Another car park associated with Richard

This one is in his ducal city of Gloucester and covers the remains of the local Whitefriars, dating from about 1270, not long after the Carmelites arrived in England, but demolished nearly three centuries. It was discovered during the building of the King’s Quarter. There were four other priories in Gloucester and we wrote about… Continue reading Another car park associated with Richard

A modern parallel

The Three Estates offered Richard, Duke of Gloucester, the crown when his brother’s bigamy was exposed, thereby bastardising his sons. Something very similar happened as recently as 1997, although there was DNA involved and not a bishop. Anthony, 3rd Baron Moynihan, died in Manila during 1991, after an eventful life that had included five marriages,… Continue reading A modern parallel

Sir Bevis Bulmer – son of Smithfield

Bevis Bulmer certainly didn’t have a good start in life. He was about one when his parents were executed for high treason on the same day in May 1537, having been caught up in the Pilgrimage of Grace. Sir John, from a prominent Yorkshire family, was hanged and beheaded whilst Margaret, his mother who may… Continue reading Sir Bevis Bulmer – son of Smithfield

Piracy, then and now

It has been brought to our attention that a website, probably based in Eastern Europe, has uploaded several hundred recently published history books and made them available without charge or password, ostensibly as an educational project. Whilst we won’t mention the site in question, to avoid encouraging them, here is a reminder of the typical… Continue reading Piracy, then and now

A visit to Beccles (2016)

Originally posted on Mid Anglia Group, Richard III Society:
To visit this town, by the southern extremity of the Broads, the Group assembled at the King’s Head, a short walk from Beccles station on the East Suffolk Line. After this, we met Murray’s late grandfather James Woodrow, local historian, to show us around the town.…

A film scene rewritten

Rather than Shakespeare, this one is from a 1960s film: (Carry On) Don’t Lose Your Head. Most people are probably familiar with the early scene in which Sir Rodney ffing, who is the Black Fingernail, interrupts le Duc de Pommes Frites’ execution, overseen by Camembert, to try to sell him life insurance. Pommes Frites escapes… Continue reading A film scene rewritten

She also married in secret …

… and, to add to Louis XIV, King Fahd of Saudi Arabia, Andre Previn, Ed Sheeran and Princess Beatrice, we can now add the singer Adele to the list – she appears to have married in 2016 but divorced in 2019. In Cairo, they will still maintain that Edward IV married in secret in 1464,… Continue reading She also married in secret …

A few years ago …

… we showed you, through the use of snooker balls, how it is significantly more probable that the Y-chromosome break occurred in the long Gaunt-Beaufort male line than the Langley-York line to Richard III.Although snooker was a nineteenth century invention, some earlier monarchs might well have enjoyed it: Harold II, whose informal wife (in more… Continue reading A few years ago …

Royal History’s Biggest Fibs

Lucy Worsley, having covered the Wars of the Roses, the “Glorious Revolution” and Britain in India, has returned with a further series. This time, the episodes earlier this year having been about the Reformation, the Armada and Queen Anne, she covers the eighteenth to twentieth centuries, reversing the contemporaneous “spin” on the French Revolution, the… Continue reading Royal History’s Biggest Fibs

Some more articles …

… on the Bayeux Tapestry are featured in this excellent journal, Peregrinations by the International Society for the Study of Pilgrimage Art. The first relevant article, which also discusses Viking longboats and the Battle of Fulford, earlier in 1066, starts on (pdf) page 196. The second starting on page 238 compares the Tapestry with Trajan’s… Continue reading Some more articles …