Was Elizabeth Woodville a witch….?

  Royalty and magic (black or otherwise). Well, the connection isn’t new, after all, King Arthur had Merlin. And when it suited one’s enemies, a charge of witchcraft was always a guaranteed spanner in the works. The first section of this article this article deals with Elizabeth Woodville, and is perhaps of most interest to… Continue reading Was Elizabeth Woodville a witch….?

The Maldon Embroidery

The first thing to notice about this is that is an embroidery not a tapestry, although the “Bayeux Tapestry” is also an embroidery ie hand-stitched. It was constructed to mark the millennium of the 991 Battle of Maldon, at which Vikings, possibly under Olaf Tryggvason, defeated and killed the Saxon Earldorman Brythnoth. It is displayed… Continue reading The Maldon Embroidery

Michael Portillo’s Great Coastal Railway Journeys and Pembroke Castle

  I have enjoyed watching Michael Portillo’s Great Railway Journeys particularly the programmes that have shown him travelling along the coast of South Wales. He stopped off in places that I know well in Glamorgan, also in places that my ancestors hailed from in Carmarthenshire. However, one programme ended up in Pembroke and I must… Continue reading Michael Portillo’s Great Coastal Railway Journeys and Pembroke Castle

The Tomb at King’s Langley

Quite by chance, I recently came across this rather ancient article written by, of all people, Enoch Powell: If Powell’s theory is correct, the tomb in which Edmund of Langley and Isabelle of Castile are buried was intended originally for Richard II and was reallocated after Anne of Bohemia died and Richard decided to commission… Continue reading The Tomb at King’s Langley

The only truly medieval house left in Mousehole….

  This is only house left standing when Mousehole was burned by the Spaniards in 1595. It actually dates back to the 14th century. Maybe it doesn’t look much in the old photograph above, but its modern self is wonderful. I’m envious. All I need to raise is £750,000. Ahem….shouldn’t take long….. To read all… Continue reading The only truly medieval house left in Mousehole….

Vikings in Oxford: What Led to the Attack of 1009 AD

Originally posted on Giaconda's Blog:
Viking ships at sea with warriors on board. Hand-colored woodcut of a 19th-century illustration “We all need earnestly to strive that we might gain God’s mercy and compassion, and that with his help we might resist our enemies. Now it is our will that all the people perform a…

Louise, the mincing monarch….!

  A little later than our period, but sometimes a laugh pops up out of nowhere and I have to share. I was looking through catch-up TV and came upon the following blurb for an episode of the Royal Palaces series: “…Versailles is one of the most enormous and impressive palaces in the world. Louise… Continue reading Louise, the mincing monarch….!

Stanley, The Man Who Wasn’t There….

    Appropriately titled The Man Who Wasn’t There, there is a new book about Sir Thomas Stanley, aka 1st Earl of Derby. Hmm, not my favourite person, so I doubt I’ll be rushing to acquire it. That’s no reflection on the author or the quality of the book, just the subject matter. You can… Continue reading Stanley, The Man Who Wasn’t There….

Henry VIII’s mistresses….

  We’re accustomed to reading about Henry VIII’s six wives, but his mistresses aren’t quite as well known. This article (by Amy Licence) is all about these ladies—at least, about the ones of whom we’re aware. I suspect that Henry was a man of huge appetites and that his little black book was much scribbled… Continue reading Henry VIII’s mistresses….

The FAT Old Duke of York?

Tudor propaganda in regards to the appearance of members of the York family was not confined, it seems, to Richard III, but was  also applied to Edward of Norwich, Duke of York, his grandfather’s older brother, who was slain at Agincourt, the only major English casualty of that famous battle. In the account written closest… Continue reading The FAT Old Duke of York?