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Doncaster Heritage Festival 2018, and Philippa Langley….

Heritage Festival 2018

Philippa Langley will be giving a talk at this year’s Doncaster Heritage Festival.

“…Writer and producer Philippa Langley MBE will be delivering this year’s David Hey Memorial Lecture – The Looking for Richard Project. In 2012, Philippa led the successful search to locate the grave of King Richard III through the Looking For Richard Project. Philippa conceived, facilitated and commissioned this unique historical investigation.

“You can hear her incredible story at Doncaster Museum & Art Gallery on Sunday 29th April. Tickets £8…”

 

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Shakespeare’s Richard on tippy-toes….?

Richard Tippy Toes

Well, as if the Bard’s Richard weren’t bad enough already, now we have him cavorting around in ballet shoes? It doesn’t bear thinking about….

 

The Bard’s version of Richard to go on trial….

hugh_dennis

Well, if Shakespeare’s Richard is to go on trial, I can’t imagine there’ll be any other verdict than guilty! Unless the jury’s been got at. But if it were to be the real Richard…a different matter entirely. Innocent!

 

 

 

 

2,000 years of Yorkshire’s historic personalities, including Richard….

Cartimandua (Natascha Turford) awaits to punish traitors to Rome_jpg_gallery

This new York Dungeon series of the Yorkshire Rogues & Legends series may start this month with Cartimandua, but Richard is in the offing, and as he’s described as “much-maligned” it doesn’t seem to be in the Tudor camp!

“…The next in line in the Yorkshire Rogues & Legends series will feature Knaresborough psychic Mother Shipton from May, followed by the much maligned last Plantagenet king, Richard III…”

Cartimandua, of course, is either a vile and murderous collaborator or a clever patriot who played the Romans at their own game. Which description you subscribe to is entirely a matter of personal choice.  But then, we choose to believe in Richard III as a betrayed and wrongly besmirched king.  I have no doubt at all that he was the rightful King of England, and was killed by treachery. A good, courageous, just man whose enemies didn’t want such a man on the throne. They fancied—and got!—corruption!

So, is Cartimandua, the so-called killer queen, actually a wronged queen? Or did she earn her bloodthirsty reputation?

In May this series about Yorkshire’s “rogues and villains” will turn its attention to the Knaresborough psychic, Mother Shipton, and from July we will have Richard III. Then in October will come the Pearl of York, Saint Margaret Clitheroe, a 16th century martyr of the Roman Catholic Church, of whom I confess I have never heard.

“…The York Dungeon, in Clifford Street, brings to life 2,000 years of York’s “horrible history” in a 75-minute journey that combines theatrical actors, special effects, stages, scenes, black comedy and storytelling for a “walkthrough experience that you see, hear, touch, smell and feel”. For more information on the shows, visit thedungeons.com/york. …”

 

 

Archbishop of Canterbury found Richard’s funeral a slightly surreal experience….

Archbishop of Canterbury on Richard's Funeral

“Ahead of his three-day visit to Leicester, the Archbishop of Canterbury talks about the burial of King Richard III, his last major visit in the city, in 2015.

“The remains of King Richard III was reburied after his remains were found below a car park in 2012.

“The right-reverend Justin Welby led the service and says it was a surreal experience.”

The article from which the above passage is taken contains an interview with the Right Reverend Justin Welby. Bad marks ITV News – that second sentence/paragraph is dreadful!

 

An Easter exhibition

From Saturday to Easter Monday, the Richard III Visitor Centrekinglego1JPG will have a special interactive exhibition for children, including the chance to build the King from Lego bricks or to illustrate him in other ways.

 

Thirteen very unusual facts about Leicester, and Philippa Langley’s discovery of Richard’s resting place is one of them….!

Leicester

Well, these days we are all accustomed to reading about Leicester because England’s finest king is now buried there. Richard does indeed figure in this rather peculiar list of thirteen fascinating facts about the city and its county, and (for once) Philippa Langley gets full credit. Excellent. What happened to her might read like a fairy tale, but it’s true! Truth is indeed stranger than fiction.

All thirteen facts in the list are interesting/astonishing. Take a peek here.

The source of all this is the award-winning podcasters No Such Thing as a Fish. They brought their tour to the De Montfort Hall on Tuesday, November 28th. See also here.

The Legendary Ten Seconds again

They will be performing at Coleridge Church on 5th March and for the Devon and Cornwall Branch of the Richard III Society on 26th May. Read more here

The accounts for the Duchy of Cornwall, ordered by Richard III in June 1483….

1483 duchy of cornwall accounts

“The accounts for the Duchy of Cornwall for 1483 – a momentous year in English history – are to be sold at Bonhams Fine Books and Manuscripts Sale in London on 21 March. They are estimated at £4,000-6,000.

“The records were taken to Bonhams offices in Exeter for valuation, having been bought as part of a job lot at a local auction in Devon. They were drawn up on the orders of Richard III who came to the English throne in June 1483. His brother Edward IV had died earlier that year, and Richard had been appointed Protector to his 12 year old nephew, who succeeded his father as Edward V.  When Edward V was denounced as the product of an unlawful marriage, he was stripped of the crown and Richard declared the legitimate king in his place.  Edward and his brother Richard were imprisoned in the Tower of London, where they were later famously murdered, traditionally on the orders of Richard III.”*

“The Duchy of Cornwall was created by Edward III in 1337, specifically to produce an income for the heir to the throne.  It covered, and still covers, areas outside Cornwall -mainly in Devon, including Plympton, Tavistock and Exeter. The accounts for sale are for the period Michaelmas, 22nd year of Edward IV’s reign to Michaelmas, the first year of Richard III’s year i.e. 29 September 1482-29 September 1483. During this time, the position of Duke of Cornwall was held by the future Edward V, and then by Richard III’s son Edward (who died the following year at the age of 10).”

“The records are highly detailed, showing totals for rents, sales and court receipts for each manor within the Duchy, with the names of the bailiffs or reeves. The receipts for tin mines were particularly valuable.  By this period, the profits from the Duchy were worth around £500 a year. By contrast, the annual average wage of a labourer was then about £2.00.

“Bonhams valuer in Exeter, Sam Tuke, said, ‘It is always exciting to come across something so special. The accounts are particularly interesting because they include details of properties in Devon as well as in Cornwall itself. They are of course, written in mediaeval Latin, but our specialists were able to decipher the text, and reveal their true value.’”

* Traditionally usually means “according to Tudor propaganda” and should not be believed in this case. It is not known what happened to the boys in the Tower, but to lay the blame solely at Richard III’s feet is naïve. If he was in the business of murdering his brothers’ children, there were many others he would have disposed of as well. On the other hand, there were people who would have benefited from the boys’ deaths, including Henry VII, Margaret Beaufort and the Duke of Buckingham. Henry certainly didn’t want them around when he had to make Elizabeth of York legitimate in order to marry her. So forget Richard in this matter, and look to his enemies.

 

Postscript: Here is a link to a further article about these accounts. It contains much more information about the discovery. Just look away when you reach that word “hunchback”!

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/02/27/medieval-accounts-richard-iiis-rule-found-among-job-lot-1930s/

 

A request for authenticity

Today in 1606, the last of the “Gunpowder Plotters”, including Guido Fawkes, were executed at Tyburn. Some had been put to death the previous day whilst others, including Robert Catesby, were shot at Holbeche House , resisting arrest, soon after the plot was discovered.
All of the executions were carried out by drawing, hanging and quartering yet the commemorations each November feature an effigy of Fawkes being burned.
The other advantages would be that the ceremony would still be practical in wet weather, that the effigy could be repaired and recycled for the following year and that small mammals such as hedgehogs would not be endangered.

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