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Forthcoming events

Philippa Langley - 2012

“A PANEL of experts on the medieval era will gather in Teesdale for a study day next month.

“St Mary’s Parish Church, in Barnard Castle, will play host to the all-day event held by the Northern Dales Richard III Group on Saturday, October 14.

“Headed by Juliet Barker, a renowned author on medieval English tournaments and chivalry will be deliver a talk titles Knights in Shining Armour. Philippa Langley MBE, whose Looking for Richard project led to the rediscovery of Richard III’s remains in 2012, will be bringing the latest news of her project to uncover the truth about the King of England’s nephews and their disappearance.

“Dr Sandra Pendlington will explore the little-known Anglo-Scottish War of 1480-82 while Dr Katherine Wilson, of Chester University, will reveal the luxuries and stylistic trappings of continental royalty. Kim Harding, group chair, said: ‘We’re thrilled to welcome such prestigious speakers this year on medieval topics that can appeal to anyone, fascinated by history or by art or by the intriguing mysteries of Richard III’s life and reign.'”

For details and to book tickets call 01833-637018 and see here.

I am informed by my good friend Judy Thomson that for those who live in the US, there will be a similar event next spring – the 53rd International Congress on Medieval Studies, which will take place on the campus of Western Michigan University on May 10 to 13, 2018. The Congress program and registration will be available in February. See here.

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Unlocking the secrets of the Black Prince’s effigy

Unlocking the secrets of the Black Prince’s effigy

A team of scientists and art historians has been attempting to unravel some of the mysteries surrounding the Black Prince’s tomb. In this short video you can find out what they were up to and what they are hoping to discover.

This investigation is one of a number of research papers and talks that are being prepared for The Black Prince: Man, Mortality & Myth conference on 16 and 17 November 2017. You can find out more about the conference here: https://www.canterbury-cathedral.org/whats-on/event/blackprinceconference/

There will also be a free #YoungFutures conference in the build up to the event for 16-25 year olds. For more information visit: https://www.canterbury-cathedral.org/whats-on/event/youngfutures2017/

#BlackPrince

Canterbury

Portraiture – including Richard – at Redgrave church’s latest history workshop….

Redgrave church

St Mary’s Church at Redgrave is hosting the event, called ‘People Power’, on September 30 from 10.30am-4pm, which will be led by lecturer Tania Harrington. 

June Shepherd, workshop organiser, said it would be the latest in a popular series of study days the church has run since 2007, covering everything from Richard III to First World War airmail.

She said: “From the start our team aimed at providing history lovers with something more meaty than an evening lecture, yet not as involving as a several-month course.

“An added interest is that the study days all take place inside a beautiful building which is itself historically important.”

Cost is £18, including a light lunch. To book, send SAE to Mrs J. Shepherd, Barn View, Chapel Lane, Botesdale IP22 1DT, with cheques made out to Redgrave Church Heritage Trust. 

http://www.edp24.co.uk/going-out/portraiture-to-come-into-focus-at-redgrave-church-s-latest-history-workshop-featuring-tania-harrington-1-5190789

 

Richard III and a hansom cab….?

Atkins Building

The following is taken from the site to which there is a link below. I am posting it because among the exhibits will be items concerning Richard III and Bosworth:-

The iconic Hansom Cab will return to its ‘hometown’ as part of the National Heritage Open Days celebration.

The two-passenger horse-drawn carriage will be back in action on Saturday September 9 with town dignitaries being taken for a spin and the public invited to admire its restored splendour.

Developed and tested by Joseph Hansom in Hinckley and patented in 1834, the Hansom cab went on to become one of the most popular forms of transport during the 1800s.

hansom cab

This example, which once graced the entrance to the Hinckley Island Hotel, has been fully restored and remains in the custody of the restorer until a suitable site to house it can be found in the town.

Long-term plans are likely to see it put on show at Hinckley and District Museum but fundraising to create an extension to accommodate it needs to be completed first.

The cab is not the only historical attraction to command attention on the day. Several listed buildings not usually operating a full-time ‘open door’ policy will be available for the public to tour.

These include the Atkins Building, Hinckley and District Museum, Hinckley Great Meeting Unitarian Chapel, St Peter’s Church in Thornton as well as the Hinckley Masonic Hall.

A special history display will be mounted in Hinckley Market Place, with information from the Hinckley and Bosworth Borough Council, local history group Hinckley District Past and Present and also historian Greg Drozdz. Greg will also be leading a walk dedicated to Hinckley’s literary heritage.

The celebration also coincides with the 50th anniversary of conservation areas and a special display will be held within the Market Place.

Borough Councillor Stan Rooney, said: “Having a Hansom cab return to the streets of Hinckley will be a wonderful sight and showcase the heritage that this town has to offer.

“The Hansom cab is an asset to the town and long may we continue to celebrate the fact it was developed here. I am very excited to see the cab in action.”

Hinckley Masonic Hall on St Mary’s Road, will be open on Saturday September 9 from 10am to 3pm to allow visitors access to the Masonic Lodge rooms and lean about the 300th anniversary of Freemasonry and the history of the Hinckley lodges.

Greg Drozdz’s literary themed walk takes place at 2.30pm on Saturday September 9.

Grade I-listed medieval church, St Peter’s at Thornton will be open from 10am to 6pm on Saturday September 9 and from 1pm to 5pm on Sunday September 10.

The museum, Atkins Building and Unitarian Chapel form the focus of a guided walk which starts at 10.30am on Saturday September 9.

Beginning at the museum on Lower Bond Street the tour moves across the road to what was once one of the largest hosiery factories in the world then turns up Baines Lane to visit the Great Meeting Chapel with its links to the Atkins family revealed.

Refreshments will be available at all three venues. The Atkins Building offers full wheelchair access and there is partial wheelchair access available at the other two sites. To book a place email info@atkinsbuilding.co.uk or call Hinckley 247070.

■ For further heritage insight Hinckley and District Museum will be free to visitors on Friday and Saturday September 8 and 9 from 10am to 4pm and Sunday September 10 from 2pm to 5pm.

The thatched former frame-work knitters cottages date from the 1680s and feature exhibits on early stoking making, Romans, local brewing, both the First and the Second World War and of course Richard III and the Battle of Bosworth.

The 1722 Great Meeting Unitarian Chapel will be open for visitors on Saturday September 9 from 10am to 4pm.

“The iconic Hansom Cab will return to its ‘hometown’ as part of the National Heritage Open Days celebration.

“The two-passenger horse-drawn carriage will be back in action on Saturday September 9 with town dignitaries being taken for a spin and the public invited to admire its restored splendour.”

http://www.hinckleytimes.net/news/local-news/heritage-delights-hansom-cab-returns-13549184

Middleham has celebrated its links with Richard….

Philippa at Middleham

A weekend of talks and concerts was held from Friday, 30th June until Sunday, 2nd July, to celebrate Middleham’s connections with King Richard III. I hope at least some of you managed to go along and that you enjoyed it to the full.

An interesting exhibition of medieval effigies and costume….

Courtesy of the Mortimer History Society:

Pembridge costume exhibition

Radio Interview Regarding the Leicester Cathedral Controversy

Having heard that Leicester Cathedral were staging a performance of Shakespeare’s Richard III inside the Cathedral itself, feet from where Richard is buried, I felt I had to do something to protest. It is not that I object to Leicester putting plays on in the Cathedral, although some do. Nor do I hate Shakespeare’s Richard III per se – it is true that he would not be anywhere near as famous without Shakespeare, although perhaps many would feel it preferable if he were less well known and less vilified. And Shakespeare was, of course, a genius, a fact which serves Richard ill because the plays, including the Bard’s Richard III, will never stop being performed. We must try to ensure that any future production of it will incorporate a disclaimer stating that it is fiction and giving a summary of the true Richard.

But it is quite a different matter to stage the play beside Richard’s tomb. So, I started a petition and was lucky enough to be interviewed about it on my local radio station, BBC Essex. Here is the transcript of the interview (there is a link at the bottom to BBC iPlayer, but it will be there only until the end of May 2017):

Dave Monk: Now you may be familiar with the incredible story about Richard III. Now the king was killed following his defeat at the Battle of Bosworth, fought in 1485. His remains were found recently, unearthed beneath a Leicester car park. Well, they now reside in Leicester Cathedral, but a bit of a row has broken out because a production company wants to stage a performance of Shakespeare’s Richard III right there. And funnily enough (he said, name-dropping) I was with the Duke of Gloucester this afternoon, who’s all part of that, of course, because he was Richard, Duke of Gloucester. Critics say it is disrespectful and insensitive as the play portrays Richard in a bad light. Oh, yes it does. Well, Essex author, Joanne Larner, from Rayleigh, is behind the petition calling for the performance to be stopped. And I’d like to know why that is. Joanne, great to have you on. Why have you set this up?

Joanne: Well, it’s just, I thought it was such, a…I was so disappointed. I’ve visited the Cathedral several times and I even was there for the reinterment and I thought they did it really well and they promised to treat Richard’s remains with dignity and honour and I’m so disappointed and saddened and completely disgusted now that they’re doing this because it is almost as if they are dancing on his grave, in a way and I don’t think they are keeping their side of the bargain of treating his remains with dignity and honour.

Dave: Because, let’s face it, Rich – sorry, Shakespeare’s Richard III, Richard was the bad guy. He was a scheming, nasty hunchback, a nasty king, and that’s how he was portrayed and we have no idea whether that’s the truth or not, have we?

Joanne: Oh yes we do!

Dave: Oh go on, then.

Joanne: Well. we think that that portrayal was partly Tudor propaganda – Shakespeare was writing in Tudor times and Tudor had to defame Richard’s character to justify his own taking of the throne. And also, I think as well that Shakespeare may have been doing a satire on a politician of his day, Robert Cecil, who was a hunchback and who was very unpopular. And so, it might not even necessarily be solely about Richard. But, in any case it’s fiction, it isn’t history and the real Richard actually did a lot of good things. I could give you some examples if you’d like to know some of the good things he did.

Dave: Yeah, I’d really like to know, yes.

Joanne: Well, he tried to stamp out corruption of the juries. He was only king for two years, as you know, and he only had one Parliament, but he did all this. He brought in a primitive form of legal aid for the poor, he encouraged reading and learning, he exempted books from taxes – that’s not the action of a tyrant, they usually discourage learning and reading. He had his laws made in English for the first time, so that more people could understand them, he was known before his brother died to be just, loyal and courageous. He was the last English king to die in battle, defending his country and his crown.

Dave: Well, let’s face it we’ve got to always remember, that it’s the victors who write the history books.

Joanne: Exactly, yes.

Dave: You’ve always got to keep that in mind, haven’t you? Why your fascination?

Joanne: Well, I only got interested, actually, after they found him and I saw the documentary and it absolutely fascinated me. And especially the lady, Philippa Langley, who was so passionate about him and I thought, well, how can someone be so passionate about someone who’s been dead five hundred years? And it made me research him and find out about him and I was so inspired that I’ve actually written three novels about him now.

Dave: Pretty good going, isn’t it, really?

Joanne: Mmm, and I’m just as passionate as she is. So – there’s a lot of us   and we all feel really strongly about him.

Dave: So, if it is, I mean you say it’s fiction, if Shakespeare’s Richard III is just fiction, why the big deal? Why the big problem?

Joanne: Well, simply because it portrays him in such a bad light. He’s portrayed as an evil hunchbacked tyrant who murdered his way to the throne and to perform that play literally feet from his grave, I think is just terrible.

Dave: How’s the petition going so far? Have you got much support?

Joanne: Well, it’s only been on for a few days, we’ve already over seven hundred, but obviously the more, the merrier, so anybody else who’d like to sign, I’d really welcome it. You know, it you feel as outraged as I do. I mean, I know Leicester Cathedral do have to make money and they’ve put on other plays there which some people don’t like but I understand that, you know, that they can’t, they don’t charge an entrance fee to the Cathedral, and they’ve put on Richard III before, so they say, but that was before Richard was there. And it’s this juxtaposition of that play and that place that’s the problem.

Dave: Oh alright, Joanne, thank you very much. Joanne Larner, Essex author, from Rayleigh and she is behind that petition to get that performance of Richard III stopped.

 

Since the interview, we have reached well over a thousand signatures – please add yours by clicking the picture of his tomb below.

Photo of Richard III's tomb

Clcik here for link to hear interview – starts near the end of the programme, about 2:45-46

A theory about Tyrrell, Llandovery Castle and the boys from the Tower….

Llandovery Theatre-Feb-2016

I can’t find a date on this article about Llandovery Theatre, but it’s interesting to find a theatre website that supports Richard. It contains an intriguing theory about Tyrell and the boys from the Tower:-
“In 1485, Richard III gave a Charter to Llandovery, and appointed James Tyrell to be steward of Llandovery Castle. Before Bosworth he sent Tyrell to France to ‘monitor’ the build-up of the ‘invasion’ expected from Henry. Were the princes housed at that time in Llandovery Castle, or did Tyrell take them out of England into France for their safety? If we believe Tyrell to be the murderer of the princes, maybe we should start by digging up the car-park beside Llandovery Castle, to see what we may find.”
My thought: Tyrell’s guilt would not automatically mean Richard’s as well, of course. I will never believe that Richard ordered the deaths of two of his nephews, but for some reason left a third nephew (Warwick) alive. Not logical.

llandovery castle

Coming up in July …

literally where it all began nearly five years ago, children can just turn up at the Visitor Centre and learn how archaeology happens.

Sunnes And Roses – A New Release by The Legendary Ten Seconds

Review by Elke Paxson

Sunnes And Roses – it’s finally here, the new album by The Legendary Ten Seconds. This new one focuses on the history and some of the events and people during the War of The Roses. Like the music of the 3 CDs about Richard  III, this is a unique and quite excellent mix of English Folk with a touch of Medieval music and a hint of Rock.

Album cover of Sunnes and Roses

The new album starts off with a song commemorating the battle of Towton, the biggest battle ever fought on English soil and the battle that brought Edward IV to the throne. Quite fitting – the song has a powerful intro with the sound of cannons. It moves on with a forceful rhythm and it has a really rich sound to it.

List of the Dead – this one has a foot tapping rhythm and it’s needed as the lyrics tell of the many battles, the long list of the dead through the many years of the “Cousins’ War”. Quite superbly done.

The Jewel – is a really pretty song. It tells the story of the stunning “Jewel of Middleham” found in 1985 by Ted Seaton. There is a beautiful trumpet intro before a number of other instruments are added – acoustic guitar, percussion, strings and tambourine.

Good King Richard – this is a very nice and rousing duet with Camilla Joyce and Gentian Dyer. It’s going back and forth between accusations and King Richard’s side – very well done with great musical sound and sound effects! Love the song.

Sunnes And Roses – an excellent instrumental. The guitar picking is just outstanding!! It has a very memorable sound!

Battle In The Mist – is a haunting an engaging song about the Battle of Barnet. It’s a good story and its instrumentation and the rhythm come together quite nicely.

Richard of York – this song is about the pretender Perkin Warbeck or was he…. Love the beautiful guitar intro of this song. The harmonies, strings and the guitar sound make it so very beautiful.

King’s Daughter – the second instrumental on this album. This is a really pretty combination of a love song with a fine medieval touch to it.

Middleham Castle on Christmas Eve – one of my all-time favourite songs. It brings everything together – beautiful lyrics that combine the past with the present, the instruments, the sound of the percussions, the harmonies. Fantastic.

A Warwick – the title tells the colourful story of the Kingmaker, the powerful Earl of Warwick. The song moves along nicely and has a swift beat to it.

Souvente Me Souvene – Remember me often, is another instrumental and also the motto of Harry Stafford, 3rd Duke of Buckingham.

Autumn Rain – and speaking of Buckingham….this one is also about him or rather about the “washed out” October rebellion of 1483 that he was subsequently beheaded for. The song is pretty neat and the sound effects are quite fitting.

A Herald’s Lament – a sad song for sure, but it’s not a slow song as you might expect. It tells the story of a herald’s return to an unknown place – perhaps the city elders of York or King Richard’s mother Cecily.

Tewkesbury Medieval Fair – Time to go back in time yet again. This is a really nice song about the annual medieval fair in Tewkesbury. The way it presented it’s easy to imagine yourself being there.

Ian Churchward and The Legendary Ten Seconds have produced another tremendous album full of expertly written songs, fabulous music with a rich sound that brings history to life in a very profound way. ENJOY!

For anyone who might be interested in this fabulous new album, it is available on Amazon.com, at CDbaby.com for download and it should be available in CD format from the Richard III Society by the 31st of January 2017.

 

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