Diana Rubino on the Legendary Ten Seconds

As you will observe from their appearance on Diana Rubino’s blog , The Legendary Ten Seconds now have a book featuring information on some of their best-known songs about Richard III, his time and Devon, of course. My Review of The Legendary Ten Seconds for the Ricardian Register (magazine of the American branch) As a longtime… Continue reading Diana Rubino on the Legendary Ten Seconds

Not what you expect with a water bill!

I also received this from Anglia Water about the “Rutland Sea Dragon”, an ichtyosaur found near Rutland Water. It featured in episode four of Digging for Britain, the latest series of which was shown over two weeks in January. As ever, Alice Roberts was the main presenter, alongside Dr. Onyeka Nubia and Dr. Cat Jarman.… Continue reading Not what you expect with a water bill!

Michael Portillo’s Great Coastal Railway Journeys and Pembroke Castle

  I have enjoyed watching Michael Portillo’s Great Railway Journeys particularly the programmes that have shown him travelling along the coast of South Wales. He stopped off in places that I know well in Glamorgan, also in places that my ancestors hailed from in Carmarthenshire. However, one programme ended up in Pembroke and I must… Continue reading Michael Portillo’s Great Coastal Railway Journeys and Pembroke Castle

From butterfly wings to the astonishing accuracy of medieval maps….

“….Where and how did medieval mapmakers, apparently armed with no more than a compass, an hourglass and sets of sailing directions, develop stunningly accurate maps of southern Europe, the Black Sea and North African coastlines, as if they were looking down from a satellite, when no one had been higher than a treetop?…” I have… Continue reading From butterfly wings to the astonishing accuracy of medieval maps….

A fully-functioning iron hand from the early 16th century….

  We’re inclined to view fully functioning prosthetic hands and so on as a modern invention. The fruits of our ever-advancing society. But we aren’t the originators. Of course, prosthetics go back a very long time, e.g. a wooden toe survives from Ancient Egypt, but the fully functioning part also goes back a fair way.… Continue reading A fully-functioning iron hand from the early 16th century….

Dogs and the Dog Days….

    Like most other people, I once thought that Dog Days did indeed have something to do with dogs. I eventually learned that no, they acquired their name from Sirius, the Dog Star, which is at its brightest during certain weeks in summer. The Ancient Greeks (some sites credit the Romans, so you can… Continue reading Dogs and the Dog Days….

Richard III’s boar badge found at Chiddingly manor house in 1999….

  “….in 1999 a metal detectorist made an extraordinary find that’s become known as the Chiddingly Boar: ‘The white boar badge was used by Richard III’s household and followers between 1472 and 1485,’ the British Museum explain on their website of the hat badge that is now in their collection….” “….The boar was Richard’s symbol, and thousands… Continue reading Richard III’s boar badge found at Chiddingly manor house in 1999….

Did a volcanic eruption somewhere in the world affect England in 1391….?

  Huge volcanic eruptions have always affected parts of the world that are often far, far away from the centre of the event. A famous (to me) example of this was in 1815 with Mount Tambora (in what is now Indonesia) which created such clouds and darkness that it made 1816 “the Year Without a… Continue reading Did a volcanic eruption somewhere in the world affect England in 1391….?

Yet another erroneous Tudor boast….!

  Once again it seems the Tudors claim to have invented something that had been around for over a century before Old Misery Guts stole the throne. To wit, mince pies. Well, the Tudors would, wouldn’t they? They couldn’t bear ANYTHING to have been around before they were. Typically insecure rear-ends. Anyway, these kuskenoles look… Continue reading Yet another erroneous Tudor boast….!

Book Review: How to Survive in Medieval England by Toni Mount

This useful guide is a vital accessory when you next visit the Middle Ages. How will you manage without your mobile phone, internet or social media? When transport means walking or, for the better off, horse-back, how will you know where you are or where to go? Where will you live and what should you… Continue reading Book Review: How to Survive in Medieval England by Toni Mount