What if Lullingstone’s royal visitor of the past were still in residence….?

The south wing of Lullingstone Castle in Kent is up for sale, as you can see in this article This is how I’ve learned that none other than Henry VII was once a regular visitor. Oh, ye gods. Imagine being a modern-day visitor who has get up on a winter’s night to look for the… Continue reading What if Lullingstone’s royal visitor of the past were still in residence….?

Michael Portillo’s Great Coastal Railway Journeys and Pembroke Castle

  I have enjoyed watching Michael Portillo’s Great Railway Journeys particularly the programmes that have shown him travelling along the coast of South Wales. He stopped off in places that I know well in Glamorgan, also in places that my ancestors hailed from in Carmarthenshire. However, one programme ended up in Pembroke and I must… Continue reading Michael Portillo’s Great Coastal Railway Journeys and Pembroke Castle

From butterfly wings to the astonishing accuracy of medieval maps….

“….Where and how did medieval mapmakers, apparently armed with no more than a compass, an hourglass and sets of sailing directions, develop stunningly accurate maps of southern Europe, the Black Sea and North African coastlines, as if they were looking down from a satellite, when no one had been higher than a treetop?…” I have… Continue reading From butterfly wings to the astonishing accuracy of medieval maps….

A winter walk that ends at Middleham….

“….In tonight’s episode, Kate Bottley, a part-time Church of England priest from Sheffield, will take a historic hike through the ruins and snow-covered landscape of Wensleydale and Coverdale. As she sets off on her winter walk, the sun rises over the ruins of Jervaulx Abbey and with just a 360-degree camera in her hand, Kate walks along the banks… Continue reading A winter walk that ends at Middleham….

A universal truth: Richard III was a very respectable man….

Here is an amusing read in the Horrible Histories vein…well, its title tells that much. Richard III gets a mention. It seems Jane Austen questioned “…’whether Richard III really did kill his nephews, writing: he was a York [and] I am inclined to suppose him a very respectable man’…” But yes, it’s a send-up. Heaven… Continue reading A universal truth: Richard III was a very respectable man….

London Bridge and Its Houses c.1209-1761 by Dorian Gerhold – a review.

Reblogged from A Medieval Potpourri @ sparkypus.com A view of the bridge  from Southwark, c.1630.  Note the houses that are standing to the south of the Stone Gate, shown here adorned with heads on pikes, were in fact on the first pier of the bridge.  This is one of the few remaining pictures showing the city… Continue reading London Bridge and Its Houses c.1209-1761 by Dorian Gerhold – a review.

Find the Roman roads of Britain….

Finding the Roman roads of England and Wales can be tricky, but now there’s a “London Underground” map that identifies them all. Well, not quite, but mostly. On discovering this site I went immediately to find Stone Street in Kent…but it’s marked as unnamed. Stone Street is definitely a Roman road. It’s still there and… Continue reading Find the Roman roads of Britain….

A convict’s skull found by the Thames after 200 years….

This article may not be our period exactly, but it’s another example of the things that continually turn up on the Thames foreshore. Mind you, I fail to see how it can be stated with any conviction (sorry!) that the skull is that of a convict “thrown off [a] prison ship” 200 years ago in… Continue reading A convict’s skull found by the Thames after 200 years….

Pristine Roman road discovered in Kent cellar….

Well, discovering treasures from the past doesn’t always take the form of buried hoards or items of priceless jewellery. Now a father and son who bought a shop in Rochester, Kent, were excavating in the cellar and found the above section of Roman road. It’s absolutely pristine. You can read about it and see more… Continue reading Pristine Roman road discovered in Kent cellar….

Songs about Devon

Here we have another album from the Legendary Ten Seconds, featuring songs about Richard III’s visit to Exeter and “Perkin“‘s attempt to enter the city, as well as several later events. Here are the words to King Richard’s Visit and At the Gates of Exeter, which can be played here and here.