The ghost of Archbishop Sudbury….

1381, the Peasants’ Revolt. Ah yes, it trips as easily off the tongue as 1066 and 1485. Well, there are other outstanding dates too, of course, but I’ll stick with these three as times of huge upheaval in England’s history. Not necessary for the better either, especially in the case of 1485. Simon Sudbury was… Continue reading The ghost of Archbishop Sudbury….

Were Richard of Gloucester and Lady Anne Neville married in this church….?

An article  about the end of stamp duty on some properties, included a smaller column from which I’ve taken the following: “….A six-bedroom family home [in Stanford-in-the-Vale] linked to Richard III sold for £2.65million after spending just three weeks on the market….[it] was once owned by Anne Neville, who was Queen Consort to Richard III….”… Continue reading Were Richard of Gloucester and Lady Anne Neville married in this church….?

Did Amy Robsart fall or was she pushed….?

  Not our period, but Amy Robsart’s  is a story that has always fascinated me. Did she fall, or was she pushed…? I think we all have our theories. I believe Dudley was behind it and shot himself in the foot, so to speak, because Elizabeth took fright. She already knew she was playing with… Continue reading Did Amy Robsart fall or was she pushed….?

It’s 1773, and Richard III is King of Great Britain….!

  Could someone tell me how a document from 1773 could be signed by “King Richard III of Great Britain”? I rather think it’s a goof for George III. Richard didn’t know about Great Britain (George III had England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales—oh, and Hanover, Richard didn’t have Scotland or Hanover, but claimed France), So… Continue reading It’s 1773, and Richard III is King of Great Britain….!

A modern parallel

The Three Estates offered Richard, Duke of Gloucester, the crown when his brother’s bigamy was exposed, thereby bastardising his sons. Something very similar happened as recently as 1997, although there was DNA involved and not a bishop. Anthony, 3rd Baron Moynihan, died in Manila during 1991, after an eventful life that had included five marriages,… Continue reading A modern parallel

MPs who want to quit can apply to be Crown Steward and Bailiff of the Manor of Northstead….

“….MPs wishing to quit can apply to be ‘Crown Steward and Bailiff of the Chiltern Hundreds’ or ‘Crown Steward and Bailiff of the Manor of Northstead’. Neither job has existed for centuries but the ‘jobs’ still exist as a workaround to the law of 1624….” Well, I’d heard of the Chiltern Hundreds, but have to… Continue reading MPs who want to quit can apply to be Crown Steward and Bailiff of the Manor of Northstead….

Sir Bevis Bulmer – son of Smithfield

Bevis Bulmer certainly didn’t have a good start in life. He was about one when his parents were executed for high treason on the same day in May 1537, having been caught up in the Pilgrimage of Grace. Sir John, from a prominent Yorkshire family, was hanged and beheaded whilst Margaret, his mother who may… Continue reading Sir Bevis Bulmer – son of Smithfield

Piracy, then and now

It has been brought to our attention that a website, probably based in Eastern Europe, has uploaded several hundred recently published history books and made them available without charge or password, ostensibly as an educational project. Whilst we won’t mention the site in question, to avoid encouraging them, here is a reminder of the typical… Continue reading Piracy, then and now

She also married in secret …

… and, to add to Louis XIV, King Fahd of Saudi Arabia, Andre Previn, Ed Sheeran and Princess Beatrice, we can now add the singer Adele to the list – she appears to have married in 2016 but divorced in 2019. In Cairo, they will still maintain that Edward IV married in secret in 1464,… Continue reading She also married in secret …

A few years ago …

… we showed you, through the use of snooker balls, how it is significantly more probable that the Y-chromosome break occurred in the long Gaunt-Beaufort male line than the Langley-York line to Richard III.Although snooker was a nineteenth century invention, some earlier monarchs might well have enjoyed it: Harold II, whose informal wife (in more… Continue reading A few years ago …