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Medieval treasures, including the Middleham Jewel, to be on permanent display in York….

York Medieval Display

A number of medieval treasures, including the Middleham Jewel, are to go on permanent display at the Yorkshire Museum in York to tell how the city once ruled the North of England, and will be unveiled today.

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Richard visits Ireland….

Galway - Richard

Richard’s gone to Galway! Lucky man. No wonder he’s smiling. Well, it’s The ‘Richard III Discovered’ Exhibition that’s gone, but he’s there in spirit, I’m sure.

http://www.advertiser.ie/galway/article/96655/hail-the-king-science-and-technology-festival-brings-richard-iii-saga-to-galway

http://www.advertiser.ie/galway/article/96630/long-dead-english-king-to-finally-make-royal-visit-to-galway

 

Three new books about Herefordshire villages….

Herefordshire Archive and Records Centre (HARC)
& Logaston Press
invite you to celebrate the launch of three Parish histories
at 7.30pm on Tuesday 7th November
at HARC, Fir Tree Lane, Rotherwas, Hereford HR2 6LA

With short talks by the authors Refreshments available

Eardisley's Early History and the story of The BaskervillesEardisley’s Early History
and the story of The Baskervilles
Edited by Malcolm Mason
This book details the results of research projects commissioned by Eardisley History Group, including a geophysical survey and archaeological excavation of the castle; a building survey of some of the outlying farms and their barns by Duncan James; an evaluation of the earthwork remains at Bollingham and in The Pitts, an area between The Field and Eardisley Wootton; and an account of the changes in the road pattern in recent centuries, and the various projected routes of the tramway. It also includes new research by Bruce Coplestone-Crow on the Baskerville family

The Story of DilwynThe Story of Dilwyn
by Tony Hobbs & Andrew Stirling-Brown
This book gives an outline history of some of the post Domesday landowners and their families, along with what is known of the castle site and development of the churches at both Dilwyn and Stretford, and the brief appearance Dilwyn made in the Civil War. Much of the book then focuses on the past 150 or so years, giving the history of various properties, the school, and those of the local shops, pubs, businesses and some of the farms, together with much social history on the recent life of the village.

 

History of Lyonshall

A History of Lyonshall
From Prehistory to 1850
by Sarah & John Zaluckyj
This book covers the evidence for both prehistoric man in the parish and for settlement in the Roman period, the building of the Saxon dyke, and the arrival of the Normans. It relates the history of the lords of the castle, some of whom had a role on the national stage, and then, from the 1600s, that of the wider population of the parish. The effects of enclosure as strip fields were amalgamated is detailed. Included are various overseers’ efforts to help the poor, as well as accounts of theft, slander and drunken misbehaviour. The shift of the village centre and the effect industries and the industrial revolution with the coming of the tramway are also explored.

ALL PROFITS GO TO HARC

A memory of Hucknall past, a link to Hucknall present…and Richard….

Hucknall

The above notification brings back great memories. Before the Flood, in 1958-60 ,I lived just outside Hucknall, and sometimes waited outside the parish church, where Byron is buried. I little knew then that the notorious poet would feature in more than one of the many Regency novels I was to write. What I DID know then, was that the 15-year-old Me bought a tiny bottle of Max Factor Primitif perfume (forbidden to me, and secretly saved up for out of my pocket money).

Primitif

Clearly I was, even then, a creature of taste and distinction! So, there I stood, outside the church, eyeing my illicit purchase with delight. Too late I wondered how on earth I was going to explain why I was drenched in the stuff. Talk about being wise after the event! And I was a lousy liar. Guilt would have been written all over me, in neon letters.

Anyway, this little story returned to me because I spotted this article. And yes, Richard will feature on the night. Shakespeare’s version, of course.

 

Forthcoming events

Philippa Langley - 2012

“A PANEL of experts on the medieval era will gather in Teesdale for a study day next month.

“St Mary’s Parish Church, in Barnard Castle, will play host to the all-day event held by the Northern Dales Richard III Group on Saturday, October 14.

“Headed by Juliet Barker, a renowned author on medieval English tournaments and chivalry will be deliver a talk titles Knights in Shining Armour. Philippa Langley MBE, whose Looking for Richard project led to the rediscovery of Richard III’s remains in 2012, will be bringing the latest news of her project to uncover the truth about the King of England’s nephews and their disappearance.

“Dr Sandra Pendlington will explore the little-known Anglo-Scottish War of 1480-82 while Dr Katherine Wilson, of Chester University, will reveal the luxuries and stylistic trappings of continental royalty. Kim Harding, group chair, said: ‘We’re thrilled to welcome such prestigious speakers this year on medieval topics that can appeal to anyone, fascinated by history or by art or by the intriguing mysteries of Richard III’s life and reign.'”

For details and to book tickets call 01833-637018 and see here.

I am informed by my good friend Judy Thomson that for those who live in the US, there will be a similar event next spring – the 53rd International Congress on Medieval Studies, which will take place on the campus of Western Michigan University on May 10 to 13, 2018. The Congress program and registration will be available in February. See here.

Unlocking the secrets of the Black Prince’s effigy

Unlocking the secrets of the Black Prince’s effigy

A team of scientists and art historians has been attempting to unravel some of the mysteries surrounding the Black Prince’s tomb. In this short video you can find out what they were up to and what they are hoping to discover.

This investigation is one of a number of research papers and talks that are being prepared for The Black Prince: Man, Mortality & Myth conference on 16 and 17 November 2017. You can find out more about the conference here: https://www.canterbury-cathedral.org/whats-on/event/blackprinceconference/

There will also be a free #YoungFutures conference in the build up to the event for 16-25 year olds. For more information visit: https://www.canterbury-cathedral.org/whats-on/event/youngfutures2017/

#BlackPrince

Canterbury

Portraiture – including Richard – at Redgrave church’s latest history workshop….

Redgrave church

St Mary’s Church at Redgrave is hosting the event, called ‘People Power’, on September 30 from 10.30am-4pm, which will be led by lecturer Tania Harrington. 

June Shepherd, workshop organiser, said it would be the latest in a popular series of study days the church has run since 2007, covering everything from Richard III to First World War airmail.

She said: “From the start our team aimed at providing history lovers with something more meaty than an evening lecture, yet not as involving as a several-month course.

“An added interest is that the study days all take place inside a beautiful building which is itself historically important.”

Cost is £18, including a light lunch. To book, send SAE to Mrs J. Shepherd, Barn View, Chapel Lane, Botesdale IP22 1DT, with cheques made out to Redgrave Church Heritage Trust. 

http://www.edp24.co.uk/going-out/portraiture-to-come-into-focus-at-redgrave-church-s-latest-history-workshop-featuring-tania-harrington-1-5190789

 

Richard III and a hansom cab….?

Atkins Building

The following is taken from the site to which there is a link below. I am posting it because among the exhibits will be items concerning Richard III and Bosworth:-

The iconic Hansom Cab will return to its ‘hometown’ as part of the National Heritage Open Days celebration.

The two-passenger horse-drawn carriage will be back in action on Saturday September 9 with town dignitaries being taken for a spin and the public invited to admire its restored splendour.

Developed and tested by Joseph Hansom in Hinckley and patented in 1834, the Hansom cab went on to become one of the most popular forms of transport during the 1800s.

hansom cab

This example, which once graced the entrance to the Hinckley Island Hotel, has been fully restored and remains in the custody of the restorer until a suitable site to house it can be found in the town.

Long-term plans are likely to see it put on show at Hinckley and District Museum but fundraising to create an extension to accommodate it needs to be completed first.

The cab is not the only historical attraction to command attention on the day. Several listed buildings not usually operating a full-time ‘open door’ policy will be available for the public to tour.

These include the Atkins Building, Hinckley and District Museum, Hinckley Great Meeting Unitarian Chapel, St Peter’s Church in Thornton as well as the Hinckley Masonic Hall.

A special history display will be mounted in Hinckley Market Place, with information from the Hinckley and Bosworth Borough Council, local history group Hinckley District Past and Present and also historian Greg Drozdz. Greg will also be leading a walk dedicated to Hinckley’s literary heritage.

The celebration also coincides with the 50th anniversary of conservation areas and a special display will be held within the Market Place.

Borough Councillor Stan Rooney, said: “Having a Hansom cab return to the streets of Hinckley will be a wonderful sight and showcase the heritage that this town has to offer.

“The Hansom cab is an asset to the town and long may we continue to celebrate the fact it was developed here. I am very excited to see the cab in action.”

Hinckley Masonic Hall on St Mary’s Road, will be open on Saturday September 9 from 10am to 3pm to allow visitors access to the Masonic Lodge rooms and lean about the 300th anniversary of Freemasonry and the history of the Hinckley lodges.

Greg Drozdz’s literary themed walk takes place at 2.30pm on Saturday September 9.

Grade I-listed medieval church, St Peter’s at Thornton will be open from 10am to 6pm on Saturday September 9 and from 1pm to 5pm on Sunday September 10.

The museum, Atkins Building and Unitarian Chapel form the focus of a guided walk which starts at 10.30am on Saturday September 9.

Beginning at the museum on Lower Bond Street the tour moves across the road to what was once one of the largest hosiery factories in the world then turns up Baines Lane to visit the Great Meeting Chapel with its links to the Atkins family revealed.

Refreshments will be available at all three venues. The Atkins Building offers full wheelchair access and there is partial wheelchair access available at the other two sites. To book a place email info@atkinsbuilding.co.uk or call Hinckley 247070.

■ For further heritage insight Hinckley and District Museum will be free to visitors on Friday and Saturday September 8 and 9 from 10am to 4pm and Sunday September 10 from 2pm to 5pm.

The thatched former frame-work knitters cottages date from the 1680s and feature exhibits on early stoking making, Romans, local brewing, both the First and the Second World War and of course Richard III and the Battle of Bosworth.

The 1722 Great Meeting Unitarian Chapel will be open for visitors on Saturday September 9 from 10am to 4pm.

“The iconic Hansom Cab will return to its ‘hometown’ as part of the National Heritage Open Days celebration.

“The two-passenger horse-drawn carriage will be back in action on Saturday September 9 with town dignitaries being taken for a spin and the public invited to admire its restored splendour.”

http://www.hinckleytimes.net/news/local-news/heritage-delights-hansom-cab-returns-13549184

Middleham has celebrated its links with Richard….

Philippa at Middleham

A weekend of talks and concerts was held from Friday, 30th June until Sunday, 2nd July, to celebrate Middleham’s connections with King Richard III. I hope at least some of you managed to go along and that you enjoyed it to the full.

An interesting exhibition of medieval effigies and costume….

Courtesy of the Mortimer History Society:

Pembridge costume exhibition

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