Ewelme Manor, Henry VII and what the manor house may have looked like….

“….Henry VII, doubtless after having taken good stock of the amenities of Ewelme Manor, during his self-proposed visit to Edmund de la Pole before the latter’s banishment, decided that it would be well-fitted for a country retreat, later on to be converted into a Royal Palace. In fact, it may have become to the King… Continue reading Ewelme Manor, Henry VII and what the manor house may have looked like….

London’s Greatest Bridges (continued)

This series finally resumed on Channel Five at the beginning of October, to cover two of the newer structures over the Thames, neither of which are in the original form. As usual, Rob Bell’s enthusiasm is infectious and his programmes are highly informative. Episode Three covered Westminster Bridge. By 1700, the population of London was… Continue reading London’s Greatest Bridges (continued)

A Medieval Almshouse–with a Hidden Treasure

Sherborne is a pretty little town with a ruined castle, interesting buildings including, an abbey, and a medieval almshouse. All are well worth a visit but the 15th century almshouse is of particular note as it is still in use in its original function. As the buildings are  residential, the Almshouse is not generally open… Continue reading A Medieval Almshouse–with a Hidden Treasure

The Bishop of Lincoln’s country residence….

Let’s be honest, the more senior churchmen (bishops and above) have always known how to live well. For centuries they have enjoyed elegant surroundings. . .and have lacked for nothing. The subject of this article is 15th-century Lyddington Palace, home of the Bishops of Lincoln, such as this one. “By 1600, a lot of the palace… Continue reading The Bishop of Lincoln’s country residence….

The Kingmaker’s almshouses….

When looking into the history of Burford in Oxfordshire, I came upon this site. One wonders if the great Richard Neville, born 22nd November 1428, ever actually saw the result of his charity. “The most conspicuous charitable act in late medieval Burford was the foundation in 1455–6 of the Great Almshouse (or Warwick Almshouses) near the church,… Continue reading The Kingmaker’s almshouses….