Ashby de la Zouch Castle – Home to William Lord Hastings

Reblogged from Ashby de la Zouch Castle – Home to William Lord Hastings An intriguing doorway leads into the Great Chamber where the family would have entertained important guests.  A fine 15th century fireplace has survived as well as a 16th century window.  Photo from the English Heritage Guidebook book Following on from my earlier post… Continue reading Ashby de la Zouch Castle – Home to William Lord Hastings

Elizabeth Woodville was queen in her own right….?

According to this article (titled Vic Keegan’s Lost London 111: Elizabeth Woodville’s Westminster Abbey sanctuary) Elizabeth Woodville was “queen in her own right”. I think not. She was queen because she married King Edward IV. She was his consort. Well, perhaps that too should be qualified, because Edward appears to have been careless enough to… Continue reading Elizabeth Woodville was queen in her own right….?

PERKIN WARBECK AND THE ASSAULTS ON THE GATES OF EXETER

Reblogged from A Medieval Potpourri sparkypus.com This is thought to be a portrait of Perkin Warbeck/Richard Duke of York from the Tournament Tapestry at Valenciennes Perkin Warbeck.  Pencil sketch c1560.  Note the eye blemish in both portraits. Following on from my earlier post and the high likelihood that John Evans ,who lies buried in Coldridge Church Devon,  was… Continue reading PERKIN WARBECK AND THE ASSAULTS ON THE GATES OF EXETER

Walking “Tudor” England

Suzannah Lipscomb has just completed another series on Channel Five, this time visiting the sites related to the “Tudors”. In the first episode, she concentrated on Henry VIII and the naval power he inherited from John Howard, Duke of Norfolk. The second was principally about the penultimate “Tudor”, Mary I, as well as Edward VI… Continue reading Walking “Tudor” England

The history of Henry Fitzroy, Duke of Richmond and Somerset….

This interesting, very readable article is about Henry VIII’s illegitimate son Henry Fitzroy, Duke of Richmond and Somerset. It’s interesting and very readable, and definitely not anti-Richard III, mostly the opposite in fact. But it doesn’t spare Henrys VII and VIII. I enjoyed reading it in spite of a few bloopers that are nevertheless not… Continue reading The history of Henry Fitzroy, Duke of Richmond and Somerset….

THE STONOR PAPERS, LOVE LETTERS THEREIN..

Reblogged from A Medieval Potpourri sparkypus.com Being of somewhat a silly old romantic I was pleasantly surprised to read in the blurb of Kingsford’s Stonor Letter and Papers 1290-1483 that there were love letters to be found among them. And what could possibly be nicer than a medieval love letter? And there they were, letters from… Continue reading THE STONOR PAPERS, LOVE LETTERS THEREIN..

Richard only became king because of the Council of the North. Got it….?

Something caught my attention in this article about the role York has played in our history. Here is the relevant extract:- “….In 1405, the Percys seriously proposed to create a separate Northern kingdom forever. The Wars of the Roses was at heart all about that divide. Richard III became king only because he had his… Continue reading Richard only became king because of the Council of the North. Got it….?

THE TRIAL OF RICHARD III, PART 1

REBLOGGED FROM A MEDIEVAL POTPOURRI SPARKYPUS.COM The statue of Justice, Old Bailey, London. Way back in  1980 the late Jeremy Potter,  Chairman of the Richard III Society,  and producer Richard Drewitt discussed King Richard III at length and an idea was born.    That was to put Richard  on trial for a heinous murder he had… Continue reading THE TRIAL OF RICHARD III, PART 1

GEORGE DUKE OF CLARENCE, ISOBEL NEVILLE AND THE CLARENCE VAULT

  Reblogged from A Medieval Potpourri sparkpus.com GEORGE DUKE OF CLARENCE, ISOBEL NEVILLE AND THE CLARENCE VAULT   This is thought to be a portrait of Isobel from the Luton Guild Book.  See  The Dragonhound’s  interesting post here After the death of Isobel Duchess of Clarence on the 22 December 1476 aged 25, her coffin lay in… Continue reading GEORGE DUKE OF CLARENCE, ISOBEL NEVILLE AND THE CLARENCE VAULT

The Traitor’s Arms?

In 1840 workmen carrying out repairs to St Bartholomew’s Church, Ashperton, Herefordshire were collecting stones from the ruins of a nearby manor house when they discovered a heavy stone plaque, carved with an elaborate coat of arms, among the rubble. The stone was taken to the church for safekeeping and has hung on the wall… Continue reading The Traitor’s Arms?