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Archive for the category “Events”

A portrait of Richard in Lego….!

Lego Richard

It was a great idea for the Easter Holiday, to let visitors to the Richard III Centre in Leicester help to create a portrait of Richard. Somehow it doesn’t seem possible that it eventually contained nearly 97,000 bricks, or that it might be destroyed. It deserves to be kept at the centre!

 

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As this Smithsonian article reveals, there is now an additional museum in Westminster Abbey – in the hitherto closed attic, admired by Betjeman. This triforium, now known as the “Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Galleries” is built on the new Weston Tower, designed by Ptolemy Dean.

Exhibits include Henry VII’s funeral effigy, an African Grey parrot owned by Frances Duchess of Richmond and Mary II’s coronation chair.

 

Another female jouster

Recently, we posted about female jousters and here is one you will recognise …

 

A haunted property

Donington Manor

Donington le Heath

Not at all eerie in daylight!

Feel like being spooked? Somewhere with a connection to Richard?

On 8th June, Haunted Heritage Paranormal Events are visiting Donington Le Heath Manor House, near Coalville in Leicestershire, one of the oldest houses in England!

“It is believed that Robert De Herle bought the land and had the house built between 1258 & 1295. For nearly 700 years the house remained a family dwelling. In the early part of the 16th Century, the house was modernised. Around this period the house may have been owned by the Digby family. Sir Everard Digby achieved notoriety as one of the conspirators in the Gunpowder Plot; he was a close friend of Guy Fawkes. In 1963 the house was purchased by Leicestershire County Council and the building was restored and opened to the public in 1973 as a museum.

“There are ghosts at Donington Le Heath Manor House. A housemaid has been seen flitting about and also a man of 17th Century appearance with a tall brimmed hat, thought to be the shade of Sir Everard Digby. During one of our events we captured our famous EVP (electronic voice phenomenon), moments after leaving King Dick’s bedroom, home of the bed that Richard III, the last Plantagenet King of England slept in on his way to the Battle of Bosworth in 1485. Our EVP hit headline news across the world! You can hear this recording on our YouTube channel here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T4GkgTFBPWk

“Donington Le Heath manor House is steeped in history. It is charming and quaint whilst being remarkably eerie. The house, barn and gardens offer a range of exciting and different paranormal experiences. Group members will have the opportunity to use a comprehensive range of paranormal investigative equipment such as dousing rods, EMF meters, ‘Ghost Boxes’ (record voice phenomena) as well as participate in séances, glass divination and table tipping sessions. All of our paranormal events to date at Donington Le Heath have been hugely successful with activity getting stronger every time we visit!”

Here are the details:- Starts 8 June @ 9:00 pm
and ends 9 June @ 2:00 am
The cost is £36.50
Venue 1620’s House (Donington Manor) Manor Road, Coalville,
Leicestershire. LE672FW
http://www.hauntedheritage.co.uk/events/

An exhibition with a sample of Richard’s handwriting….

letter from 7yr-old victoria

One of Richard’s letters is included in this upcoming museum exhibition. Unfortunately for those on this British side of the Atlantic, the museum in question is in New York! The Magic of Handwriting: The Pedro Corrêa do Lago Collection will run from June 1 to September 16, 2018 at the Morgan Library and Museum in New York City.

 

An obituary

Here is the BBC’s official post about Dr. John Ashdown-Hill, who died last Friday. However, his permanent legacy includes these Powerpoint presentations, originally devised so that he can still educate you about Richard, his life, family and era when he first became unwell enough to do so in person. Alternatively, this is the East Anglian Daily Times’ take.

Image: Riikka.

York’s little red tower is opened to the public….

Red Tower, York

Red Tower – York

Originally commissioned by Richard III, and built in 1490, this small brick-built tower in York has been beautifully restored, was opened on Saturday – the day of the royal wedding.

The tower is yet another historic treasure with which Richard is connected. He may not have lived to even middle age, or reigned for more than two years, but his legacy is becoming truly impressive. Oh, and this little tower is also another gem for the city of York!

 

 

 

Royal genealogy before it happens (2)

Seven years ago, before this blog officially began, a letter was published in the Ricardian Bulletin about the common Edward III descent of the Duke and Duchess, as she soon became, of Cambridge through the Gascoigne-Fairfax line.

Now it has been announced that Prince Henry of Wales and the American actress Rachel (Meghan) Markle, or Duke and Duchess of Sussex as they are to become, are to marry on May 19. Tracing her royal descent has been more difficult until this genealogical outline appeared in the Mail on Sunday, back to Sir Ralph Bowes (1480-1516/7). Bowes’ wife, Elizabeth Clifford, was descended from Edward III through the same Mortimer-Percy marriage as were the Cambridges.

In this case, we can see some active participation in “Tudor” and Civil War history as well as Scottish royal descent in both lines – thus Robert I is also a significant common ancestor (twice, along with his brother Edward). The Rising of the North was, of course, in 1569.

Here is more on her lineage and here we present a more complete pedigree for them both. Hopefully, Prince Henry being a second son with red hair and a beard is not a bad omen.

{as published in the March 2018 Bulletin}

Richard the football commentator….?

“…Hollywood actor Michael Sheen has rather bizarrely given his take on how Richard III would have sounded commentating on England and Leicester man Jamie Vardy…” (a player whose middle name is Richard).

This is from two years ago now, but is funny. Definitely a Dalek, I fear. Go to this link and listen in …

KEEP ON DIGGING….

Recently the infamous ‘David’ has popped up yet again, this time stating that Northampton’s large medieval  fair, which began on St George’s  Day, lasted for ten days and may have provided a legitimate reason why Anthony Woodville, Earl  Rivers, bypassed the town and went straight on to Stony Stratford with young Edward V,  instead of meeting the Duke of Gloucester  as arranged.

However, there is a problem with this theory. Although there was indeed a fair held in Northampton,  a rather famous one which attracted traders from all over the Midlands, it was only in 1495 that Henry VII granted an extension to the days it was held, increasing them to eight. It would appear that the original fair was only about three days long.

Even had the fair been eight or ten days long, this was unlikely to prove terribly problematic as far as accomodation went. Northampton was an important centre (although it had been in decline since the Black Death in the 14th c) and had seen during its history several parliaments and the trial of  Thomas Becket. There was even a crusade called at one of the town churches. It had every manner of religious house, scores of inns, and several hospitals. In the 15th c many high-ranking nobles had their own townhouses there; the Dukes of Buckingham had one such residence on Derngate, for instance.

If the fair was seen as a possible deterrant to Rivers entering the town with Edward V, surely Anthony, more than anyone, should have known the situation in advance, being  from a Northamptonshire family, with the Woodville home at Grafton Regis  little more than ten miles from Northampton! Why then agree to a date that would cause some kind of problem with overcrowding? Why not tell the Duke of Gloucester to meet him and the young king elsewhere? (It is also highly unlikely that Richard himself was unaware of the existence of this large, well-attended fair.)

Lastly, regarding room in the town, it seems that Gloucester, Buckingham, and their men, totalling about 600, had no problem finding their own lodgings in Northampton, fair or no fair.

*’David’ may think the content of this post is ‘un-fair.’*

 

medievalNorthampton

map of medieval Northampton

 

 

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