeing-army-may-have-dropped-richard-iii-gold-coin-h8fwxqbsc

http://www.rugbyadvertiser.co.uk/news/rare-gold-coin-found-in-field-near-rugby-expected-to-sell-for-up-to-15-000-at-auction-1-8250201

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-5092541/500-year-old-coin-amateur-treasure-hunter.html

Postscript: Since writing the above article, the coin has been sold for the huge sum of £40,000! An association with Richard III certainly carries some clout.

A numismatic error

 

You have heard of badly minted coins or those prepared for a monarch who doesn’t reign for much longer but these Henry III gold pennies were worth more as bullion than currency.

Of the eight that are known to remain in existence , one of them will be auctioned in the new year

More old coins found, including one of HVII’s….

more coins

Just how many more ancient coins are waiting for someone to find them? And how many hoards? It never ceases to be exciting.

There is a date of 1504 for at least one of these, so I guess we know who hid them! Step forward Henry VII, and admit it’s one of your stashes. If you’d lost a coin, you’d have had the entire county dug up until it was found!

 

A Tale of Two Medieval Rings

 

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The two gold rings, thought to be about 600 years old

An interesting article about two beautiful gold medieval rings caught my eye.  The article explains how the rings, thought to be about 600 years old were found in a field in Dorset.  The larger one would have been worn over a glove while the smaller one, which features a letter R which was probably the initial of the owner,  was worn on the same finger but under the glove.    When they were found the small one was still  inside the larger one, the glove and remains of the owner having rotted away.

450ED66900000578-4951338-image-a-92_1507197592924.jpg

The small ring, worn directly on the finger

450ED66D00000578-4951338-image-a-93_1507197593211.jpg

The larger ring which would have been worn over a glove

My initial thought was how lucky someone was to be able to afford such beautiful treasure.  However as I read more of the article my second thought was what  on earth had gone one here? What fate had befallen the owner of these rings?   They must have died wearing the glove?  Or was this the remains of a burial that had maybe been exhumed from a nearby church (similar to the remains of Henry Vlll’s last wife Katherine Parr, whose remains had turned up in a field too).   Had the owner perhaps been murdered?  Maybe he had an accident while on a journey and his body lay undiscovered.  What scenario could it have been where the rings would not have been stolen or looted?  We will never know of course.  The truth will remain hidden.  But I’m pretty sure these rings would have quite a story to tell if only they could speak..and that story would be dark.

The latest on the hunt for Richard’s Y-chromosome

Lionel of Antwerp, Duke of Clarence, was born today in 1338, although he died just before his thirtieth birthday. He is, of course, a mixed-line direct ancestor of Richard III but he is the brother of Edmund of Langley, Richard’s male-line great grandfather.

Here, John Ashdown-Hill spoke to Nerdalicious about his attempts to locate Lionel and secure a little DNA. You may compare it with our earlier piece about a similar search.

Fancy a Richard III coin in your collection…?

Richard coin

Richard’s coins are, inevitably, rare. He didn’t reign long enough for there to be all that many. However, one of his “long cross pennies” is up for auction, and can be viewed from noon, Monday, 4th September 2017, at the Emmanuel Centre, 9-23 Marsham Street, Westminster, London SW1P 3DW.

Cheque books and plastic at the ready, ladies and gentlemen? At the very least, scuttle along there and take a peek.

 

Richard as a toby jug….!

Toby Jugs

Toby jugs

I love toby jugs. My grandmother had a lot of them, in all sizes. They were proper toby jugs, of course, in three-corner hats and 18th-century clothing. In fact, everyone seemed to have at least one of them when I was growing up. Every mantelpiece sported a rotund toby.

Now, of course, toby jugs aren’t as common, nor are they dressed in three-cornered hats. These days you can even get Richard III toby jugs. Well, they’ve been around some time, of course, and as all sorts of other figures.

I don’t think I fancy Shylock lurking on my mantelpiece, but Richard can sit there any time he wants!

See here and here.

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