A PORTRAIT OF EDWARD V AND THE MYSTERY OF COLDRIDGE CHURCH…Part II A Guest Post by John Dike.

Reblogged from A Medieval Potpourri sparkypus.com   EDWARD V – STAINED GLASS COLDRIDGE CHURCH  A guest post from John Dike who is leading Philippa Langley’s Missing Princes Project team in Devon and following on from my post A Portrait of Edward V and Perhaps Even a Resting Place?  :- The window in the Evans Chantry, St… Continue reading A PORTRAIT OF EDWARD V AND THE MYSTERY OF COLDRIDGE CHURCH…Part II A Guest Post by John Dike.

THE MEDIEVAL PRIORY AND CHURCH OF ST MARY SPITAL

REBLOGGED FROM A MEDIEVAL POTPOURRI sparkypus.com Artists impression of how St Mary Spital may have appeared before the Dissolution.  Museum of London.  Artist Faith Vardy.   St. Mary Spital Augustinian Priory and Hospital covered the area known today as Spital Square.  Standing outside the city walls it was bordered from the west by Bishopsgate Street… Continue reading THE MEDIEVAL PRIORY AND CHURCH OF ST MARY SPITAL

A hoard found in Gloucestershire….but it wasn’t quite what it might have been….!

The picture above was taken by my daughter, when she glanced down in a Gloucestershire field and saw something shining. She investigated, and found it was a piece of costume jewellery, half hidden in mud. So she retrieved it…and then something else and then something else. Taking it all home, she washed the mud away… Continue reading A hoard found in Gloucestershire….but it wasn’t quite what it might have been….!

Two mediaeval logboats have been found in the River Boyne

In a case of underwater archaeology, this RTE article describes how Anthony Murphy discovered the logboats near Drogheda, with a drone. It can be compared to the Newport Ship, but is potentially a thousand years older.

Gloucester’s contribution to the Battle of Tewkesbury….

This year is the 550th anniversary of the Battle of Tewkesbury, and—justifiably—Gloucester wants a piece of the celebratory action. After all, Gloucester did contribute a lot to the outcome, by ensuring Margaret and her forces were obliged to take a stand in a place they wouldn’t have chosen. The queen wanted to pass through the… Continue reading Gloucester’s contribution to the Battle of Tewkesbury….

Richard III had magnificent teeth….!

  “….[Richard’s] teeth, judging by the perfectly preserved skull, are magnificent….” Well, so they are! This article  says so! However, it also mentions hunchbacks and the University of Leicester “leading” the search for Richard’s remains, so there are minuses as well. BUT, his teeth are great! Which is more than can be said of Henry… Continue reading Richard III had magnificent teeth….!

A 14th-century village in South Wales….

  The TV series In Search of Medieval Britain, presented by Dr Alixe Bovey, is being repeated at the moment. In it she follows the Gough Map, thought to be the oldest surviving detailed map of England and Wales. Last night I watched the episode concerning Wales, during which she mentioned Cosmeston Medieval Village.  Now,… Continue reading A 14th-century village in South Wales….

Richard III and the Ancient Egyptian cheese….!

In this intriguing list of twenty , the discovery of Richard III’s remains comes in at number two! He was pipped at the post by an extremely old cheese from Egypt. Eh? Old cheese? Sorry, but can that possibly be more important than Richard? It doesn’t even have King Tut’s fingerprints or teethmarks! 😦 Oh… Continue reading Richard III and the Ancient Egyptian cheese….!

Digging up our monarchs; no, not Richard III this time….!

I’m told that even now, if you purchase a plot of ground in which to put your loved ones to rest, the chances are they’ll only lie in peace for eighty years, at which time they are removed and new occupants move in. Well, for centuries our dead haven’t always been left to enjoy their… Continue reading Digging up our monarchs; no, not Richard III this time….!

The Wanderings of King Henry VI

  After the Battle of Hexham (15 May 1464) Henry VI very wisely made himself scarce. His first recorded place of refuge was Muncaster Castle in what is now Cumbria. The distance involved is roughly 90 miles, but anyone who has read Wainwright’s Guides to the Lakeland Fells will appreciate that this would include many… Continue reading The Wanderings of King Henry VI